Greek Yogurt Sour?

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SuchSweetThunder

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Hello all,

I'm new to Homebrewtalk as a poster but I've been coming here for information since I started brewing 2 years ago. I just picked up the new "American Sour Beers" book and am eager to try my hand at a sour. I've got everything around the house I need except...yeast/bacteria.

Has anyone else tried this? I picked up some Greek Gods yogurt (unflavored), which contains "live and active cultures of S. thermophilius, B. lactis, L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, Lactobacillus Lactis, and L. bulgaricus." My wife and I have made yogurt from this many times so I know the cultures are capable of fermentation of that sort.

I was thinking of making about a gallon of wort (pilsner and rolled oats) and pitching yeast and a little of this yogurt. I might also try to sour wort with this and then pitch normal yeast in a couple days.

Any thoughts? Are any of these strains going to give me too much acetic acid? Am I better off waiting and trying some Jolly Pumpkin dregs later? Thanks for your help!
 

Oldsock

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Rumor on the interwebs is that a few PacNW breweries are sourcing their Lactobacillus from a local yogurt. No issue with acetic acid, that requires oxygen and other microbes (Brett and/or Acetobacter). Sour worting seems like a good way to go for quick results.

If you wanted to do the full mixed-fermentation sour, you'd need to pitch brewer's yeast too (your choice of strains). If you want funky/fruity Brett character, some bottle dregs wouldn't hurt either.

Hope you enjoy the book!
 

Calder

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You can sour with it. It will sour similar to a Berliner Weisse; no complex brett flavors.

To get it to sour quickly, add to wort ahead of the yeast. Do not use any hops, most lactic acid bacteria are hindered by hops. Stick on an airlock, and try and keep warm (95 - 100 F) for about 7 days. Taste it before adding yeast. Only add yeast when it is as sour as you want it to be, when yeast creates alcohol, it slows (and can stop) the souring process.

OG for Berliners are in the region of 1.035 - 1.040.
 
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SuchSweetThunder

SuchSweetThunder

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Thanks folks! I'll keep you posted as to the results...

Edit: Mashing in now, hoping to let it sour at slightly low temperatures over Christmas and boil/pitch sacchromyces next week.
 
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SuchSweetThunder

SuchSweetThunder

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In a one gallon glass jug, souring now. I basically reproduced our yogurt method (heat to 180, chill to 120ish) but with wort. This is a 3/4 gallon batch, 1 lbs belgian pils and 2 oz. rolled oats, BIAB mashed at 145 for one hour.

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Sleepyemt

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Rumor on the interwebs is that a few PacNW breweries are sourcing their Lactobacillus from a local yogurt. No issue with acetic acid, that requires oxygen and other microbes (Brett and/or Acetobacter). Sour worting seems like a good way to go for quick results.

Cascade brewery?
 
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