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"Grassy" hops?

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Superdave

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I'm thinking I'd like to brew a "Lawnmower" lager for summer drinking.

I was given malt for it, about 16 lbs of pilsner malt and 1/4 or so lb of c-20 (they're already mixed, so there isn't much I can change with that other than maybe adding something). We'd like it to have some actual flavor, so I'm thinking of toasting some of the malt in the oven like Papazian talks about in his books. Also thinking traditional bittering hops like either saaz or tettnanger, and enough to make it a little bitter.

How does that sound so far?

The thing that I'd like to do, given the name, is have a grassy hop aroma, and maybe a bit of flavoring. I know I've heard some hops described as "grassy" but I'm having a hard time finding that word in any hop guides online, or in Papazian's book's hop guide.

I rather enjoy the smell of a freshly cut lawn, and I'm imagining someone taking a sniff of the beer and being reminded of that (though not overpowering, just a nice hint).

Ideas? Or am I crazy to think this hop exists?
 

Mutilated1

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I think "grassy" flavor/aroma comes from just using a lot of hops. Most of the beers I've noticed that had a "grassy" character was where someone thought they had to use a "noble" type hop so they bittered to 30-40 IBUs but they used a low AA hop to do it.

If you're going for "grassy" then here is what I would suggest. I'm guessing that since you're got 16.25 #s that you're making 10 gallons - if you're only planning on using half the grain for 5 gallons then adjust this hop suggestion by 1/2.

Since you're wanting "Lawnmower" beer, then you want to keep the hops restrained, try 3 ounces of a low AA aroma hop like a Hallertau, Liberty, Saaz or Tettnanger at 45 minutes. No late aroma additions. 3 ounces should give you a bit of that grassiness you're looking for but it won't overwhelm and at 45 minutes you should have bitterness and just a bit of flavor and not much aroma too speak of.
 
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Superdave

Superdave

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Hmm, yeah that is a 10 gallon batch (actually, I was told it would be better at 11).

I would like to have the grassy smell (just a hint) so I was hoping there was some kind of aroma hop for that, but if not then too bad I guess. Maybe I'll throw some grass clippings in the boil! (Just kidding, I won't really do it...)
 

ericd

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Fuggles have a very grassy flavor to me.
 

BigEd

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Fuggles are probably the best known hops for a "grassy" note. Willamette, a close relative, might be worth a look too. "Grassiness" or "new-mown hay" were in the tasting notes of a lot of old (when they still had a little flavor left) American lagers. Fuggles were a popular finishing hop for some of those beers way back when so they might be worth a look. An old fashioned bittering hop like Cluster might be a good accompaniment. :mug:
 
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Superdave

Superdave

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So, how about some Tettnanger for bittering, and fuggles at the end--like 5 minutes or so?

david_42, are you talking about dry hopping?
 

david_42

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Correct, and do it near the end of the conditioning.

I wouldn't use Tettnanger for bittering though, it's a low AA aroma hop. Any high AA bittering hop would be a better choice.
 
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