Gower Gold

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chrispy321

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Hi, I am new to brewing, I was looking to do a golden ale,something similar to Gower gold. Has anyone got anything close to this I could use please. Grain, not extract
 

IslandLizard

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From the searches I did, it seems to be a Golden Ale with Cascade hops, 4.5% ABV.
It may be a Pale Ale, depending on bitterness and hoppiness.

Brewing a clone of a commercial beer is extremely difficult. Even if you had the exact recipe and the same ingredients, the differences in process will make a different beer. Don't forget, pretty much every brewery has cultivated their own house yeast(s), intentionally or unintentionally, small deviations and mutations have been adding up over the years. You may get in the ballpark after a few serious tries, tweaks and tastings, but it will still be different.

The good news is, you may brew an even better version (at least to some palates). And if you can consistently replicate that, that's as good as it gets.

We do a commercial clone competition at our homebrew club, about once every other year. Most, if not all beers presented are very good, but none are very close in side by side tastings. There's usually something missing, or some things extra, a specific flavor or aroma, or mouthfeel that doesn't quite compare. It's very difficult pinpointing how to level the field. Then on homebrew level brewing consistency is always a tricky proposition.

What have you brewed so far?
I saw you have an issue with your beer smelling (too) sweet. Maybe you can start a new thread for that. Please post your recipe, yeast, OG and FG, and your general process. And describe as best as you can your impressions as to why you perceive more sweetness than it should have.

I can say reducing the amount of crystal/cara malts may be all it takes, as there are (still) many recipes using too much.
But it's a shot in the dark, until...
 
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chrispy321

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Cheers for the reply, I've tried 4 all grain recipes so far and they have all turned out reasonable but all had a sweet aroma and taste. I tried changing things each time - yeast, taking out crystal/caramel, I reduced mash temp to 149 and no change, the last had OG-1.042-fg 1.006 so looks as though it fermented well.
On my most recent I have bought a fridge with inkbird thermostat, aerated the wort well and hydrated safe ale 05 prior to pitching, this is 6 days into fermentation and all seems to be going well so I'm hopefull I may have resolved - if not I dont know what to do 😥
 

IslandLizard

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all had a sweet aroma and taste. I tried changing things each time - yeast, taking out crystal/caramel, I reduced mash temp to 149 and no change, the last had OG-1.042-fg 1.006 so looks as though it fermented well.
Bottling? How is the carbonation?

Carbonation does more than just prickle the tongue and nose, it helps release aromas and make associated flavors (appear) more prominent. It also cuts down on perceived sweetness, as do lower serving temperatures.

What kind of water do you use? Any water chemistry?
 
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chrispy321

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Bottling? How is the carbonation?

Carbonation does more than just prickle the tongue and nose, it helps release aromas and make associated flavors (appear) more prominent. It also cuts down on perceived sweetness, as do lower serving temperatures.

What kind of water do you use? Any water chemistry?
my carbonation/ bottling has been a mixed bag so far, the last batch was a golden ale and the carbonation was really good. I've used tap water on them so far, however I tried bottled water on the current fermenting batch. I have no experience in water chemistry, maybe I will one day 😀
 

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When brewing all grain, some basic understanding of water chemistry is important, and advantageous to the outcome of the beer.

Water, especially the minerals it contains and the ones you added, add perception of flavor (and aroma). It also influences your mash, pH especially.
You can ask your water company for a water report, especially the minerals we brewers are interested in.

Most municipal ("tap") water contains a small amount of chlorine or chloramines, to keep it sanitary during distribution. To make it suitable for brewing, it needs to be neutralized with a small amount of Campden, as it can (and will) create havoc in beer if not.

"Bottled water" means very little as to what it could contain. Ask the company that sells it for a water report or mineral content for it? Or TDS at minimum.

Some bottled water is plain RO water (close to all minerals removed), some is Spring water or water from "private" wells, either filtered and/or treated. Some may add minerals for better taste, not necessarily better for brewing. Others may be the same tap water you have, filtered, treated, and minerals added before bottling.

Take a look at this water calculator (the free edition is fine) and read the accompanying instructions and pop-ups:
Bru'n Water
 
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chrispy321

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When brewing all grain, some basic understanding of water chemistry is important, and advantageous to the outcome of the beer.

Water, especially the minerals it contains and the ones you added, add perception of flavor (and aroma). It also influences your mash, pH especially.
You can ask your water company for a water report, especially the minerals we brewers are interested in.

Most municipal ("tap") water contains a small amount of chlorine or chloramines, to keep it sanitary during distribution. To make it suitable for brewing, it needs to be neutralized with a small amount of Campden, as it can (and will) create havoc in beer if not.

"Bottled water" means very little as to what it could contain. Ask the company that sells it for a water report or mineral content for it? Or TDS at minimum.

Some bottled water is plain RO water (close to all minerals removed), some is Spring water or water from "private" wells, either filtered and/or treated. Some may add minerals for better taste, not necessarily better for brewing. Others may be the same tap water you have, filtered, treated, and minerals added before bottling.

Take a look at this water calculator (the free edition is fine) and read the accompanying instructions and pop-ups:
Bru'n Water
Thanks a lot, I have had a water report and will try to make sense of it all.
 
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chrispy321

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Thanks a lot, I have had a water report and will try to make sense of it all.
Cheers for the reply, I've tried 4 all grain recipes so far and they have all turned out reasonable but all had a sweet aroma and taste. I tried changing things each time - yeast, taking out crystal/caramel, I reduced mash temp to 149 and no change, the last had OG-1.042-fg 1.006 so looks as though it fermented well.
On my most recent I have bought a fridge with inkbird thermostat, aerated the wort well and hydrated safe ale 05 prior to pitching, this is 6 days into fermentation and all seems to be going well so I'm hopefull I may have resolved - if not I dont know what to do 😥
I took a sample now (day 10) and it tastes and smells great, and grav was spot on (1.006 was 1.046) so it's looking like I've got a cracking dark ale, not sure if it was the controlled temp, hydrating yeast or aeration but il do it the same next time 😁
 
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