got a new book, how to brew like a monk

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Soulshine2

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anyone else purchase this book ? whats your best trappist / abbey style beer youve made . i found a whole new facet of beer with these types. and then hearing since less and less people go into the "order" these styles are sure to become extinct if we the heathens dont keep it up.
 

CascadesBrewer

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It is a good book. Sometimes Stan is not able to pry many details out of the monks! I suspect there is new info available since the book was published, but every time I reread a chapter I pick up some info or tip. "Farmhouse Ales" by Phil Markowski is a good companion.

I have been trying to devote about half of my brew rotations to Belgians over the past year or so. I have only used a handful of yeasts (one batch of WLP500/Chimay, several of WLP530/WY3787/Westmalle, a couple Saisons). I have been struggling some to get reliable yeast character and repeatable results, though I have made some enjoyable beers along the way.

There is also a lot of great info in the thread: All things Trappist
 

mashpaddled

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BLAM is one of the few brewing books that has aged well because it's info right from the source in beer styles that aren't changing considerably. Sure Spencer is more in line with American craft beer trends but the classic abbey/Trappist styles haven't changed much in the past twenty years.

Achel actually lost its Trappist designation because it no longer has monks brewing the beer. There are certainly going to be tough decisions to make over time about that designation. I don't see the styles going away because the monasteries can continue to run even if the brewing facilities are run by secular staff (even if that means losing designations) and the secular breweries are likely to continue brewing what sells.
 

Spartan1979

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BLAM is one of the few brewing books that has aged well because it's info right from the source in beer styles that aren't changing considerably. Sure Spencer is more in line with American craft beer trends but the classic abbey/Trappist styles haven't changed much in the past twenty years.

Achel actually lost its Trappist designation because it no longer has monks brewing the beer. There are certainly going to be tough decisions to make over time about that designation. I don't see the styles going away because the monasteries can continue to run even if the brewing facilities are run by secular staff (even if that means losing designations) and the secular breweries are likely to continue brewing what sells.
Secular staffs can do the brewing as long as they are "supervised" by the monks. Unfortunately, the last monks at Achel grew too old to remain there and were moved to another monastery, IIRC, Westmalle.

 

jrgtr42

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There's plenty of 'secular' breweries that are making those styles as good as the Abbeys (in many cases.)
It's not just because they are monks they brew good beer - it's more to do with the fact they've mostly been doing it for long enough to have the recipes and procedures locked in tight, and by their nature, the brewmasters will train the next generation directly, compared to many secular breweries that the brewer may leave, without really leaving the exact recipes and procedures.
 

bkboiler

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Biggest thing I took away from that book was the dedication to quality.
The monks don't need to turn a profit like commercial enterprises, so they literally brew for passion and just to make a living.
And they don't compromise on their ingredients, methods or most of all PATIENCE!
Talk about a profession well suited to beer brewing...SKILLED in the art of waiting!
 
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