Gluten Free Stout Attempt

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feedthebear

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I attempted to make a gluten free version of my hazelnut stout for my celiac friend with some success. The color is all wrong. Its more of a caramel color.

I'm not quite sure what to add to a gluten free beer to turn it black or at least very dark brown. I'm also going to have to add something to give it that slight coffee flavor the roasted barley gives my regular stout.

I would have skipped the lactose too, but I know my friend hasn't developed lactose intolerance with her celiac's disease.


My recipe:
6lb of sorgum extract
1 lb. dark belgain candi sugar
12 oz. red quinoa
16 oz. wild rice
8 oz. lactose

1 oz Northern Brewer's hops

I steeped the quinoa and wild rice in a cheese cloth bag for 30 minutes at 160F. I got quite a bit of color out of the red quinoa but not as much as I wanted.

The mouthfeel and the sweetness of the wort was about what I expected. My O.G. was 1.056 for a 5.5 gallon batch, which was slightly higher than my target.

The initial flavor is a little different than what I normally get with my regular beers. I don't know how to describe it other than the sweetness and bitterness come through as two completely seperate flavors. Its like sweetness *pause* bitterness

I'll post more as the fermentation continues.
 

chione

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feedthebear said:
I attempted to make a gluten free version of my hazelnut stout for my celiac friend with some success. The color is all wrong. Its more of a caramel color.

I'm not quite sure what to add to a gluten free beer to turn it black or at least very dark brown. I'm also going to have to add something to give it that slight coffee flavor the roasted barley gives my regular stout.

I would have skipped the lactose too, but I know my friend hasn't developed lactose intolerance with her celiac's disease.


My recipe:
6lb of sorgum extract
1 lb. dark belgain candi sugar
12 oz. red quinoa
16 oz. wild rice
8 oz. lactose

1 oz Northern Brewer's hops

I steeped the quinoa and wild rice in a cheese cloth bag for 30 minutes at 160F. I got quite a bit of color out of the red quinoa but not as much as I wanted.

The mouthfeel and the sweetness of the wort was about what I expected. My O.G. was 1.056 for a 5.5 gallon batch, which was slightly higher than my target.

The initial flavor is a little different than what I normally get with my regular beers. I don't know how to describe it other than the sweetness and bitterness come through as two completely seperate flavors. Its like sweetness *pause* bitterness

I'll post more as the fermentation continues.
I too have a friend who is a celiac. I am sure will appreciate any beer. Once while out in the field for a week we all went gluten free and let me tell you not have gluten for awhile changes your tastes big time
 

TexLaw

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That's a great recipe, and I'm sure your friend will appreciate it. I'll keep that one handy, should the same situation come up for me.

I don't mean to be sarcastic at all, but have you thought about using a little coffee to add a bit more color and "that slight coffee flavor"? I've never done it, myself, but I imagine there are more than one thread about it here.


TL
 
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feedthebear

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I forgot that my stout had that coffee flavor until I was writing the post. So I added the sentence that it was missing it. After I submitted the thread, I thought, "Duh!" I also thought, it might help with the color too.

I worry that the coffee might interfere with head retention because of the oils.
 

david_42

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Soak some of your red quinoa overnight, then roast it at 350F until very dark, almost burnt. 2-3 hours. Then put it in a paper bag and let it sit for 2-6 weeks. You could go so far as sprouting it first.
 
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feedthebear

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Thanks. I just added that to my rules of thumb list.
 
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