Gluing Hardwood to Pine Collar?

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Clint Yeastwood

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I had all sorts of fancy collar plans for my keezer, but they were holding me back, so I decided to make a simple 2x6 collar.

It's not easy finding a 2x6 that doesn't look like Truckasaurus chewed on it, but I found two that were barely acceptable, and I cut them to length yesterday and ripped the edges off so I would have clean ones. I bought my first Kreg jig to put them together.

Originally, I planned to get oak, which comes in 3/4" actual thickness here. I was going to make a frame big enough to slide over the keezer, and I was going to attach strips inside it to rest on the keezer upper surface. Then I was going to put some kind of foam behind it.

I realized it was going to be a pain to try to do a good job of that with my limited woodworking skills, and I also concluded that collar insulation is not really needed, and that's when I went with 2x6's.

Last night, I had an idea, and I wondered if other people had tried it. Making a 2x6 frame is fairly easy, but unless you are unusually blessed, you won't be able to find pretty 2x6's, and you will have to live with the dings and knots. You can always use a planer and jointer to try to fix the imperfections, but they don't like knots and you might make your collar thinner than you want. Making an all-hardwood frame would be difficult.

My idea is to make the 2x6 frame, get it the way I want it, and then GLUE hardwood to the outside of it. It will cover the joint between wood and keezer, there will be no fasteners to make it look bad, and it will be a whole lot easier than playing around with squares and gluing mitered joints. I would still miter the joints, but after that, I could just slap the oak onto the pine and clamp it in place instead of coming up with a complicated rig to clamp oak all by itself.

A glue joint should be stronger than screws, so I think this ought to work.
 
I used to use veneer 'tape' that I'd glue to the edges of plywood shelves, I don't know if it comes in those sizes but it might be cheaper. Another possibility to consider if you want an attractive cladding might be copper or stainless sheet or even 'tin-tiles' as used for ceilings or backsplashes....Heck, now I'm wondering how cool black and white subway tiles might look on a keezer.
 
The thing I like about hardwood is that is so easy to drill through, using the holes in the pine as guides.

I just finished staining part of the wood. It reminded me of something important: woodworking is way harder than metalworking.
 
Although the movement would be minimal given the width of the pieces, there will still be movement - uneven movement because of the different species. Enough to not want to spread glue all over the surface. My first option would be screws covered with plugs, but since you said mechanical fasteners are out, maybe just a line of glue along the length would do. It would still allow for movement without forcing a checks or warping.

As a woodworker/cabinetmaker, I whole-heartedly, with every fiber of my being, disagree with your last statement :)
 
As a woodworker/cabinetmaker, I whole-heartedly, with every fiber of my being, disagree with your last statement :)
I agree with you both: I'm openly envious of the skill I see in the woodwork others, but since childhood I've had an intuitive relationship with metals and heat and I'd pit my welding and finishing skills with metal against the most accomplished carpenter....It's like this very hobby where the enjoyable and 'easy' brewing techniques of one, are annoying and difficult to another...AIO vs. 3V.
Personally, I'm grateful to have the well-rounded advice of the very diverse lot You all are,,, that said: I'd rather build an ugly table than have to weld an aluminum engine block any day of the week (but of course I'll do both anyway and even though the table I make will be ugly, the engine will do fine. :p )
 
Thank you for the help. It pays to talk to people who know what they're doing.

If you find woodworking easy, my hat is off to you. I have made some reasonably neat things with welders and machine tools, but making a chair a person would put in his, or more to the point, her living room is beyond me. And I really hate painting. Painting well is much harder than metal fab. Thank God for Danish oil and paper towels.

If I ever have to make a dining room table, it will have to look like the picture I'm uploading.

12 15 20 shooting bench with top and hand plane small.jpg
 
My first option would be screws covered with plugs, but since you said mechanical fasteners are out, maybe just a line of glue along the length would do. It would still allow for movement without forcing a checks or warping.
:)
There is no reason I couldn't screw through the pine into the oak, with the heads inside the keezer.

I like glue because it's fast and easy. A monkey can do it. So maybe I can, too.
 
Thank you for the help. It pays to talk to people who know what they're doing.

If you find woodworking easy, my hat is off to you. I have made some reasonably neat things with welders and machine tools, but making a chair a person would put in his, or more to the point, her living room is beyond me. And I really hate painting. Painting well is much harder than metal fab. Thank God for Danish oil and paper towels.

If I ever have to make a dining room table, it will have to look like the picture I'm uploading.

View attachment 810126
I'm currently struggling with how to best refinish some wooden tap handles I bought because they were on sale, but all just stained and/or varnished "natural" :p
 
Don't ask me how to make them shiny and beautiful, but if you just want to be able to say you put a finish on them, Danish oil is the friend of bad woodworkers everywhere. Shellac is supposed to be very easy and forgiving, too.
 

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