Gladfield malt substitute

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szap

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I am looking to do a recipe that calls for Gladfield malt as the base grain. I have not been able to find it stocked locally and am looking for suggestions on a substitute.
 

Golddiggie

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If you're talking about their "ale malt" Looks like you can use Maris Otter.
Probably a typical UK 2-row would also work.

Found that with a few seconds of Google searching. ;)
 
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My knowledge of grains is still not real high. I saw on a comparison chart where they suggested a pale malt, but I'm not sure the difference in a pale malt and a 2-row.
 

Golddiggie

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Typically "pale malt" or "pale ale malt" IS a 2-row malt. When it lists MO as a substitute, that's a good indication. I stock Maris Otter and use that as my main base malt now. I have some UK 2-row left, that will be used up in my coming batch. After that, MO is for all.
 

Steveruch

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My knowledge of grains is still not real high. I saw on a comparison chart where they suggested a pale malt, but I'm not sure the difference in a pale malt and a 2-row.
Pale ale malt is 2-row processed more giving it a slightly darker color (3.5 vs 2) and a slightly richer taste.
 

InspectorJon

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Gladfield is a brand or company (maltster) that makes lots of different malts. Maris Otter is a variety of barley malted by several maltsters (different brands). The link below has good basic information on different base malts. I cut and pasted the section on Pale Malt, then there is Pale Ale Malt which as @Golddiggie said is a little darker. Lots of malt brands, lots of different barley varieties and lots of different malts made from different varieties made by lots of different maltsters gets confusing.

From Understanding Base Malt - Brew Your Own

Pale Malt
Pale Malt is the most common of the base malts used in beer. It is oftentimes called simply called “2-row” malt. This can be a little confusing to new brewers as basically all the malt they will be using is a type of 2-row malt. Just know that if a recipe calls for 2-row malt by name, they are referring to pale malt. Another name for the same type of malt might be the barley variety itself such as Maris Otter.

Pale malt is light in color and usually will be around 2–2.5 degrees Lovibond. It can be used to make basically any beer style and is highly modified so you will not have any trouble getting extract out of it. If you are not sure what base malt you should be using, start with pale malt. It works well in almost all situations. If you are looking to buy malt in bulk and store it yourself, this is definitely a must-have.
 
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