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GF Pale Ale color enhancement

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harry de vos

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hello,
I am brewing a couple of 100% GF all grain Pale Ale each year for my sister, but I want the beer color to be darker.
I want to achieve this by taking a handfull roasted barley malt (not milled or crushed) and soke it for a couple of hours in cold water. Then take the barley out and add this water to my sparge water.
But I am not sure if this is glutenfree?

Can anybody help me with this?
Or is there an other way to darken the color without adding gluten?

Thanks in advance
Harry
 

Miraculix

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hello,
I am brewing a couple of 100% GF all grain Pale Ale each year for my sister, but I want the beer color to be darker.
I want to achieve this by taking a handfull roasted barley malt (not milled or crushed) and soke it for a couple of hours in cold water. Then take the barley out and add this water to my sparge water.
But I am not sure if this is glutenfree?

Can anybody help me with this?
Or is there an other way to darken the color without adding gluten?

Thanks in advance
Harry
Don't.

Barley is not gluten free.

You could roast some rice or millet till it's dark, but I never did that and have no idea how this tastes.
 

skleice

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There are many GF malts of various colors. People also sometimes use Candi syrups, but I prefer grains. What is your grain bill?
 

glutarded-chris

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Legume

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You can use a bit of dark candi syrup.

Alternatly you could get some dehulled chocolate rice or gass hog rice malt and grind a couple ounces to a fine flour (in a coffee grinder), then add this malt flour to your mash.
 
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