Gardening 2024 - Whatcha got going on this year?

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Got the peppers (40), tomatoes (44), and eggplant (6) into the ground this weekend, seeded yellow and green beans near the peppers Cleaned out the pollinator bed and interspersed a native pollinator mix. Trimmed two branches off the neighbors tree that were blocking my light! Overwatered my cucumber starts and replanted so still need to get them in the ground. Going to clean out those ne'er do well strawberries soon and plant squash, rapini, and amaranth. Oregano, tarragon, and sage overwintered and I have basil, thyme, bergamot, dill, cilantro, and marjoram seedlings in the greenhouse. Herbs have been fussy, I probably have overwatered them at critical times. I'm thinking they get dampened off after sprouting.

A lot of the hard work done. Looking forward to watching things grow and getting some time to brew!
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Almost entirely planted. I didn't consistently water that bed where the lettuces are and the germination was poor. Probably need to reseed it. Tore out those pitiful strawberries and planted zukes, crooknecks, pattypans and salad cucumbers, with pickling cucumber starts also planted near the lettuces. Picked some bok choy, garlic scapes, and peapods for some lo mein tonight.
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Got the 50'x50' bird netting installed over three neighboring Rainier cherry trees, and will net one additional tree after work tonight, securing four of our 10 Rainier trees for us (and friends) Should net us somewhere between 50-80 quarts of fresh cherries in the next 2-4 weeks. The remaining six trees will feed the birds this year, as one can only consume/preserve/share so many cherries
 
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Got the melons transplanted yesterday - a bit over a week later than I had hoped for thanks to being sick and then several days of high winds.

Several varieties of musk melons including Ananas, Charentais, and Rocky Ford, plus Cracker Jack seedless watermelon and its pollinator Sugar Baby.
 
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Got the melons transplanted yesterday - a bit over a week later than I had hoped for thanks to being sick and then several days of high winds.

Several varieties of musk melons including Ananas, Charentais, and Rocky Ford, plus Cracker Jack seedless watermelon and its pollinator Sugar Baby.
So are seedless watermelons the result of crossbreeding varieties that then produce sterile(seedless) fruits?
 
Nice! I was just out watering my garden for the impending heat wave. I bought 4 honeybeery plants from Gurneys Kawa and Maxine about two years ago. I had just noticed that Im getting a small crop on a scraggly pair that I was thinking about moving. The other pair are doing really well but no fruit. Any advice?

I'm actually surprised they're doing ok as I'm in a real intense sun followed by intense shade yard. I need to do some research on any additives to make them even more happy. It will be just a matter of time as I believe deer pruned some in the spring and there's some New England hares in the area. Buggers took out my strawberries.
 
I've been pretty hands off with my haskaps. If you planted them two years ago and you're getting a small crop now, I'd say that next year you should be prepared for a bit more. I think my mature plant is on year three or four.
 
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They ain't no Raniers, but at nearly a gallon bucket every other day they are starting to accumulate.

The lovely SWMBO made a pile of jam and jelly including what I understood to be a strawberry lemon beer jelly. Strawbeery Lemon? We'll find out in the next episode of "What's in this jar dear?"
 
I didn't do the garden this year except for the orchard (peaches, pears, apples, dates, persimmons, 1 lone fig tree and 1 lone lemon tree) and planting hops. I'm enlarging and moving the garden and will locate 2 plots around the sprinklers from the aerobic septic. I figure its free water, I had it tested, no e coli, and I figure it will reduce/eliminate buying fertilizer. I never had much use for lawns, and will most likely replace the rest of the lawn with clover at some point.

I'm saving the current garden space for root crops. Even though the water is good coming out of that aerobic septic, I just don't want to use it on root crops (taters, carrots, turnips) etc. so I will plant them in the old garden.
 
oh, I forgot about the grapes, heh. Thanks for reminding me Kent. I put them in years ago, they are sour as all get out. The soil here has a high clay content. But the birds and deer enjoy them. I planted 8 vines and still have 4 survivors scattered around the property.
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I've been pretty hands off with my haskaps. If you planted them two years ago and you're getting a small crop now, I'd say that next year you should be prepared for a bit more. I think my mature plant is on year three or four.
Doh! A couple of days ago while watering my garden I decided to try one of the berries that looked ripe. Not quite a Maine blueberry as I heard them described but a good tartness to it compared to the blueberries in the store. This was two days ago. There were probably about a dozen berries left almost ripe. I have no problem as I enjoy the wildlife that wonders thru my yard but today I took a look and I'm guessing the birds took them all except one. This is where I curse the bald eagle that visits my yard. Do Your Job!!!!

BTW I started growing Haskaps after trying Schramms Honeyberry mead. Delicious
 
Haskap berries are quite popular with wildlife. I noticed an immature robin hanging around our mature bush. The branches are still pretty thin to handle that chonky bird, but it's held so far.
 
I let some get a bigger seed end then put in a paper bag and into the veg drawer in my kegerator set to 38*. In Feb when the stored garlic is going a slight green I do a low olive oil poach until there golden (garlic comfy). At this time the scapes have sucked up all the juice from the stem and the seeds grow to popcorn size with no paper. They're tiny bursts of spicy garlic and can be used every where.
Also they lacto ferment very well and last a long time. At present time my salads get 2 minced every day, because if you ain't forcefully expelling lettuce from your backside you're not eating enough.
 
Bag them in the beer fridge and totally forget about them for a month or two. Then use four or five in some eggs, feed one to your kid, and forget them in the fridge for another month until they finally start to decay.
 
Here's where we are this morning. I'm afraid I need to go buy 8' tomato stakes for the cherry tomatoes. They're all heirloom/indeterminate, started from seed. We have: Hillbilly, Pole Beef Stake, Purple Cherokee, Brandywine, Dad's Sunset, Marmond Garnier Rouge, Sungold Cherry, Chocolate Cherry, and Jelly Bean Cherry. Lots of peppers (only 2 are store bought), 3 kinds of egg plants, 3 types of zucchini and spaghetti squash, and a bunch of melons she wanted to try.

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Speaking of tomatos, have a couple about ripe for picking.

Any old wives tales or facts if there is best time of day / conditions to harvest for best flavor?
 
Speaking of tomatos, have a couple about ripe for picking.

Any old wives tales or facts if there is best time of day / conditions to harvest for best flavor?
I find maters always taste best if picked fully vine-ripened when I'm hungry

once tomato season hits, I'm usually guilty of strolling the vines moments before dinner to see what's ripe and ready. those get snagged and eaten within an hour or two.
 
Did a bit of browsing. Seems there is fair opinion they are best picked in the morning before heat of the day starts to pick up.
 
We're in France this spring/summer so my garden is here-my house sitter has eaten all the asparagus and onions that come up every year in NM. As a first time gardener over here I got tons of advice from my inlaws who all have gardens. In my style I ignored most of it. Everyone told me to wait until May 15th to plant, that's the traditional "last freeze". Understanding that global climate change is real, and with my ability to look at longer term forecasts, my garden was planted before the end of April. As a result of my impatience, we are already eating cayenne peppers, zukes and within a few days we'll have tomatoes. My beets are doing great, bell peppers and eggplant have fruit but are a ways from producing. Unfortunately we had to go back to the states for a month to deal with a medical emergency so when we got back my spinach had bolted and gone to seed, and freaking weeds from hell have taken over. BUT, my inlaws are just now getting flowers on their plants so I'm gonna look like a genius when I start sharing tomatoes with them next week.
 
Using the longer range weather forecasts is reasonable, like 14 days is fine in my opinion. It is getting warmer and all but a freeze is more of a singular event so I would be cautious about moving it too far early without auxillary information like the forecast. Good sources also break up the percentage frost chance by 10% increments too, allows a better risk assessment. I wanted to do it too myself this year but I was recovering from surgery. My tomatoes and peppers wouldn't have been big enough but I would have cukes by now perhaps.
 
My black currants are mostly rotting near the ground. Apparently ribes need support. I have collected about half a gallon of good berries so far, which I'm storing in a Ziploc in the freezer.

I don't really know what to do with them. They aren't going to fit in with any fermentation plans I have. I tried plain currant jam a couple years ago and it was fine, but I wasn't wild about it. Are there any other fruits it jams well with?
 
We're harvesting tomatoes daily, but no zukes yet. We have lots of cayenne, but no bell peppers yet. Out of a 50' row of carrots I had about a dozen germinate so I replanted last week. We had to make an emergency trip back to the States, while we were gone the spinach got ready, bolted and went to seed. So I'll harvest the seed for next spring. We're taking care of a brother-in-law's garden across the street while they spend a month at their beach house. He has plenty of zukes, but only a few green tomatoes, and today we'll eat the last of his artichokes.
 
Squeezed in a bit of gardening time before work this morning ...

We’ve been above 100F for daily highs for over a week now, with 105-108F for our high the past three days. ‘Artwork’ broccoli is really shining and living up to its advertised ability to withstand high temps without bolting. Exposure is full sun from sunrise to sunset, so these are getting blasted full-on every afternoon in the hot sun. Heads and side shoots are tender and super tasty, even when harvested during our hot spell. I’ll grow this variety again next year for sure.

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p.s. the white powder is the BT dust I applied on Sunday. It has eliminated all signs of those pesky green worms, and is harmless to all but soft bodied garden pests


(edit: fixed the variety name to 'Artwork' from what I had incorrectly listed as 'Art Work')
 
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Squeezed in a bit of gardening time before work this morning ...

We’ve been above 100F for daily highs for over a week now, with 105-108F for our high the past three days. ‘Art Work’ broccoli is really shining and living up to its advertised ability to withstand high temps without bolting. Exposure is full sun from sunrise to sunset, so these are getting blasted full-on every afternoon in the hot sun. Heads and side shoots are tender and super tasty, even when harvested during our hot spell. I’ll grow this variety again next year for sure.

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p.s. the white powder is the BT dust I applied on Sunday. It has eliminated all signs of those pesky green worms, and is harmless to all but soft bodied garden pests
Very nice, that's great as far as bolting. I always have trouble with that. I haven't timed my planting well enough for cooler temps. Do you do anything special for increasing head diameter? I think it's generally the heat or variety but mine are never large. I've been increasing spacing too but have approached a limit due to keeping all brassica types in one bed since I use row cover too. I use BT too but those butterflies are relentless here!
 
Very nice, that's great as far as bolting. I always have trouble with that. I haven't timed my planting well enough for cooler temps. Do you do anything special for increasing head diameter? I think it's generally the heat or variety but mine are never large. I've been increasing spacing too but have approached a limit due to keeping all brassica types in one bed since I use row cover too. I use BT too but those butterflies are relentless here!
I actually planted about two weeks later than I planned to this year, so imagine 'Artwork' would produce even larger heads if given a bit more time to set up house before the warm weather started knocking.

I tried a couple broccoli plants from Home Depot last year, but they never did anything given we go from last killer freeze in late May to daytime highs in the mid 80s within a couple weeks. This winter I read an article from a local Master Gardener who noted she was having solid success with a couple 'heat tolerant' varieties (but she never named what they were), and that got me scouring seed companies to see what was available.

All I've done is get my soil pH down from 8.2 to 6.5, amend the raised row with organics, peat, and Maple leaves I composted after shredding them with a mulching mower. I water via soaker hoses along the row daily (2-3x daily in our current heat wave with ultra-hard well water) and use diluted liquid fish fertilizer every other weekend. Dusted with BT last week after finding several green worms crawling on the leaves. O, and harvest before the flowers swell too far (and then become bitter)

I saw one plant start showing signs of bolting earlier today, but all of the others are happy as can be.

Definitely need to increase spacing between plants next year on both the broccoli and squashes (heat tolerant varieties of green and yellow zucchini + a bush version of Delicata) Since getting the soil Ph adjusted to slightly acidic, everything is growing like mad. Amazing what this simple (and often overlooked part) done for the good this year. The maters planted at the end of May are already larger than they grew the entirety of last year, and the melons have overrun to where I need to start pruning lest they escape down the retaining wall and into the driveway.
 
I actually planted about two weeks later than I planned to this year, so imagine 'Art Work' would produce even larger heads if given a bit more time to set up house before the warm weather started knocking.

I tried a couple broccoli plants from Home Depot last year, but they never did anything given we go from last killer freeze in late May to daytime highs in the mid 80s within a couple weeks. This winter I read an article from a local Master Gardener who noted she was having solid success with a couple 'heat tolerant' varieties (but she never named what they were), and that got me scouring seed companies to see what was available.

All I've done is get my soil pH down from 8.2 to 6.5, amend the raised row with organics, peat, and Maple leaves I composted after shredding them with a mulching mower. I water via soaker hoses along the row daily (2-3x daily in our current heat wave with ultra-hard well water) and use diluted liquid fish fertilizer every other weekend. Dusted with BT last week after finding several green worms crawling on the leaves. O, and harvest before the flowers swell too far (and then become bitter)

I saw one plant start showing signs of bolting earlier today, but all of the others are happy as can be.

Definitely need to increase spacing between plants next year on both the broccoli and squashes (heat tolerant varieties of green and yellow zucchini + a bush version of Delicata) Since getting the soil Ph adjusted to slightly acidic, everything is growing like mad. Amazing what this simple (and often overlooked part) done for the good this year. The maters planted at the end of May are already larger than they grew the entirety of last year, and the melons have overrun to where I need to start pruning lest they escape down the retaining wall and into the driveway.
just saw that I misspelled the broccoli variety name - it's 'Artwork' and not 'Art Work' My prior posts were edited and now have this error corrected.

I also have a couple plants of 'Lieutenant' that is heat tolerant and holding up ok. it has decent heads still, but is not as outstanding as the 'Artwork'
 

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