Gaeng Kiaw Waan - Thai green curry recipe

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Ty520

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During my honeymoon in Thailand, we learned to make 'Gaeng Kiaw Waan,' or Thai Green Curry.

Thought I'd share with you all...

FOR THE BASE CURRY PASTE:

-1 fresh thai green chili (can replace w/ jalapeno pepper)
-1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
-1 tsp minced fresh shallot
-1 tsp minced fresh garlic
-1 tsp minced lemon grass (available in some larger chain grocers; or use lemon grass paste which is more common in the US - also available at larger national grocery chains)
-1tsp galangal (Thai dried ginger) but fresh works if that's all that is available
-1/4 tsp minced lime peel (kaffir lime is traditional, but any will do)
-1/2 tsp shrimp paste (or 1 tbs fish sauce)
-1/4 tsp coriander seed
-1/4 tsp cumin seed
-1/2 tsp anise seed
-1/4 tsp peppercorns

Prep:

1. heat pan on low heat and quickly toast the coriander, anise and cumin seed until fragrant - about 30 seconds.
2. add all ingredients into a food processor and blitz until smooth and equally ground - this may take some time, and require scraping down the sides several times, and reversing the direction of the blades several times

*note: a mortar and pestle is more traditional and preferred, and will result in a smoother, finer paste

FOR THE STEW...

-1/4-1/2 Lb protein of choice, sliced, about the size of your index finger (I recommend chicken or a firm white fish like snapper)
-1/3 cup cubed eggplant (eggplant - specifically thai eggplant, which is about the size of a cherry tomato - is traditional, but if you are not a fan of it like me, swap with another firm veggie - i recommend mushrooms)
-1/3 Cup cooked potatoes, diced (about 1/2" cubes)
-1/3 Cup fresh sweet basil, chiffonade
-1/2 fresh large red chili, finely sliced (jalapeno will suffice, but red is traditional, as the Thai seek to add pops of color to their dishes for aesthetic; add more for additional heat to your taste, or swap with red sweet bell peppers if you don't like heat. )
-2 large pieces of lime peel with no pith (kaffir lime leaf is traditional, but difficult to come by in the US)
-2 Tbs curry paste (from recipe above)
-1/2 Cup Chicken or veggie stock
-1/2 Cup coconut cream
-1 tsp fish sauce
-1/4 tsp sugar
-1 Tbs soy sauce
-1/2 tsp lime juice

METHOD:
1. heat sesame oil in large pan on medium high heat and add the curry paste and 1/3 of stock, stirring constantly for about 30 seconds - should be sizzling pretty well; might need to crank up the heat more if you're using a large western saute pan w/ electric stove top
2. add protein, 1/3 stock and lime peel and cook for an additional 2 minutes, stirring constantly
3.add eggplant and potatoes and remaining stock and cook an additional 2 minutes, stirring constantly
4.add coconut cream and mix well; boil for 2 minutes
5.and fish sauce and sugar; cook an additional 30 seconds
6. and basil and chilies and continue to boil for 30 seconds

serve and garnish with fresh basil leaves and additional fresh chilies

an off-dry to semi Reisling or mead works really well with it
 

Evilgrin

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Lemon grass is super easy to grow. If you can find fresh at a market you can usually use them as your starts. Ive done it many times.
 
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Ty520

Ty520

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Lemon grass is super easy to grow. If you can find fresh at a market you can usually use them as your starts. Ive done it many times.

depends on where you live...won't grow very well here
 
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Ty520

Ty520

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Totally depends where you live. We grow it really well in AZ, my SIL grows it well in San Jose.

I'm in tucson and it died on me really quickly.couldn't take the summer heat even with shade for the afternoon
 

Evilgrin

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It thrived in 90F+ STL summers full sun all day. I grow laksa too aka Vietnamese coriander. Every year before the end of the season i take a few cuttings and over winter them. Easiest plant i have ever seen root in just plain tap water. I dried a bunch of it this year. Flavor was far better than i imagined it would be.
 
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Ty520

Ty520

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We have lemon grass in Tucson, in full sun, and it is thriving. It does get watered regularly.

Maybe I'll have to give it another try. In the past, it would shrivel up as soon as we broke 100. Maybe need to amend the soil to retain water better
 

Evilgrin

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If you can get fresh lemon grass at the market use them as starts. Cut off a tiny amount on the root side and cut off the top so the whole start is maybe 8-10" long. Place the starts in a jar with a few inches of water. Within a couple weeks you should see roots at the bottom and a new shoot coming out the top. Ive done this many times and its almost always works.
 

Jonakr

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Maybe I'll have to give it another try. In the past, it would shrivel up as soon as we broke 100. Maybe need to amend the soil to retain water better
I would. We have ours in a giant pot. We cut it back to nearly the ground last year.
I just took this, we’re at 99 right now.

7AAFAF8B-BD56-4A3B-ACDA-BA4655BE187C.jpeg

To be fair, I tried 2 sets of 2 different hops. They got to about 4 feet tall, and croaked. They were on the sunny side of the house, completely exposed, but on the drip irrigation system.
 
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