Fructose, Demerara, Candi sugar

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Quietandsimple

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In Charlie Papazian's book it says that these sugars can be used up to 10% of the total fermentables. My question is this: Has anyone here PERSONALLY BREWED a beer with 10% or more of these particular sugars.

I'm not looking to supplement my malt with a cheap adjunct, I just keep seeing recipes with significant amounts of non-malt fermentables like Belgian candi sugar, and am wondering if they have any advantages or lend any particular flavors to a brew.
 

beergolf

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Certain styles can use even more. sugars.

Belgians often use up to 20 % sugar in their recipes to dry out the beer.
 
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Quietandsimple

Quietandsimple

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I've seen that the Belgians use alot of invert sugar (Candi sugar). Does this help avoid that cidery taste you get from using too much corn or table sugar?
 

Revvy

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You can use up to 30% if the grainbill without worrying about the supposed "cidery" taste...

We need to stop this repeating this oversimplification.

That's actually another one of those brewer's myths that new brewer's tend to repeat over and over like canon, without full understanding what they're talking about.

Too much sugar, in a recipe can give off off flavors, or make a beer cidery, but we're talking about someone who wants to bump up the alcohol on his 6 pounds of extract beer by adding another 6 pounds of table sugar to it.

That whole thing about not adding sugar or else you make "cidery" beer is one of those little "chestnuts" that noobs repeat without thinking deeper about it. When we talk about it being a bad thing, is when the ration of sugar to malt quite high, like frat boys trying to bump up their coopers can...yeah that's a bad thing...but we're not talking about that here, we're talking about an acceptable brewing process for many styles of beer...

I mean do you like Belgian beers? Are they crappy tasting because of the simple sugars that are added? If you like them, that's how they achieved the beer you like.

Belgian beers are a style that are supposed to have simple sugars in it. It raises the abv, but it also cuts down on some of the body, promotes the formation of certain flavors and helps dry the beer out.

A pound or two isn't going to affect the beer in a negative way, especially if the recipe calls for. Even a cooper's which people want to deride, or some others suggest replacing with malt extract, is really meant to have exactly the amount of sugar the recipe might call for. But if you willy nilly add a couple more pounds to it, that's another story.

It's about balance in a recipe, the correct amount of sugar in a recipe is fine, and often serves an important purpose.
 

Calder

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I brewed a Belgian tripel today, used table sugar to about 17% (2.5 lbs in 7 gallons). It's an attempt at a clone of Houblon Chouffe.
 

LJK

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Bit of a late reply on this thread, but here goes anyway.

I'm a lapsed home brewer, just restarted after a 25 year gap.

I have just made a basic English real ale bitter and used about 50% demerara sugar.

I used plenty of Fuggles hops and only put half in to start with, but after fermentation it was not bitter enough so added a small amount of hop extract and then dry hopped.

I was worried that it wouldn't turn out well, as it did have a bit of an off flavour, but now it's settled, it's fantastic. Very flowery hoppy flavour and after taste, but not too bitter. Plenty of flavour overall. It has a huge tight nit head, very foamy, almost like Guinness.

Just thought I'd mention it as I used such a high quantity of sugar with a great result.
 

pelipen

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Without fail, every time I have used various brown sugars, I get a weird taste. Certainly would not call it cidery. Slightly medicinal. It ages out, but since my tastes lean toward malty, I'm pretty much done with adding sugar for the time being.
 
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