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Freezer = Cloudy?

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pintocb

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I brewed an American Wheat Ale and bottled it recently. Tonight I chilled one in the freezer for about 20 to 30 minutes with the intent of crash cooling it and checking on its progress in the bottle. It got really, really cloudy. Anyone have an explanation?

To give a little more info.

I didn't disturb the yeast by handling the bottle roughly.
The beer was cloudy when poured as well, so it wasn't a haze on the bottle.
I compared it to an unchilled bottle and the difference was remarkable.
I'm trying the beer way to early. Its been bottled for a week.
 

ScoutMan

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When a beer is chilled for drinking, these proteins partially precipitate forming a haze. As the beer warms up, the proteins re-dissolve. Only by rapid chilling from near-boiling to room temperature will the Cold Break proteins permanently precipitate and not cause Chill Haze. Chill haze is usually regarded as a cosmetic problem. You cannot taste it. However, chill haze indicates that there is an appreciable level of cold-break-type protein in the beer, which has been linked to long-term stability problems. Hazy beer tends to become stale sooner than non-hazy beer. (Palmer) American wheat beers are supposed to be "cloudy" in appearance. It is part of the BJCP style guidlines.
 
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pintocb

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Super. Thanks for the response. I guess we'll have to drink this up quickly, dammit. <grin>
 
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pintocb

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Please define "extended"
 
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