Forgot to airiete wort

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ronrad

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the last batch of beer i brewed i forgot to airiete it. I woke up realizing this but it was purking away so i figured it would be ok. I normally use notingham yeast for my ales but they were out so i used windsor yeast. The beer started out at 1.07(my largest batch ever) but only ended up at 1.017(I have never had a beer finish that high) There was not much turb, about half the usual and it was darker than usual but then i used a dark ale kit that had way darker syrup than i'm used to. Is this normal for windsor yeast? or is it from not airieating. should i had some yeast and let it sit. Its in a keg now. The beer tastes like normal unaged, un carbonated warm beer to me.
 

Barley-Davidson

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Don't add yeast, 1.017 is almost 76% apparent attenuation, right on target.

Don't know what to tell you about less trub, unless this batch is hopped less than your previous brews.

Let it condition and enjoy it :mug:
 

david_42

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Higher starting gravities means higher finishes. That is good attenuation for Windsor. Since you didn't aerate there was less yeast growth and less trub.
 
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ronrad

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thanks for the post, thats what i was thinking but the dark color of the turb concerned me but thats probably because i bought a kit that had way darker malt than i'm used to getting.. The higher finishing gravity through me too i had never made a batch with that high of gravity before.
 

Moonpile

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As for the amount of trub, recent experience has shown what I think is a direct correlation between aeration and amount of trub.

We've done two hefeweizens recently with essentially the same recipe. The first one used WLP300 and we aerated by draining from a bucket into the carboy, allowing it to splash. At the time we thought we were doing well with the aeration. We just pitched the tube without making a starter.

The more recent hefe used Wyeast 3068 (which in my understanding is similar if not the exact same as WLP300). Since the first batch we've bought a Mix-Stir and we aerated this second batch for 2 or 3 minutes with that. Again we pitched the smack pack without making a starter. This one had 3 or 4 times the amount of trub compared to the first batch.

I'm sure there are variables not accounted for, but it sure seemed to me like aerating resulted in more yeast.

That said, the first batch turned out great and the most recent batch tasted great when we racked it to secondary. It will be hard to compare them after this since the second batch was racked onto strawberries and the first batch was just bottled directly out of primary.

Anyway, it struck me when I saw the easily noticable difference.
 
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