Forgot Protein Rest

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dnolan

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I'm brewing Northern Brewer's Honey Kolsch and forgot to conduct the 122 degree 20 minute rest. Recipe is as follows:

9 lbs German Pils
1 lb Weyermann Pale Wheat

2 Oz Hallertau @ 60 min.
1 lb Honey

Yeast is Safale K-97

I was 30 minutes into the mash at 153 degrees when I realized I neglected the protein rest. Will this beer be any good?
 

pompeiisneaks

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Yes it will, it may not hit the exact OG MAYBE. But nowadays I hear most of the highly modified malts don't have a heavy need for a protein rest. It will still make beer, it will still taste good (so long as none of the other off flavor beasts hit it), it may just be a bit different than you had expected/hoped...
 

Edcculus

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No problem. You don't really need a protein rest with they way they make malt now. It actually has the potential to be detrimental to head retention.


153 is fine for a kolsch. A pound of honey will really help to dry it out.
 

Aspera

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Weyerman does not use the 122 rest for making their extract.
 
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dnolan

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Thanks for easing my mind. Half way through the boil all seems well. Preboil OG was 1.045 (6 gallons), so I don't think efficiency suffered. Why do they suggest doing the protein rest if it is not necessary?
 

G-E-R-M-A-N

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I have a german alt that calls for a protein rest, but I am 2nd guessing it after hearing about current malt modification in numerous places. Opinions?
 

Edcculus

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Back in the day, malted grain wasn't made as well as it is today. This is referred to as "modification". Without going into too much detail, todays maltsters let the grains germinate a bit more, which releases more enzymes, and converts more starch to sugar.

Further, highly modified malt has pretty much already undergone a sort of "protein rest". The proteolytic enzymes in malt have already done their work. By doing a protien rest, you are just breaking down the amina acids and other good protiens that aid in yeast health and head retention.

Unless you know you are using a undermodified malt, a protein rest is not really necessary. A lot of people claim it helps in efficiency. My theory is the rest does't actually cause the boost. Its the fact that they are having to slowly heat the mash (whether direct fired, RIMS or HERMS) up to the saccharification rest. Instead of a straight infusion of hot water that will settle around 150-160, heating the mash slowly brings it up through the 130's and 140's. Starch degrading enzymes can work in temperatures as low as 130. They are just at peaki operating conditions at slightly higher temps. If you are really worried about conversion efficiency, it would be better to do a rest at 140 for 20 minutes.

Oh and G-E-R-M-A-N:
Just because a recipe calls for it, doesn't mean you have to do it. Remember, its not a recipe, it is a note of what the previous brewer did.
 

Denny

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I have a german alt that calls for a protein rest, but I am 2nd guessing it after hearing about current malt modification in numerous places. Opinions?
Unless you specifically know your malt needs it, skip it. A p rest should be based on the malt you use, not a recipe.

EDIT:just noticed that Edcculus posted almost the same thing!
 

Edcculus

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Yea, honey will contribute more flavor than corn sugar. Try making a small batch of mead. That is more along the lines of what fermented honey will add. Corn sugar is fine for beer since there is a lot of other strong flavor. Obviously there is a reason why nobody makes fermented corn sugar beverages.
 

G-E-R-M-A-N

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4 lbs. German Munich
2 lbs. German Dark Munich 40 EBC
3.5 lbs. German Pilsen
1 lbs. Weyermann Caramunich II

This is what my grains bill will be for the recipe. How are you guys knowing which grains need protein rest? I got the grains from a N.B. kit.
 
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