Quantcast

Forced Carb. Or Bottle Priming.

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

TampaTim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
74
Reaction score
0
Location
Tampa, FL
Is there a difference in the taste?

I know there is in a commercial brew when the beer has been pasteurized and the beer is force carbed.

But in the homebrew arena. Does the force carbing make a difference over CO2 derived directly from the live beer?
 

BrewDey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2007
Messages
456
Reaction score
1
Location
Cincinnati
I've been trying to figure this out as well. In my short time (3 batches) kegging, I am loving force-carbing. I'm able to get much more consistent 'pub-like' carbing that is just the right level and leaves nice lacing. I was never able to get that kind of head retention from bottle carbing.

I think part of what makes it seem better is that it resembles more commercial brews-which is what we're used to (especially non-brewers). IMO, the less bio-chemical reactions that you need to govern-the better. In my limited experience, kegging has meant less work and yields better beer in less time. It has honestly renewed my zest for brewing-although I'm sure my gut will grow due to having beer on tap at all times.
 

Superdave

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 15, 2008
Messages
121
Reaction score
0
Location
Manhattan Kansas
In my opinion, it is mostly a difference of preference.

First, you can prime both kegs and bottles with sugar, and you can force carbonate beer for bottling and kegging. (Bottling beer out of a keg that has been carbonated requires a bit different equipment, but it is nice and simple still.)

Also, not all breweries that force carbonate their beer pasteurize it. I know from experience.

If you prime your keg with sugar, you'll get a bit of the yeast in the first couple pulls, then it should clear up.

If you force carbonate the beer in a keg then bottle it, you don't get the yeast but it is a little more difficult to get consistent fills, as the beer will foam a bit while filling. It takes a bit more finesse.

I prefer to bottle condition my beer, because bottles are easily portioned, and easy to travel with and share with friends/family. Also, bottling time is a good time to spend an hour or two with a friend working together on a project, drinking some beer, and chatting.

I've also read more than once that the yeasties help protect the beer and let it last a little longer than force carbonated beer.

Also, if you have a beer that needs some aging, that can be overlapped with the process of the yeast carbonating the beer in the bottle.

All that said, I would like to set up some kind of tap system at my house, and maybe split batches in two, bottling half and kegging half.
 
Top