force carbonation question

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sneakypete

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Not too long ago I kegged my first keg, and when I tried it, it was kind of yeasty, so I waited a few more days and let things settle, and it seemed to be ok, but then it was yeasty again a few days later.

Do you guys put in the same amount of brewers yeast when you keg as you do when you are going to bottle? I was wondering if there was extra yeast in the keg because not all of it was used up since it didn't have the extra priming sugar as it would if I bottled?
 

Arneba28

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Remember that your dip tube is at the bottom where all the yeast settles. Right where the yeast would be if you bottle conditioned. I use a secondary for all my kegged beers just to cut down on the amount of sediment that I get in the keg. Just run the tap for a few seconds and you should clear out all the yeastys
 

EdWort

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How long did you let your beer ferment before you kegged it. My beers turn out clear after sitting in a keg for a while and will remain so till the keg is disturbed.

You may have kegged too early.
 

GilaMinumBeer

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Okay first off, yeast does not get "used up" and go away. It finishes it's job and flocculates, or drops to the bottom of the vessel. As other have said, the bottom is where the dip tube is so yeast gets sucked up in the fiorst pint or two. And if you move it around, that will kick yeast back up into the beer and will need time to settle again.

If you have issues with yeast consider things like Isinglass in the secondary or filtration prior to kegging.
 
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sneakypete

sneakypete

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I had mine in for 7 days. I am making an amber ale for my next keg batch so I will maybe let it ferment for 10 days and also use a primary and secondary fermenter.

Do you guys siphon from your primary to your secondary or do you pour it?

Thanks for all the replies!!
 
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I had mine in for 7 days. I am making an amber ale for my next keg batch so I will maybe let it ferment for 10 days and also use a primary and secondary fermenter.

Do you guys siphon from your primary to your secondary or do you pour it?

Thanks for all the replies!!
You never want to pour the beer until you're pouring from tap to glass or bottle to glass. Always siphon. Of course pouring chilled wort to primary is ok too. But after fermentation pouring is a no-no. 2 reasons. 1) Oxidation = drinking cardboard. 2) there goes all the yeats that were nice and settled in the carboy, it is now agitated and mixed with your beer in the keg. If you're doing this you might as well ferment in the keg, then tap and serve!

I would recomend letting ferment longer than 7 days before trasnferring to keg. Sure the beer is probably fermented but you gotta give the yeasties and chance to drop out of the beer and flocculate. This will then leave most of them behind when carefully racking to keg. the general rule is 1 week primary, 2 weeks, secondary. So if you're going from primary to keg, make it 3 weeks primary.
 

malkore

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I'm a little confused...you say you're force carbing...and then talk about adding yeast when kegging.

Are you force carbing with CO2? or are you priming the keg with sugar and adding more yeast for some reason??
 
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