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Force carbing a keg, then disconnecting and storing for awhile?

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robertvrabel

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I'm looking at getting to kegging soon and have a question about the best method to suit my particular need. I'm basically looking to make a beer, keg it, store it, and bring it upnorth (3 hour drive) to my cottage in the summer to plug into a kegerator that is all hooked up and ready to go with a different co2 tank.

1. Can I force carb it at home (at room temp), say a month in advance, then disconnect it and store at room until I'm ready to bring it upnorth? Does it loose carbonation not being hooked up during that period, or would it need to be hooked up to my co2 tank the entire time even though I wont be drinking from it? I plan to do everything at room temp, then cool it when its in the kegerator. Basically I just want it to be near carbonation level prior to bringing it up, so its ready to be drank ASAP!

2. Is there anything I need to be concerned about with traveling with a pressurized keg for a 3 hour car ride? I understand sediment would kick back up into suspension... I'm not to worried about that. We'd let it settle down for awhile before drinking from it.

Any suggestions would be great, thanks!
 

TheWhaleShark

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I'm actually in the exact same situation, except replace "cottage" with "10 year class reunion party." I'm wondering if it might be easier (and more economical) to carb the keg with priming sugar instead of forced CO2.
 
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robertvrabel

robertvrabel

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I'm actually in the exact same situation, except replace "cottage" with "10 year class reunion party." I'm wondering if it might be easier (and more economical) to carb the keg with priming sugar instead of forced CO2.
I thought about that, but I wasn't sure how much longer it would take to carbonate that way. I'm assuming doing that is different than carbing in a bottle since its bulk, but I'm not sure. I guess I'd rather feel better knowing its reached the proper carbonation level, then pulling the plug on it... rather than just hoping its carbed up.
 

shortyjacobs

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Sounds like you have a plan. It will carbonate in a few weeks with sugar. Or you can force carb at room temp in a few weeks. You need higher pressure to force carb at room temp. Look up a carbonation chart for your pressure/volume of CO2 but usually it's around 25-30 PSI to carb at room temp.

Then, take your keg up to your cabin and chill it. ONCE IT'S COLD, release any extra head pressure in the keg, hook it up to your CO2, and drink!
 
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I naturally carb my kegs at room tempurature with 3/4 cup of corn sugar and let them sit for 3 weeks. This always gives me adequate carbonation for most of my beers. Also saves room in the kegerator and is about as fast as the "set and forget" force carb method.
 

TeufelBrew

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Advance carbing works fine, forced or natural. Remember to give the keg a decent amount of time to chill before you get ready to serve though. That's a large volume of tasty beverage to drop from ambient to good serving temp, so it may require a good overnight or full day, depending on the ambient temp.
 
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robertvrabel

robertvrabel

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Advance carbing works fine, forced or natural. Remember to give the keg a decent amount of time to chill before you get ready to serve though. That's a large volume of tasty beverage to drop from ambient to good serving temp, so it may require a good overnight or full day, depending on the ambient temp.
Yeah this was also a concern of mine as well, how long will it take for it to chill. Obviously we want to drink it ASAP. I may have to figure out a method to chill it at home (don't have a spare fridge yet) + chill it in the car (maybe it will fit in a cooler?)

Worst case I'll just bring up a case of bottled beer and drink the keg the next day.
 

commonlaw

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I'd naturally carb, since you can just drop in the priming sugar and then forget about it (good to seat the lid with some pressure, though) until you are ready to travel with it. I agree with letting it sit for a day in a fridge to drop the sediment kicked up by driving and to get it to serving temperature.
 

springer

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When i take beer to events I use one of my Gott 10 gallon beverage coolers. If you don't have one just ice it down a few days in a regular rubbermade tote and put some blankets around it. The beer wont loss much temp in the 3 hour ride . It may however be a little cloudy for a few days till it settles out.
 

david_42

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No problem with storing, carbed, primed or still.

Always transport cornies upright, because you never know when they'll start leaking. Of course, if you have a really old car, kegs never leak.
 

Ntense

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I'm having the same problem here when I'm going to my chalet.

What's the inside high of the Gott 10 gallons? Is it possible to close the lid with a Corny keg in it?

If so, it would be great...:)
 
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