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Foaming issues with keg

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Pogopunx82

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I have a chest freezer set at 43 degrees. I have 7-8 feet of line hooked up to a tower tap I just got. This is my first time using the tower tap. I have a milk stout that was force carbed like usual. I bleed the keg then set it at 9 psi. Im having real bad foaming issues. Any ideas to whats going wrong. I even tried it at 4-5 psi. Same ****.
 

day_trippr

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What kind of faucet - and are you fully opening it when pouring?

If so, maybe the keg Out post poppet isn't fully open. Can you check the beer line to see if it's full of bubbles?

Cheers!
 

Yooper

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You said you carbed it up "as usual". For me, that's setting it in the kegerator at 11 psi and waiting two weeks. That's the "usual", so I'm not sure if that is what you did or not?

One of the issues, if you didn't try to burst carb or shake the keg, is that the tower isn't chilled and the first pour will be foamy due to warm beer in the lines in the tower. Is that possible?
 
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Pogopunx82

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The tower is chilled. Carbed as usual means 30 psi shake and wait 15-20 min then vent, add 15-20 psi wait 4-5 hours then set to serving pressure. There is foam in the line. I use this method with my picnic taps all the time and with no problem. Even the 3rd pour was all foam.
 

Dan

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What Yooper said.

Edit. You already answered her questions.

Couple of ideas.
1. The keg is overcarbed
2. There is a restriction in your "out" plumbing
3. Temp is not as cold as your thermometer tells you.
4. Regulator is totally off - not likely.
5. Turn off the CO2, bleed off pressure and continue bleeding for a day or two. Until very little pressure bleeds off. Then set your pressure to 11 psi and leave for a week.

That's what I'd do. It's beer, not rocket fuel. Patience will fix everything.
 
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Pogopunx82

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The tower is from a bar. It has no brand name on it. No leaks and seems to be set up perfect. There is foam half way up the line but not in the 1st half.
 

day_trippr

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The tower is from a bar. It has no brand name on it. No leaks and seems to be set up perfect. There is foam half way up the line but not in the 1st half.
The foam in the line indicates CO2 breaking out of solution, which usually means the carbonation level exceeds the pouring resistance (beer line diameter and length plus positive elevation change plus faucet resistance). I'd have to agree that it sounds like you have an over carbed brew in that keg...
 

day_trippr

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I believe its 3/16. This has always worked for my picnic taps.
Well then, how about you stick your picnic tap on that keg, see what happens and report back on your findings? Should be simple...

Cheers!
 
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Pogopunx82

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Yea the picnic taps worked fine. It wasnt overcarbed. I guess I have problems with my Tower tap.
 
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