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Pearic

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Hello all,

So I may be stupid. Truly a dummy. Or maybe not. I don't know. All I know is, I've purchased two separate systems for pouring kegged beer, and I've had the same problem with each one. Foamy beer and flat kegs.

For further clarification, a couple months ago I purchased a kegerator conversion kit from KegCo. Not to build a kegerator, but just to keep a 1/6 keg carbonated at a little remote vacation with friends. At the time I had very little knowledge of all the factors that could affect the final pour quality. The beer line in this system is just a metal pipe about 1.5 feet long and I had attached that straight to the coupler. Pressured it to 10psi. Of course this produced very foamy beer. I went ahead and turned off the pressure, bled what was in the keg, and put it back up to something much lower. Could never really get it to work but never bought longer tubing as I figured my planned purchase of a full triple tap kegerator would resolve my issues doing it at home and could work backwards from there. It arrived last weekend with five feet for each tap, went out for a refrigerated keg that I let chill and settle in my own kegerator for several hours. Tapped and pressured to 10psi and, still, got excessive foam. Tonight, dropped pressure to 5psi and bled excess. If I pour off about about 40+oz of foam, which settles into about a pint of very flat beer, I can get nearly 12oz of slightly carbonated beer in a 20oz mug. If let to rest for an hour, I'm back to wasting massive amounts of the stuff. That's all still at 5psi. Interchanged regulators from both system and tanks from both systems. Longer beer lines, 10ft each, arriving tomorrow but posting here now because I'm thinking that the issue is with something I'm doing, not any of my equipment. Pours are faster than they should be, discounting foam pour offs for a good looking pint with an acceptable head, about 6 seconds at 5psi.

New to this forum, truly appreciate any suggestions. Not a homebrewer, (yet), just trying to provide a better way to drink beer for myself, my father, and guests. I've been working with a 1/6bbl keg of Budweiser so as not to mess up any of the nicer stuff while I get it worked out, if that matters. Hoping that through this struggle I can start becoming an expert with the thing.
 
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Pearic

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What width are the beer lines? You want the ~3mm(3/16" I think) ones.
5 feet seems a little short, a rule of thumb here is to start at 2 meter and you're usually good.
Thank you for the reply! I am currently using 3/16". Yeah, 5 feet is a little short, hence me ordering the 10 foot lines. 2 meter is a little under 10 foot. Hoping this will solve things tomorrow, but I went to a homebrew supply store today and they were using standard equipment with 5 foot lines at 8psi for 3 different styles. Pours were just fine. Left me befuddled, I thought for sure he would be using 10 feet based on what I've researched.
 

bracconiere

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so it's a sanke tap then...? an off the wall thought to toss out is that with cornys, if the dip tube o-ring has a crack in it it will get co2 into the serving line. could something similar be happening with your sanke? does it have a gasket on the bottom of the thingy that attaches to the keg that could be old and need to be replaced?
 
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Pearic

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so it's a sanke tap then...? an off the wall thought to toss out is that with cornys, if the dip tube o-ring has a crack in it it will get co2 into the serving line. could something similar behappening with your sanke? does it have a gasket on the bottom of the thingy that attaches to the keg that could be old and need to be replaced?
Yes, Sanke. No idea if that dip tube o ring has a crack, but doubtful since this is my third commercial keg with the same issue. No on the coupler having a gasket breakage.
Thanks for the thoughts. Just a few more things I know can possibly happen.
 
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Pearic

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Maybe I'm just playing with the pressure too much? The weird thing is to me is that I'll completely turn off and bleed the pressure, raise it back to 5psi, and then I let it sit. Still, huge amounts of foam and the beer ends up fairly flat. Figure that would settle things down, but maybe I'm just making things worse?
 

day_trippr

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It may seem counterintuitive but you actually may have never set the CO2 pressure high enough.
Many commercial beers are carbonated to a level you might not reach with 10psi and say 40°F, in which case you'd be battling "CO2 breakout", and as "Bubbles Beget Bubbles" the cascade effect could result in your uber foamy pours...

Cheers!
 
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Pearic

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It may seem counterintuitive but you actually may have never set the CO2 pressure high enough.
Many commercial beers are carbonated to a level you might not reach with 10psi and say 40°F, in which case you'd be battling "CO2 breakout", and as "Bubbles Beget Bubbles" the cascade effect could result in your uber foamy pours...

Cheers!
I'm going to try that out when I get home today, thanks for the idea! I'll let you know.
 
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