Quantcast

Floor malted Maris Otter

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

brownni5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2017
Messages
762
Reaction score
325
The past couple English style batches I've done, I noticed my attenuation was lower than expected (Imperial Juice and Darkness - both around 65% AA). Im not a numbers guy, but I found it curious, since I'm usually at least in the middle of the upper end of the listed attenuation range for yeast. Then I realized, I'm using floor malted base malt - Maris Otter

What's the proper/best way to mash this malt to ensure good conversion/attenuation?
 

RM-MN

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
14,469
Reaction score
5,198
Location
Solway
Floor malted grain may not be fully modified and I think the answer to the lower AA is to extend your mash period. The floor malted may not have as many enzymes and need more time.
 

VikeMan

It ain't all burritos and strippers, my friend.
Joined
Aug 24, 2010
Messages
2,950
Reaction score
1,932
Floor malted grain may not be fully modified and I think the answer to the lower AA is to extend your mash period. The floor malted may not have as many enzymes and need more time.
I've heard this said, but when I have checked the malt analyses for floor malted malts, Crisp #19 M.O. and Weyermann Floor Malted Pils specifically, they were actually more modified than their non-floor malted counterparts from the same maltsters. I don't think there's anything inherent to floor malting that automatically leads to low modification.
 
OP
brownni5

brownni5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2017
Messages
762
Reaction score
325
I've heard this said, but when I have checked the malt analyses for floor malted malts, Crisp #19 M.O. and Weyermann Floor Malted Pils specifically, they were actually more modified than their non-floor malted counterparts from the same maltsters. I don't think there's anything inherent to floor malting that automatically leads to low modification.
How does one learn that? This particular malt is Warminster, which as I understand it, is all floor malted. While I don't have the spec sheet for this specific batch, close would probably get me there.
 

VikeMan

It ain't all burritos and strippers, my friend.
Joined
Aug 24, 2010
Messages
2,950
Reaction score
1,932
How does one learn that? This particular malt is Warminster, which as I understand it, is all floor malted. While I don't have the spec sheet for this specific batch, close would probably get me there.
Some analyses are available on the internet. And some maltsters will provide an analysis for the specific batch, if you have the batch number. In the case of Warminster, you can see some key specs here:
Warminster Specs
Assuming you're using the "standard color" M.O., you can see that the minimum Soluble Nitrogen Ratio (SNR) is 36 and the maximum is 42. That's a fully modified malt.

You mentioned getting "lower than expected" attenuation. Maris Otter is generally a somewhat darker base malt, about 2.3-3.2L (after converting from EBC) in your case. The fermentability of worts made from base malts (and malts in general) tends to be lower as the color (from kilning or roasting) increases.
 

Vale71

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
3,419
Reaction score
1,802
How does one learn that?
One does not need to learn that as no malthouse sells undermodified malt today. Any batch that should come out undermodified will be considered a mishap and sold as cattle feed to minimize loss to the malthouse.
 

Vale71

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
3,419
Reaction score
1,802
You mentioned getting "lower than expected" attenuation. Maris Otter is generally a somewhat darker base malt, about 2.3-3.2L (after converting from EBC) in your case. The fermentability of worts made from base malts (and malts in general) tends to be lower as the color (from kilning or roasting) increases.
Second that.
 
OP
brownni5

brownni5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2017
Messages
762
Reaction score
325
Good to know on all accounts - thanks all. I suppose since I was using this base malt to brew darker styles, it could have been the other malts (though in the case of the Old Ale, there wasn't that much specialty malt and even some treacle), and yeasts that I'm not that familiar with. Again, not that worried about it, more curious than anything.
 

Gadjobrinus

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Aug 24, 2017
Messages
5,951
Reaction score
6,090
How does one learn that? This particular malt is Warminster, which as I understand it, is all floor malted. While I don't have the spec sheet for this specific batch, close would probably get me there.
Good resource here is Northern Brewer, who is a British Brewer who has steered me to really nice M.O.
 

AlexKay

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2020
Messages
63
Reaction score
20
Location
South Bend
One does not need to learn that as no malthouse sells undermodified malt today. Any batch that should come out undermodified will be considered a mishap and sold as cattle feed to minimize loss to the malthouse.
Mecca Grade sells a "wind malt" that they specifically advertise as undermodified. S/T spec. is 34-35%. I did not have great success with a single-infusion mash. Not sure I can blame it on the mash, but very low efficiency.
 

Vale71

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2018
Messages
3,419
Reaction score
1,802
It's a at the low end for modern malts (extract fine/corase difference 2.8%) but it's by no means undermodified.
 
Top