Quantcast

Flocculation question

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

cimirie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2009
Messages
799
Reaction score
20
Location
Orlando, FL
Forgive the very basic nature of the question. I'm just spit-balling because I'm not super familiar with wine yeasts. I currently have a batch of EW apfelwein and I used Red Star Champagne yeast, which is a low flocculating yeast. At the three week mark, there has been almost no lees drop-out which doesn't suprise me because of the yeast strain. It does have a very yeasty taste, which leads me to believe there are many tiny yeasties floating around still. So my question is this...

When using a low flocculating yeast, is it safe to assume that the yeast taste will stay with the beer/cider/wine much longer than a high flocculating yeast - due to the lack of drop out?

If yes, does that mean (in general and not only related to my current project) that it will need to condition in the carboy longer than others to get rid of the yeasty taste?

Is there something I can add during the clarification process that will expedite or enhance drop out without sweetening the batch? (I've heard sorbate thrown around to stop fermentation and leave more residual sugars, but if aiming for a dry cider/wine/beer...)

Anyways, I know this is a very basic question that I should know the answer to. I'm not really concerned, it just struck me as a question I should know the answer to. Thanks for the help!
 

Freezeblade

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 25, 2008
Messages
1,415
Reaction score
44
Location
Oakland, California
Yes, you will have to age it longer to let the yeast drop out, compared to say, an ale yeast or a higher floccuating wine yeast. However: The amount of time you should leave apple wines or ciders in the carboy are long enough that it should drop out by the time you are getting ready to bottle (at least 3 MONTHS, not weeks). I usually wait untill the cider/wine is fully clear before bottling, which usually means between 2 months and 4 months, depending on the yeast. I then let them age out in bottle on top of that untill they reach about 6 months from the pitching date. You have have much time to wait, young cider-hopper.
 
OP
cimirie

cimirie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2009
Messages
799
Reaction score
20
Location
Orlando, FL
Thanks for the reply. I've got no problem following your advice. My confusion then may come in with the recipe. In his recipe, EdWort says to leave in the Apfelwein in primary for only 4 weeks in the carboy and no secondary. Many, many people swear by his exact recipe, so I guess that's where my confusion lies (vs many months of aging). I know aging longer isn't typically a bad thing, so again, I'm not opposed.

I know Montrachet is a slightly more flocculent yeast than Red Star Champagne, but not too much so. Is it possible that the slight difference would require that much of a difference in aging? Thanks again!

Also, what about adding something to the cider to help it clarify now?
 

rpres1977

Active Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2009
Messages
35
Reaction score
0
I would personnaly wait until you reached your desired final OG before even thinking about stabalizing and clearing or hang out and let the yeastied to there little duties and they'll eventually clear it for you in time.
 
Top