Flaked rice v minute rice

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RGB Brew

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I read in the forums that you can use minute rice as a substitute for flaked rice.

Is this a pound for pound replacement?
 

day_trippr

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Pretty sure whether flaked or hot-rolled, rice is rice, so use the same weight for measurement even while the density may be quite different...

Cheers!
 

Robert65

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I agree with @day_trippr that rice is rice regarding a weight for weight equivalence, and the important thing is that both products are pre cooked/ pre gelatinized. But I'm not sure the extract contribution will be identical, since the starch may be more readily accessible in a flat flake than a fatter grain of rice -- you know, surface area to volume. If you could break up the rice at all (like grits) I bet it would help up the yield.
 

day_trippr

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Ever seen Minute Rice? The "grains" are no thicker than a flake of rice and obviously aren't anywhere near as wide in one plane.
They both undergo virtually identical transformative processes so I'd expect Minute Rice would actually gelatinize quicker than flaked rice...

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Robert65

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I stand corrected! (No, haven't seen minute rice in person since Mom, in Capri pants and headband, used it in the groovy, swinging days of space age convenience food, baby... [emoji6] )
 

day_trippr

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lol! tbh I cannot remember the last time I had Minute Rice. May have still been a college derelict surviving on highly processed carbs :D
Anyway, it doesn't look like any other rice you've ever eaten - almost looks like the grains are extruded from processed rice paste...

minute-rice-close-view-enriched-precooked-long-grain-33672311.jpg


Not saying it's bad (although real (eg: Basmati) rice is stupid simple to cook in a pot) but it's definitely not representative of long grain rice...

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bwible

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I know this is old, but something I’m looking at recently. Would you use minute rice dry weight or cooked weight? If a recipe calls for a pound of flaked rice, is that a pound dry out of the box or a pound after you cook it on the stove and add it to the mash?

thanks
 

PCABrewing

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I know this is old, but something I’m looking at recently. Would you use minute rice dry weight or cooked weight? If a recipe calls for a pound of flaked rice, is that a pound dry out of the box or a pound after you cook it on the stove and add it to the mash?

thanks
For what its worth (Buffalo Springfield), Minute Rice is already cooked and then freeze-dried IIRC.
That's the extent to which it is processed.
 

IslandLizard

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For what its worth (Buffalo Springfield) [...]
Now, that's a memorable reference!

[...] Minute Rice is already cooked and then freeze-dried IIRC.
That's the extent to which it is processed.
Yes, Minute Rice is a highly processed rice.* Even when added dry, those starches are as ready for the mash as they can be.
But you could add regular, cooked rice instead.

* Minute rice is much more processed and cooks much quicker than parboiled (partially boiled) rice that still needs about 20-30 minutes.
 

PCABrewing

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Now, that's a memorable reference!


Yes, Minute Rice is a highly processed rice.* Even when added dry, those starches are as ready for the mash as they can be.
But you could add regular, cooked rice instead.

* Minute rice is much more processed and cooks much quicker than parboiled (partially boiled) rice that still needs about 20-30 minutes.
Yep sometimes I get nostalgic.. Had to listen to Ohio too, Neil Young led me there..

Re: the rice, I meant that from what I can tell there are no additives.
I don't know what I'd expect in a mash, do you think it would convert quickly?
Should it be crushed?
 

Bohern

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As someone who did a lager back in the summer I used Minute Rice and the beer came out great for a easy drinking lager. I will do it again for sure.

EDIT: I left off I used dry weigh
 
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marc1

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I know this is old, but something I’m looking at recently. Would you use minute rice dry weight or cooked weight? If a recipe calls for a pound of flaked rice, is that a pound dry out of the box or a pound after you cook it on the stove and add it to the mash?

thanks

I would use dry weight.
 

day_trippr

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I would also use dry weight.
We use dry weight in brewing for pretty much everything that isn't outright liquid...

Cheers!
 

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This post is extremely well timed as I've been thinking about using minute rice in a cold IPA recipe but wasn't quite sure how to treat it. I've decided I'll treat it exactly like flaked grains and just toss it in. Does anyone know what the dry extract potential is for minute rice?
 

Bohern

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This post is extremely well timed as I've been thinking about using minute rice in a cold IPA recipe but wasn't quite sure how to treat it. I've decided I'll treat it exactly like flaked grains and just toss it in. Does anyone know what the dry extract potential is for minute rice?

I used the same value I got from the flaked rice in BeerSmith and hit my my numbers.
 

gunhaus

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There is a pretty fair amount of conversation about minute rice in this thread, and whole lotta folks around here used it at one time. Might help!
 

IslandLizard

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Yep sometimes I get nostalgic.. Had to listen to Ohio too, Neil Young led me there..
OHIO (!) ;)
Those guys (Buffalo Springfield, CSN&Y) were brilliant! I've been listening to them since I was 13, and still do at times.

There are some fairly recent performances by CSN on YT. Their later rendering of Suite: Judy Blue Eyes is even more amazing than before. You watch Stills playing that, so easily, so virtuoso, such perfect timing, it's mind boggling.

Re: the rice, I meant that from what I can tell there are no additives.
I don't know what I'd expect in a mash, do you think it would convert quickly?
Should it be crushed?
The minute rice should convert quickly, especially after running it through the mill. The smaller the pieces, the faster it hydrates.
 

bwible

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OHIO (!) ;)
Those guys (Buffalo Springfield, CSN&Y) were brilliant! I've been listening to them since I was 13, and still do at times.

There are some fairly recent performances by CSN on YT. Their later rendering of Suite: Judy Blue Eyes is even more amazing than before. You watch Stills playing that, so easily, so virtuoso, such perfect timing, it's mind boggling.


The minute rice should convert quickly, especially after running it through the mill. The smaller the pieces, the faster it hydrates.
I guess some rice hulls would also be a good idea if I’m using a pound of it?
 

bwible

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I don’t have any issue with using flaked rice except i don’t have any, my nearest homebrew shop is about an hour away and I don’t need much else to justify making the trip or placing a mail order to pay shipping.
 

RM-MN

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Yep sometimes I get nostalgic.. Had to listen to Ohio too, Neil Young led me there..

Re: the rice, I meant that from what I can tell there are no additives.
I don't know what I'd expect in a mash, do you think it would convert quickly?
Should it be crushed?
Of course it should be crushed. You want all the starches out where the enzymes can act on them. Just because it has been pre-cooked doesn't help much in getting the starches and the enzymes to become friendly.
 

IslandLizard

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I don’t have any issue with using flaked rice except i don’t have any, my nearest homebrew shop is about an hour away and I don’t need much else to justify making the trip or placing a mail order to pay shipping.
You can use any regular (cheap) rice instead. You'll need to precook it though, say for an hour, using at least double or triple the volume of water you'd normally use if you were to eat it. Then use that thin rice porridge as part of your strike water.

Now Basmati and Jasmine rice have quite a bit of flavor, so you may want to save those for real cuisine.
 

balrog

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I used minute rice a couple times, and went back to buying and using flaked rice as the OG values were a little lower with the minute rice, even carefully counting dry weights. Normal efficiencies, brew house, running upper 70's (no headband, no capri pants) were upper 60's when I used minute rice, same processing, mashing, etc, running through corona mill, mashing 60m.

I fully realize this is just my two data points, and perhaps high sunspot activity somehow affected results. Or RSM's*



(*random stupid mistakes)
 

IslandLizard

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I fully realize this is just my two data points, and perhaps high sunspot activity somehow affected results. Or RSM's*

(*random stupid mistakes)
I wouldn't be surprised if a decent percentage of starches were removed (lost) during the production process of minute rice. So the kernels contain relatively more of the (cellulose?) matrix.
 

Steveruch

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I don’t have any issue with using flaked rice except i don’t have any, my nearest homebrew shop is about an hour away and I don’t need much else to justify making the trip or placing a mail order to pay shipping.
Get some rice flaked cereal from the grocery store.
 

Transamguy77

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I just use regular rice, cook it normally and then add more water and let it sit over night. By adding more water it will absorb that water and not your mash water, which will cause you to have less volume which at the end of the boil can lead to less wort. Just did a rice lager a couple of weeks ago, 5lbs of rice and like 4 gallons of water.
 

IslandLizard

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Thank you. I was wondering if it was possible to use ordinary long grain rice as it's much, much cheaper.
Sure you can. Short grain, long grain, grain bits (broken rice or "pudding rice") they'll all work fine.

I agree with @Transamguy77 to add more water after cooking and let it stand overnight becoming a pot of thin glue, so it's all well hydrated, ready for the enzymes to start breaking it apart when added to the mash.
Just include the extra added water in your total strike water volume.
 
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