First wit recipe mash question

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Pintabone

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Question is around whether or not a protein rest is required or recommended when using flaked wheat in a Wit. The grain bill is below:

5 lb Pilsner
3 lb flaked wheat
2 lb Red wheat
.5 lb carapils
.5 lb flaked oats
 

xico

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It depends on your set up, if you don't have pumps and a good way to recirculate your mash (and step up temps) I would simply add rice hulls (0.5 - 1.0 lb) to the grist and account for the water loss of the addition.
 
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Pintabone

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It depends on your set up, if you don't have pumps and a good way to recirculate your mash (and step up temps) I would simply add rice hulls (0.5 - 1.0 lb) to the grist and account for the water loss of the addition.
Meant to include that info. Just using a cooler mash tun so any steps will be through infusions. I did intend to add half a pound of rice hulls.
 

dmtaylor

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I did a protein rest on a witbier once. Never again. The witbier turned out clear as crystal, and watery, with no head. Protein rests ruin perfectly good recipes.

In conclusion: Never ever EVER do a protein rest in the 21st century.

Cheers.
 

SoCal-Doug

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You can if you want, but it's probably not necessary.

I have an old (maybe 6 years now) reliable Wit that I brewed again 2 weeks ago. I've always wondered if the rest was needed, but i like it so much I never want to change anything. I did however split the batch so I could ferment half of it with some heisted Allagash yeast. I did 112 for 15 mins, 122 for 15 mins, then 151 for 60 mins.

Unlike dmtaylor's results, its cloudy, great body and head, and lacing stays until the dishwasher starts.
 

dmtaylor

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Unlike dmtaylor's results, its cloudy, great body and head, and lacing stays until the dishwasher starts.
Fair enough man.

I just really don't think a protein rest is ever needed. It's too easy to overdo with today's highly modified malts. It's nearly impossible to find any malts so undermodified that it's ever needed anymore. 100 years ago, sure. Today, never.
 

IslandLizard

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Since you have a little less than 30% of flaked goods it's probably going to be fine without a protein rest. With higher % amounts I would definitely do it, mostly for ease of lautering.

When incorporating larger amounts of unmalted grain (>25%) I perform a combined beta glucanase/protein rest at 121F for 15 minutes (20 minutes if it's rye). Then ramp up to sacch temps. Never had any trouble with loss of head retention.

I've done Warner's double wheat decoction which include a 10' beta glucanase/protein rest at 122F, and 2/3 of the mash sitting at 127.5F for an hour while processing the 1st decoction. All with phenomenal results.

Please note, the gelatinization temperature of Barley starts around 142F, well above the 127.5F of the beta glucanase/protein rest.
 

xico

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There are some wit recipes that call for a lot more unmalted grains than 25% and I concur with IslandLizard that a protein rest is useful. I haven't had an issue with clarity doing so but I don't doubt it possible.

A different style but one that shares a heavy wheat load, hefeweizens in Bavaria using 60% wheat malt will gum up on you and don't have hulls to contribute to the flow. I humbly disagree that there is no place for the step mash any longer. While for most styles it is true that the lower rests are overkill, "never" encompasses a contestable range of exceptions that include wits/weizens/berliners/saisons.
 
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