First time adding fruit to secondary

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CountryMile

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Hello,

I recently added some pawpaw to a blond ale after primary fermentation recently. It has started to ferment again which is expected. I usually let my beer sit in diacetyl rest for about two weeks. My question is pawpaw doesn't keep for too long, after secondary fermentation is there a risk of the pawpaw rotting in the fermenter? Should i skip the rest period? Thank you so much for any and all help.
 
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CountryMile

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Bummer to hear I've been letting it rest for no reason. So as soon as it's stopped fermenting as long as its an ale I can transfer it into the keg? Except for the fact in this case I'm wanting the fruit to infuse into the flavor. Thank you very much for your help. I appreciate it.
 

Kickass

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No experience with pawpaw but a few things you have on your side: Alcohol, low ph, and if submerged, no O2 exposure. These will slow decomposition. So it’ll probably last longer in your beer than on your counter top. I typically go about a week if I fruit a beer.

And as mentioned, probably no need for a D-rest. It’s more of a cold ferment necessity.
 
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CountryMile

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Thank you both very much for your help. I've learned a lot between fruit addition, DR, etc. If I may ask one more question, the fruit soaking for a week. Does that include any fermentation period? Or does the one week start once fermentation stops? Thank you both again. I greatly appreciate it.
 

Jag75

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Normally I will add fruit when fermentation is almost complete. I let it sit for a week or so before I package . As long as it's done fermenting because you don't want bottle bombs.
 

lumpher

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Diacetyl rest is really only needed for fermentation in the 50's. I ferment my ales at 16.2C, 61-62f, and no D-rest needed.
 

Rish

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Bummer to hear I've been letting it rest for no reason. So as soon as it's stopped fermenting as long as its an ale I can transfer it into the keg? Except for the fact in this case I'm wanting the fruit to infuse into the flavor. Thank you very much for your help. I appreciate it.
I find that my ales, while they may not need it, benefit from a couple of weeks or more of rest. Yeasts will clean up, settle out (clearer beer if that matters to you) and flavors develop.
 

lumpher

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Most ales do benefit from letting the flavors blend in and meld for a while. Have you ever tasted a dish that tastes better after it ages some? Some beers are better fresh, like hefe's and ipa's. Some are better aged, like stouts, reds, lagers, etc. Don't think you've been wasting time packaging. Think of it as bulk aging, to let them blend and get better.
 
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