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EZFrag

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I brewed a lager kit from Austin. I did it in December. I moved it to secondary, everything fine. Christmas and family obligations happened, and didn't have time to keg it. It's been in my fermenting fridge at 43 degrees. When I went to look at it, it looked liked some stuff was growing on top of it. Is this batch savable? Or Dump it?

Before I get hammered, I did look through a lot of the links in the sticky thread. I didn't look at everyone of them, and the ones I arbitrarily looked at did not apply to my problem For those of you with the time, expertise, and kindness to offer your opinion, i thank you.
 

aiptasia

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Save it. If you can skim off whatever growth is on top of the beer, do it with a fine mesh net or some cheese cloth (even a coffee filter). Avoid as much contact with the beer as you can and be sure to sanitize the net.

I'm betting it's fine. A simple taste will tell you if it's caught an infection in the secondary. If it tastes fine, no worries. If it tastes funky, start over. It won't kill you to sample a sip. Next time, don't use a secondary fermentation step unless you are dry hopping or adding some adjuncts to the beer.
 

unionrdr

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He said he brewed a lager,& doesn't that require lagering off the yeast? I've been studying all this lager stuff here & there. Besides diacytl rests,& what not.
 

Yooper

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He said he brewed a lager,& doesn't that require lagering off the yeast? I've been studying all this lager stuff here & there. Besides diacytl rests,& what not.
Yes, generally it is better to lager off of the yeast. A few brewers on the forum are doing it, and they say with good results, but I think a lagering of 12 weeks or so would give a "yeasty" taste to the beer and a lager should be super clean and without any yeast character at all.

I think the picture is too bad for me to really tell what's going on, but it sure looks like too much headspace and that some mold or something took hold.
Also, 43 degrees is pretty warm. I think my food fridge is 39 degrees. That could be another issue.
 
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