Quantcast

First Lager

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

hawkeyes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
244
Reaction score
0
Location
Quad Cities
Hello,

I just brewed my first lager yesterday and I have some questions. My instructions said to wait 12-36 hours until you see signs of fermentation. Then slowly move to a cool temperature of 50-55 degrees (about 1 degree per hour).

1. I pitched the yeast at about 4 PM yesterday. I put the carboy down in the basement at about 66 degrees. I checked before bed time and didn't see any sign of Fermentation so I decided to wait until morning. I checked it again at 9 AM this morning, and it clearly had started, probably been going most of the night I would imagine. So I moved it to my chest freezer w/ temperature controller. Did I wait too long before I moved it to the cooler spot?

2. My chest freezer w/ temperature controller is about 50 degrees. Is it OK to set the carboy in there and be done? The instructions said, slowly cool the temperature about 1 degree per hour. Do I need to open my chest freezer and slowly drop the temperature from like 60 down to 50? Or is it OK right at 50 degrees?

Thanks! :mug:
 

osagedr

Recovering from Sobriety
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
2,513
Reaction score
123
Location
Winnipeg
If you clearly have fermentation then there is no problem just putting it at 50 degrees. It will cool off slowly and fermentation will proceed (I presume you pitched enough yeast). It probably doesn't matter much that you waited overnight. The "1 degree per hour" stuff is hooey IMO; just someone covering their butt in the instructions to make sure you get fermentation

FWIW I did a 1.085 doppelbock yesterday and pitched slurry at 44 degrees, where it will stay until d-rest time in a week or so. I don't expect to see any activity until tomorrow morning. With lagers, you learn to pitch enough yeast and wait.
 

PT Ray

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
1,383
Reaction score
14
Judging by the instructions it sounds like you're doing a Coopers European Lager or Pilsener. If not, the same logic applies. They only come with 7 grams of yeast which isn't enough to start fermentation at cooler temps so they direct you start warmer to ensure a good start and gradually bring down the temps. If you bring it down too quick you risk halting fermentation.

It's not ideal but it works. What it will do is give you some good slurry to start another batch at the target fermentation temp.
 

944play

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2008
Messages
2,725
Reaction score
49
Location
Portland
What it will do is give you some good slurry to start another batch at the target fermentation temp.
Quoted for truth. A big cake of lager yeast represents a panoply of brewing options.
 

Tiber_Brew

It's about the beer.
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 21, 2010
Messages
2,543
Reaction score
273
Location
Upper Peninsula
osagedr said:
True, provided it is a strain you want to work with!
Agreed, you have to line up your brewing correctly to make good use of the cake. My problem with that is my lager fridge is then being used to lager the previous batch, so it isn't at ~50f anymore for the next batch. If you have the means to line that process up right, it's a good way to make easy use of fresh lager yeast.

TB
 
OP
hawkeyes

hawkeyes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2011
Messages
244
Reaction score
0
Location
Quad Cities
Judging by the instructions it sounds like you're doing a Coopers European Lager or Pilsener. If not, the same logic applies. They only come with 7 grams of yeast which isn't enough to start fermentation at cooler temps so they direct you start warmer to ensure a good start and gradually bring down the temps. If you bring it down too quick you risk halting fermentation.

It's not ideal but it works. What it will do is give you some good slurry to start another batch at the target fermentation temp.
I'm doing a pilsner with Wyeast American Lager 2035. What exactly is slurry?
 

PT Ray

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
1,383
Reaction score
14
What exactly is slurry?
Short for yeast slurry. Its what's left in the bottom of the fermenter after fermentation. Well, it's actually yeast and trub. In the case of lagers it's really a shame not to utilize this because you now have more then enough yeast needed for another batch without having to worry if you made a big enough starter.

My problem with that is my lager fridge is then being used to lager the previous batch, so it isn't at ~50f anymore for the next batch.
Nothing dictates that the first batch can't sit a couple weeks longer at 50 to accommodate another fermenter.
 

Tiber_Brew

It's about the beer.
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 21, 2010
Messages
2,543
Reaction score
273
Location
Upper Peninsula
PT Ray said:
Nothing dictates that the first batch can't sit a couple weeks longer at 50 to accommodate another fermenter.
Exactly what I've done in the past, and no complaints. I still wish I had another separate fridge for lagering and keep a dedicated ferment fridge, but it works. Since I do 10 gal batches, it gets crowded in there, but it all fits if I keg the previous batch and slide the kegs towards the back and put the carboys in.

TB
 

boostsr20

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2010
Messages
804
Reaction score
16
Location
Michigan
There apparently is any real downside to lagering in the primary either....
 

osagedr

Recovering from Sobriety
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
2,513
Reaction score
123
Location
Winnipeg
There apparently is any real downside to lagering in the primary either....
I don't know if I'd do this, depending on the lager. A lot (but obviously not all) lager styles are quite light with delicate flavour. Reading "New Brewing Lager Beer" and as I read it Noonan states you should remove your yeast from the cake at the end of primary fermentation.
 

Latest posts

Top