First lager attempt fermentation temperature

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lumbergh

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I am looking to brew something this summer and ferment with lager yeast for the first time. I have fermentation temp control (mini fridge) that I will be using as ambient house temps are 77-ish in the summer. I have read about half of the warm fermented lager thread.

For my first attempt at a lager, would it be best to ferment at typical lager temps or try warmer (somewhere in the 60s) temperatures?
 

marc1

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I am looking to brew something this summer and ferment with lager yeast for the first time. I have fermentation temp control (mini fridge) that I will be using as ambient house temps are 77-ish in the summer. I have read about half of the warm fermented lager thread.

For my first attempt at a lager, would it be best to ferment at typical lager temps or try warmer (somewhere in the 60s) temperatures?

If you have the ability to easily ferment in the 50s, why not? Try some batches with cooler fermentation, then try some warmer if you want.
 

MHBT

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I know lots of people ferment lagers on the warmer side or under pressure warm and still get drinkable clean beer, i have tried with 34/70 it does work but i find chilling wort to 43-45 pitching yeast and allowing to rise to 50f is the best way to go , this is just my experience and opinion, to me when i brew my Pilsner i am patient, not a fan of fast lagers, i would pitch cold, ferment cold then lager really cold, i made my best Pilsners this way , if i want a fast turnaround beer i brew a ale
 

FloppyKnockers

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I love lagers! I hate lagering. It's a game of patience that I don't have. I like how I can turn an ale around in two weeks, but lagers take at least two months or more.

My general lager schedule goes something like this:
Make wort.
Chill wort to pitch temp. For me, this is the high side of the lager yeast ideal temp (high ideal for lager, low ideal for ale is my thing) probably around 58°.
Ferment for two weeks.
Transfer to secondary (the only time I ever do)
Slowly drop temp. about 2° - 3° per day until it gets down to around 34°.
This is where the patience comes in - forget about it for at least a month. The longer, the better, but I normally don't wait longer.
About 3 days before kegging I will add gelatin - 1/4 tsp/5 gallons dissolved.
Keg
Carb
Enjoy

As far as room-temp fermentation - I have done that too. No lagering, of course, but it turns out really good. Definitely a different flavor, but not in a bad way. Kinda hard to explain. The best way to experience it is to make a lager, bottle a couple to put in the fridge (more lagering), then make a room-temp version of the same recipe. Now you can compare side by side.
 

Beholder

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Each yeast is different, so I would suggest to focus in on the one you intend to use and search on it. Lagers are typically good to start on the lower end of the manufacturers recommended range and bring it up through fermentation then finish with a diacetyl rest with a couple points to go. But for specific temperatures and times, you’ll get better guidance once you have a specific yeast in mind.
 

MHBT

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Each yeast is different, so I would suggest to focus in on the one you intend to use and search on it. Lagers are typically good to start on the lower end of the manufacturers recommended range and bring it up through fermentation then finish with a diacetyl rest with a couple points to go. But for specific temperatures and times, you’ll get better guidance once you have a specific yeast in mind.
Very good point, the yeast selection should be taken into account to be clear on my previous post i now only use wlp German lager830 or German bock833 so works for what i do
 
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lumbergh

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I will be kegging. I'm leaning towards a märzen or festbier to have around Oktoberfest time. I haven't decided on a yeast, but will probably do 34/70 or MJ Cali lager but am open to liquid yeast as I just built a stir plate.
I'm not in a rush to drink as I get growler club beer every week which is plenty on it's own.
 

MHBT

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I will be kegging. I'm leaning towards a märzen or festbier to have around Oktoberfest time. I haven't decided on a yeast, but will probably do 34/70 or MJ Cali lager but am open to liquid yeast as I just built a stir plate.
I'm not in a rush to drink as I get growler club beer every week which is plenty on it's own.
You have time, I highly recommend the cool route
 

Spundit

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I would do your first one (or few) traditionally in the 50-55 range. Double the yeast etc etc. This will give you something to compare your future batches against.

Over the last 2 years I have decided that I prefer 34/70 fermented on the warmer side 60-63. One packet. Advantages include less yeast needed (one packet), less sulfur, less lag time before fermentation starts, quicker fermentation. The yeast just seems happier and I cannot tell the difference in taste. This is my experience with my system and recipes. YMMV
 

brewmaster2

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I am looking to brew something this summer and ferment with lager yeast for the first time. I have fermentation temp control (mini fridge) that I will be using as ambient house temps are 77-ish in the summer. I have read about half of the warm fermented lager thread.

For my first attempt at a lager, would it be best to ferment at typical lager temps or try warmer (somewhere in the 60s) temperatures?
I tried the Omega Lutra Kveik Yeast 071 on three different lager beers and they came out pretty darn good. You can do this at 85 degrees with this yeast. If you ever get a chance give it a try. You make a lager at high temps and in the same time as an ale.
 

Beermeister32

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Since you have a temperature controlled fermentation chamber, makes sense to use it doing a traditional lager with traditional lager yeast. My favorite is WLP833. Pitch a good size starter at 48F and ferment at 50F. Dry W34/70 is also excellent and easy for brewers, 2 packs for most batches.
 

brewmaster2

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Exactly what i was thinking, you can make a great tasting “lager like” beer but its not a true lager
Yes, your right, not a true lager but, if you like a lager and just don't have the equipment to make one this does give you the opportunity to make a good beer and enjoy a lager like beer with what equipment you have. At least if you don't have the room, the budget or the time to lager, you do have a option. If you never made one with the Omega yeast give it a try and check it out, it is pretty good.
 

MHBT

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Yes, your right, not a true lager but, if you like a lager and just don't have the equipment to make one this does give you the opportunity to make a good beer and enjoy a lager like beer with what equipment you have. At least if you don't have the room, the budget or the time to lager, you do have a option. If you never made one with the Omega yeast give it a try and check it out, it is pretty good.
Absolutely
 
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