First Brew - Irish Stout. Questions about exposure to low temperatures.

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The Norse Druid

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Hello, everyone! First off, I'm excited to have found this community! But here's what the situation is.

Got gifted a Craft-a-Brew Irish Stout kit by a friend, and I've got the proto-beer in the carboy for primary fermentation. I'm concerned, though, because I didn't keep a close enough eye on the temp in the closet I've had it in, so we've potentially had up to a few days in the low-to-mid 50's. I've done some reading on other posts and know there are a lot of factors that affect yeast activity at certain temperatures.

My question is, now that I've moved it to a space in a more ideal temperature range, should I do anything additionally to wake my yeast back up? Or will the rise in temperature do the work for me, and just add some time to my ferment? I've considered giving it a stir, but would prefer not to run the risk of contamination.

Thanks for your time, y'all!
 

McKnuckle

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Timing goes along with temperature in terms of figuring out the impact of a change. When did these dips into the 50s occur - day one or day ten? The yeasts of Great Britain and Ireland are likely to take a nap in the low 50s; in fact, some breweries intentionally cool the beer to that range at the end of primary, in order to promote settling.

Chances are, though, that raising the temp will be enough to prompt any settled yeast back into action. You do have to employ some patience with that, and lose any adherence to a published schedule, as may be found in the kit instructions. Those would go out the window.

I'd say that your instincts about waiting are correct, and kudos for not stirring or otherwise opening the container. But you could swirl the yeast if the fermenter allows you to hold and jostle it in that manner.
 
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The Norse Druid

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The low temperatures would have occurred in the first 5 days of brewing, most likely days 3-5.

And I should be able to give it a good swirl without breaking anything, that sounds perfect! Thanks so much for your reply. I'm very excited to see the results, whatever happens! Haha.
 

lumpher

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Leave it alone. The warmer temps will wake it up and it will ferment just fine.
 

RM-MN

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The low temperatures would have occurred in the first 5 days of brewing, most likely days 3-5.

And I should be able to give it a good swirl without breaking anything, that sounds perfect! Thanks so much for your reply. I'm very excited to see the results, whatever happens! Haha.

With most ale yeasts, the bulk of the fermentation would have been done by the end of day 3 if the temperature was proper for fermentation. Your cooler temps probably have little effect on the beer. Taking a hydrometer reading would let you know if your beer completed fermentation or if there is more to be done. Let us know what the reading was and we can give better advice.
 
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