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filtration system: plate filter ?

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nachov

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Hi folks,


I´d like to buy a filtration system; and I´m wondering which one is the best.

I'm thinking about a plate filter (with pads) or cartridge filter.
I could consider DM filter as well; but maybe it´s too much of an hassle.

I specially like plate filters.
They seem reasonably cheap and do the job well.
But I´ve heard some stories about leaking plates.

Besides, I was wondering if I could use such a system to filter and bottle straight away. I mean just with using 1 source keg (instead of using 1 source and 1 receiving keg): I would plug my counter-pressure tubing to the "out" inlet of the filter; and counter-fill just as I would normally do.

I´m wondering if the plates would stand the pressure when the "beer" tap is closed. Plus, I believe the plates are supposed to filter with no interruption.
So, that could damage the filtering bed which has been created during the filtration.

I´ve never used filtering plates before, so I would welcome any suggestion and comments.

The thing is that I only have 1 corny keg at the moment.
So, I would prefer to bottle straight away (instead of buying a new corny keg).

Cheers!
 

VladOfTrub

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I went from three cartridge filters in series, to a Super Buono and now use three 12X12 tri plates in series, an high pressure pump, pressure gauges and a bypass if the plates foul. The results are exceptional. Unless you buy an expensive multi-plate, pressures above 25 pounds will cause the beer to leak from plastic plates, like the one Super Buono produces. Are you placing the beer in a keg and then filtering the beer as it leaves the keg? Here's what happens with a plastic plate, when starting with a 10 micron course filter. As the filter begins to foul, more pressure has to be applied to the keg. What happens next is, due to pressure drop through the filter, the high pressure CO2 goes into solution and begins to foam in the plates. If the beer in the keg is already carbed up, it foams more as pressure drop occurs. So, if you are planning to use CO2 to push the beer through the plates, expect some foam. Here's the best things to do, that works very well. Producing clean beer is the 1st thing and use some kind of finings in the boiler. Then, pump the beer out of the secondary, through the filter, into the cornie, using a 30 micron filter. The beer will be quite clear leaving the filter, but will cloud up again. Let the beer in the corny settle down at 30 degrees. After settling, filter again using a 3 micron. If you are trying to remove yeast a .1 micron is needed. After filtering down to the point of yeast removal, due to losses, you might have a couple of gallon or so of beer left out of 5 gallons. What I use now is a brewers vacuum system along with tri-plates. A vacuum is drawn in the secondary fermenter. The reduction of pressure causes CO2 to come out of suspension. Once, CO2 is reduced the beer falls bright, drastically, reducing aging time. After settling, CO2 is used to break the vacuum and to keep the filter pump from pulling a vacuum in the secondary. The beer is kept from air during filtering. Then, it can be easily filtered, with much less fouling of the plates. When you figure in the price of a pump and buy the right filter, the word cheap is nonexistent. If you want to be drinking beer quickly, without letting nature do it's thing, filtering is the way to go. But, having patients and by using some kind of clearing agent, might be a better choice. Regarding cartridge using spun filters. That's the type filter system I started with, using 3 filters in series. Starting with a 30 micron, then to a 10 and final through a 3, will give very good results, with little foaming. I'm not sure what possessed me to spend 400 shekels on a Super Buono. Shiny things, perhaps. Again, the problem comes when you try to clear the canisters and filters that are loaded with beer, using CO2. A lot of foaming can happen. Figure on losing a gallon or so of beer. That type of filter system might be a better choice for bottling, at least beer doesn't spew out of the canisters and they can take higher pressures. The system works better than the Super Buono. You might be better off investing in an extra corny and allow nature to work. Good luck with whatever your choice is.
 

BigFloyd

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If you're planning to bottle-carbonate, how will that happen if you've filtered out the yeast? If super-duper clear beer is really important to you, you'll need to filter to the keg and force carb.

If you haven't yet tried cold crashing (with or without gelatin), I'd suggest trying that first before jumping off into filtering. I crash my primaries 5-7 days at 35*F before racking to keg or bottling bucket. That, along with using Whirlfloc at 10 min left in the boil, produces beer clear enough that I often get asked what I do to filter it.
 
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nachov

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I like all the options you´ve come up with.

The Super Buono is awesome.
But it´s definitely out of my budget.

I might consider buying a new corny keg and 3 cartridge spun filters.
But the cheapest option would be cold crashing + gelatin.

I did some experiments with cider making 6 months ago;
I got crystal clear cider with cold crashing for a couple of days;
and then adding gelatin literally filtered the cider within 1 hour.
Starting from a very cloudy hazy cider, it even got rid of the cold-haze.

I'm planning to cold-condition my brew in my secondary (5 gal carboy glass) for 1 week (or more); then transfer to my keg and prime it. Then let it sit for 2 weeks or more.
I believe even after 2 weeks cold-crashing, there is still some yeast in suspension to carb the brew.

I'm not planning on filtering too fine. Otherwise, I might lose all the benefits from natural carbonation. Plus, I don't want to remove some of the good stuff as well for the sake of clarity. I like my brew with natural carbonation. But, I've got to make a choice between super clarity and natural carbonation.

I'd be happy with just a decent clarity. It doesn't matter if there is some yeast sediment in the bottle.

I think I'll go with cold-crashing + gelatin (and probably Whirlfloc at 10 min to the boil).
 
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nachov

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Hi Vlad,

I´m trying to figure out that part:

What I use now is a brewers vacuum system along with tri-plates.
A vacuum is drawn in the secondary fermenter.
The reduction of pressure causes CO2 to come out of suspension.
Once, CO2 is reduced the beer falls bright, drastically, reducing aging time.
After settling, CO2 is used to break the vacuum and to keep the filter pump from pulling a vacuum in the secondary.
The beer is kept from air during filtering. Then, it can be easily filtered, with much less fouling of the plates.

That might create a lot of pressure on your plates? (due to pressure difference)
So, the CO2 might foam up and splash around your plates.
Does the splash prevent the filter from clogging up?

Is that the reaction you want to achieve?
 

alha

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I know this is a little bit of an old thread, but I just got a promo email from Midwest Supplies, so was on their site looking at the Draft Brewer Flex Keg System. It looks interesting, but would be nice if I could use my own kegs and just buy their regulator setup. It would be great for taking 5 gals to the neighbors next summer for their regular gatherings, though. One other thing I came across while clicking around their site was a cartridge filter setup. It was around $60, and had decent reviews. I thought I'd hit the forum here to see what others use, as I expected there to be many options, many probably more expensive, but more effective as well.

I came across this thread, and after reading it, tried looking for either Super Buono or 12X12 tri plates, first on Midwest supplies and Northern Brewers sites, and then just in Google. Strangely, I couldn't find them, even on Google? Only mention was this thread. Could someone please point me in the right direction for both of these filter types, so I can evaluate them a little more closely? Links would be great, as it was weird that Google came up empty. Thanks guys!

*edit* While searching around the web for beer filters, I did come across this: http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/493932O/3mtm-zvs-and-zms-series-single-filter-sanitary-filter-housings.pdf?fn=3M%20ZVZ%20and%20ZMS%20Series.pdf. Is this the "Ultimate" type of filter setup? I can't imagine it's cheap, even in the convenient 10" size? ;) More (presumably inexpensive?) options from 3M: http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/3M-Purification-Inc/3MPI-US/Applications/~/Air-and-Liquid-Filter-Applications-Catalog/Beer-Filtration?N=8694725&rt=r3. I found a wealth of filtering info on this commercial brewing page: http://www.probrewer.com/library/filtration/filter-media-and-equipment/
 
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