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Filtering

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Hey guys. As my first batch is nearing bottling time questions have been asked about the amount of sediment that will be in the bottom of the bottle when i crack it open after a couple weeks of waiting. I plan on priming my beer all at once then transfering to the bottles and capping. Is there a way to filter the beer so there will be no sediment using this method, when would i do it and with what would i use.
 

smorris

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If you want to filter you need to keg. You need the yeast in the bottle to make the CO2 and then it falls out. In a keg you pressurise the system and force the gas into solution.
 
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smorris said:
If you want to filter you need to keg. You need the yeast in the bottle to make the CO2 and then it falls out. In a keg you pressurise the system and force the gas into solution.
I kind of thought that was the situation, but thanks for the clarification. Where can I learn how to do kegging. is it something that can be easily done and cheaply.
 

Janx

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Poke around on this board and the net in general. Kegging is much easier than bottling for a number of reasons. The hard part is the equipment investment and/or scrounging for equipment involved.

www.morebeer.com has all the kegging equipment you need. No affiliation.

Also, it's your first batch. Wait and see how badly the sediment really bums you out. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale has yeast sediment in the bottles from natural conditioning as do many fantastic beers. Just pour a bottle into a glass in one smooth motion and leave the last little bit and you'll have a glass of yeast-free beer.

I keg exclusively, but mostly because I don't want to wash bottles, not because a little yeast bothers me. It's good for ya! Cheers! :D
 

bikebryan

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Jeffs-a-brewin said:
I kind of thought that was the situation, but thanks for the clarification. Where can I learn how to do kegging. is it something that can be easily done and cheaply.
When I started brewing, I was at a brewpup. When I brewed there, I bottled the 15 gallon batches.

When I decided to do this at home, I also decided to start kegging it. I have no regrets, but to answer you questions regarding it:

1. Kegging is easy and not hard to do. Instead of bottling, you rack from your fermenter (primary, or preferably a secondary) into the keg. It's a good idea after you close up the keg to open the pressure relief and blow CO2 into the keg and up through the release valve to purge the headspace of regular air, so you get the oxygen out! If the beer is not already chilled, that's next. Once the beer is chilled, hook up your CO2 line, dial up the pressure you need to get the desired amount of carbonation (you get tables to give you this number), and wait five to seven days. That's it

2. Is it cheap? No. You need at least one keg. Most homebrewers use five gallon cornies because they are easily available, hold a typical homebrew batch and are easy to clean. You'll also need a CO2 cylinder, pressure hosing from it to your keg(s), and serving taps/beverage line of the appropriate length for your brew and carbonation level.

3. One other caveat: you'll probably need a dedicated refrigerator or chest freezer just for your kegs. They take up way to much space for you to use your regular kitchen fridge. Further, if you want to use a chest freezer, you'll need a temp controller so you don't burn out the freezer in less than six months!

When I got into kegging, the initial outlay for the CO2 cylinder, kegs (I got two premium reconditioned ones), a C02 fill, and all the hosing/taps set me back around $260. Add to that the cost of a good used refrigerator (a good deal at $140) and you can't say that it was a "cheap" conversion. The good thing is that it was a one time expense, though.

I do bottle occasionally. Sometimes I miscalculate on ferment times and a brew is ready to be moved from secondary before I have a keg empty, cleaned and ready. Sometimes I bottle to give it away. Other times I bottle because I just want to.

Kegging is easier, but it's not cheap. Still, I prefer it to bottles any day!
 
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