Filtering? Why no love round here...?

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butterpants

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Before you jump my ass, I'm just wondering why there seems to be a general disdain for the idea of filtering to get clear beer? Centrifuge is ok but filter bad? .... both physical processes. Fining with goop ok? .... a chemical process.

It seems like filtering can be done (assuming you keg) with little extra investment and works well without any exogenous goodies added to your brew. Why aren't more homebrewers doing it?
 

Xpertskir

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Why should I be? It's more work and expense for a result I am already getting(clear beer). Also, Id like to keep all the hop oils in the beer.
 
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butterpants

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Why should I be? It's more work and expense for a result I am already getting(clear beer). Also, Id like to keep all the hop oils in the beer.
I've never heard about it removing hop oils... do tell
 

Brulosopher

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Too much work. My beer clears just fine on its own.
 

Rockn_M

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For me it's because I'm lazy. Well not lazy but with working 60+hrs a week and having a 6month old it's hard to find extra time. When I keg I can start draining into the keg and walk away for a few min and come back with no issues.
 

LandoLincoln

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Before you jump my ass, I'm just wondering why there seems to be a general disdain for the idea of filtering to get clear beer? Centrifuge is ok but filter bad? .... both physical processes. Fining with goop ok? .... a chemical process.

It seems like filtering can be done (assuming you keg) with little extra investment and works well without any exogenous goodies added to your brew. Why aren't more homebrewers doing it?
Well, it's kind of a pain to do it. And the filters aren't cheap.

Whirlfloc tablets and cold crashing work great to get you super clear beer. Lot less hassle. Cheaper.
 
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butterpants

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Whirlfloc tablets and cold crashing work great to get you super clear beer. Lot less hassle. Cheaper.
I use whirlfloc then fine kegs with geletin. Happy with results.... but I was just wondering see if I'm missing something ... spur on a discussion ya know!
 

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I use whirlfloc in the kettle, but never gelatin or other finings. I just don't want them, nor do I need them.

My beer is "read a newspaper through it" clear, and filtering does strip yeast and flavor out of the beer when you use a fine enough filter. And you really can't filter a cloudy beer anyway- it would clog your pads. So the beer has to be clear before filtering, and then it would be brilliantly clear.

My beer is clear, and unfiltered, and I like it.
 

Jipper

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Filtered beer tastes cleaner and looks better. I just filtered a Kolsch, took a glass around of filtered vs. unfiltered, and 8 out of 8 people that I work with liked the filtered glass better. Maybe it's a placebo effect, but regardless, the filtered beer looked and tasted better to 8 people. I don't filter porters, stouts, wheat beers or belgians. Pales, IPAs, Kolsch and Lagers all go through the rough pads though...

Yes, it's an extra step that takes a little extra time. But remember: A brew day can take 4-8 hours, and fermentation takes at least 1-2 weeks. Is another hour for a better finished product really not worth it?
 

DoctorJones

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+1 for Whirfloc and no filtering. I can read the computer screen through the one I'm drinking now. However, if you like filtering - go for it! I'm in complete agreement that a little extra time is worth a product that you think is superior! :mug:
 

cfonnes

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If I wanted clear beer I would drink bud light.

Seriously though, I could care less if beer is clear.
 
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I filter some of my beers. I keg and cold crash with gelatin and lager, but I'm here to tell you this: filtering makes a beer brilliantly clear.

I don't mess with it much because of the extra step, and I like my beers fine, but all my lagers get filtered. It's really remarkable how clear they are after filtering.

I'm kegging Octoberfests tonight. I'm going to filter just one of the kegs, and then see the difference. I'll try to take some pics and post them later. I'll give them a few weeks in cold storage and we'll see the differences. Yes, I know that lagers are meant to be stored, but filtering is a great way to skip the "lagering".
 

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I'm going to try Biofine CL this weekend. A lot of pro brewers are using it instead of filtering. It's supposed to drop the beer clear in a 48 hour cold crash. I'm trying it on a low flocculating strain. I'd have to crash it for a month to clear it without finings.



Vegan product.
 

LandoLincoln

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I use whirlfloc then fine kegs with geletin. Happy with results.... but I was just wondering see if I'm missing something ... spur on a discussion ya know!
Filtering is good for removing yeast so you can then add some fermentables that you don't want fermented. But you can also accomplish this feat with pasteurization.
 

Soldevi

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I'm wondering how long it takes you guys to get your beer clear. Say after 2 weeks fermentation, then what do you do? Ive had chill haze that takes forever to clear. I personally don't want to wait 4+ weeks for beer to clear in the fridge.
 
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butterpants

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I filter some of my beers. I keg and cold crash with gelatin and lager, but I'm here to tell you this: filtering makes a beer brilliantly clear.

I don't mess with it much because of the extra step, and I like my beers fine, but all my lagers get filtered. It's really remarkable how clear they are after filtering.

I'm kegging Octoberfests tonight. I'm going to filter just one of the kegs, and then see the difference. I'll try to take some pics and post them later. I'll give them a few weeks in cold storage and we'll see the differences. Yes, I know that lagers are meant to be stored, but filtering is a great way to skip the "lagering".
Excellent thank you!
 
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kh54s10

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Never felt the need. Don't want to invest in the equipment for the small improvement. Most of my beers are clear at 3 weeks in primary using Irish Moss. I don't really care if my beers are clear if they taste good. I haven't heard that filtering will improve the taste.
 

boscobeans

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This is an Imperial Nut Brown Ale. Two weeks in the primary after it reached FG and it is as clear as glass. There is distortion in the picture but you can read a book through it.

bosco

PICT0021.jpg
 

bad67z

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For beers I want to be crystal clear I use worflock/irish moss in the boil, cold crash (in the primary) after about 3 weeks of fermenting and cleaning up, and then gelatin when kegged. The first 1/2 pint is cloudy after that it is very clear. My reason for not filtering is I like to have my beer contact as few surfaces as possible.
 

JJFlash

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I have been using the Buon Vino Super Jet Wine Filter ($$) for the past few years on my lightest beers - Belgian Golden Strong and Belgian Tripel. I have also experimented running darker beers up to my Imperial Stout. Here is my thoughts:
1) Pro Brewers use filtering to quickly clear a beer and "rush" the beer to tap.
2) As homebrewers we are not financially concerned about how quickly we get out our beer to tap. I have kegs/barrels that may sit a year+ before they go to tap.
3) Cold temperatures and time work miracles on clearing beer.
4) All the clearing adjuncts seem to work to clear beer - some better than others. I currently use BioFine Clear with good results.
5) Even with these new clearing agents, there is always a layer of "gunk" at the bottom on my kegs. The first 2-3 pints off the keg have very obvious "gunk" flavor to me - don't like it. Clears with the next few pints.
6) On my lightest beers with filtering they are uniform and perfect from first to last pint. Filtering seems to make the beer much more flavor homogenous from start to finish. Especially if you are not rapidly consuming the beer! There remains in these kegs a very thin layer of "gunk" still. However, it is paint thin and does not seem to be an issue. This is with the medium filter - I have tried the fine filter and these clog much more quickly. Fine also produces improved clarity over medium.
7) I can detect no negative attributes to filtering on my beers. Flavor and aroma are well preserved. However, I only make "in your face" Belgian Style beers, nothing subtle brewed here
8) On the Buon the pump does not need to be primed (unlike regular March pumps). So it sucks the beer out of the secondary, thru the pump, and into the keg. I do all transfers under a blanket of CO2. Takes little extra time. I am pleased with the results.
9) Bottom line: As with most additions to my brewery, adds little extra time and makes my beer just a little bit better, to my palate.
The things we do in search of beer perfection. :)
 

JJL

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I'm going to try Biofine CL this weekend. A lot of pro brewers are using it instead of filtering. It's supposed to drop the beer clear in a 48 hour cold crash. I'm trying it on a low flocculating strain. I'd have to crash it for a month to clear it without finings.

Vegan product.
I've used it. It works as advertised. A couple of things to keep in mind. First, the lighter the beer, generally the more you need to use (up to 2 Tbsp). Second, if you are kegging, you will need to discard the first pint or 2 because it creates a lot of heavy sediment.
 

JJL

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I filter some of my beers. I keg and cold crash with gelatin and lager, but I'm here to tell you this: filtering makes a beer brilliantly clear.

I don't mess with it much because of the extra step, and I like my beers fine, but all my lagers get filtered. It's really remarkable how clear they are after filtering.

I'm kegging Octoberfests tonight. I'm going to filter just one of the kegs, and then see the difference. I'll try to take some pics and post them later. I'll give them a few weeks in cold storage and we'll see the differences. Yes, I know that lagers are meant to be stored, but filtering is a great way to skip the "lagering".
What size filter are you using on your lagers? I've been making more lagers lately and I've been thinking about filtering for the same reason.
 

JJL

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Not sure. It's the standard homebrewer's plate filter. It's about 9" round. It can leak somewhat, especially with pressure over 10psi. Does a good job though.
Sorry, meant how fine are the filter pads? Are they 4-5 mic or are they more like 0.5-1 mic?

Edit: Just did a little reading. I guess the pads are rated coarse, medium or sterile. I guess that's my question. Which do you typically use for lagers?
 

Flatspin

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Here's a question about one of our own products haha: Has anyone tried using Clarity Ferm?

http://morebeer.com/products/clarity-ferm-white-labs-single-serve.html

I haven't tried it yet, but one of my co-workers said it worked really well when used in combination with whirlfloc. Any feedback from the forums would be great though!
I've used it many times. Honestly, I still get a little chill haze, especially when using Maris Otter. However, my wife has a gluten allergy and the stuff is pure magic in regards to denaturing the gluten protein. So i'd guess my chill haze is probably caused by something else. I've never used whirlfloc, but that might need to go on my to-do short list.
 
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Sorry, meant how fine are the filter pads? Are they 4-5 mic or are they more like 0.5-1 mic?

Edit: Just did a little reading. I guess the pads are rated coarse, medium or sterile. I guess that's my question. Which do you typically use for lagers?
I think I use the course. It's supposedly a 5 or 7 micron hole size.
 

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I used to filter my beers with the plate filter and "coarse" pads. It worked great, but man, what a pain in the @$$.

I've since switched to irish moss at the tail end of the boil, and cold crashing/gelatin before kegging, followed by a few weeks of lagering (ales too). It takes a bit longer, but to me it's easier, works just as well, and there's less risk of infection.
 

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I have a filter that didn't seem to work well when I tried it. If I were to get another, I'd get the more expensive model. I'm not concerned about cost because I'd only use it on a beer that I want REALLY clear in a very short amount of time. Sometimes a recipe goes south and doesn't clear up very well. So far a couple of weeks in the keg, in the fridge, and then I jump that to a new keg. Seems to work pretty good. I only do that when I think I might want to move the keg for a party.
 
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butterpants

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Here's a question about one of our own products haha: Has anyone tried using Clarity Ferm?

http://morebeer.com/products/clarity-ferm-white-labs-single-serve.html

I haven't tried it yet, but one of my co-workers said it worked really well when used in combination with whirlfloc. Any feedback from the forums would be great though!
This is going into my next couple of beers....have some friends who are really up in arms about gluten (and not allergic). This might let those crazy bastards loosen up a bit and get hammered.
 

Hopper5000

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I have been using clarity-ferm for quite a few of my beers in the past year or so. It seems to work pretty well but I haven't done a side by side with one beer using it and one not. Apparently the heat of fermentation helps the enzyme break down large proteins that can create chill haze. There is some evidence that it also breaks down gluten since that is a large chain protein as well. They are doing more studies apparently to determine what effect this actually has.

My beers tend to turn out very clear except my IPA's. I know that hops can contribute their own haze and I believe that is where this comes from.

I do sometimes cold crash but only when the kegerator is empty as I don't have anything else I can do it in.

As for filtering I don't really want to add additional time to my process and I am generally satisfied with my brews.
 

Randy_Bugger

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My first time using Biofine CL was a success. The dosage was 1ml per gallon. The beer temperature was 68F when Biofine CL was added. Cold crashed for three days. The strain was wy1388 which doesn't drop quickly. The beer was fairly clear at bottling time. I wouldn't call it crystal clear, but it was much clearer than I've ever seen 1388 three weeks after pitching yeast. It will probably pour crystal clear after it's carbed and chilled for a couple days.
 
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butterpants

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The OP has been around message boards for awhile... he knows how they work.
It's all about the discussion.... like sitting at a roundtable filled with experienced and opinionated people and you just get to listen. Priceless
 
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