fermenting advantage, or not??

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mike kennedy

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just wonedering if theres any advantage of fermenting quicker...as in, if i warm my mix hotter, (warmer), than whats recommended, will it go bad??, or am i just speeding up the fermenting proccess??

ive got a big incubator, just wondering if i should use it??

Mike
 

Bobby_M

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Actually you'll make some crappy beer if you ferment hot. I actually prefer to ferment at the lower end of the yeast's temp range. Mid 60's for ales.
 

Drunkensatyr

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*Legal Disclaimer* Saisons do best warm, but other than that....cooler the better.
 

Joker

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Yep keep the fermenting temp around 70 or lower would be better. Fermenting takes as long as it takes. I am actually typing this next to my brew that has been bubbling for almost 2 weeks now. You can't rush great beer.
 
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mike kennedy

mike kennedy

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im just getting antsy about my first brew.

waiting is like standing in line, i hate it
 

malkore

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get used to waiting. the best brewer's are patient people.

good example: Oktoberfest beer...is brewed in March (hence the style 'Marzen') and then gets cold aged until October.

good beer is not like Budweiser, which is rushed from fermenter to store shelf in under a week.
 

gallagherman

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I'd agree with bobby. I am a new brewer too, and my third batch is finishing fermenting. I had my temp too hot for the first day, about 75 d in the bucket, then brought it down. My irish ale has a fruity smell to it now:( - its the ester production during the hotter temps. Sometimes esters are wanted in ales, such as in hefeweizen, but those esters are usually produced by using high ester yeasts, not by cranking the temps. Succeed where I have failed haha, keep it in the 60s:mug:

PS make sure you are taking the temp of the bucket and not the ambient air. I thought the room was 70d so my beer would be 70d too, but while room was 70 the yeasts' metabolic activity bumped the bucket temp to 75!
 

ScubaSteve

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gallagherman said:
I'd agree with bobby. I am a new brewer too, and my third batch is finishing fermenting. I had my temp too hot for the first day, about 75 d in the bucket, then brought it down. My irish ale has a fruity smell to it now:( - its the ester production during the hotter temps. Sometimes esters are wanted in ales, such as in hefeweizen, but those esters are usually produced by using high ester yeasts, not by cranking the temps. Succeed where I have failed haha, keep it in the 60s:mug:

PS make sure you are taking the temp of the bucket and not the ambient air. I thought the room was 70d so my beer would be 70d too, but while room was 70 the yeasts' metabolic activity bumped the bucket temp to 75!
I completely agree. This causes a lot of problems if you don't keep it cool once fermentation starts. For me, 65 is the magic number. Never had a problem yet.
 
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