Fermenter

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goat

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I am looking for some ideas for fementing vessel. I currently use a plastic bucket, because I do not like dealing with the carboy bottle. However I am concerned about quality. My beer is OK but I think it could be better. (extract brewer). Has anyone ever converted a Stainless Steel cooking Pot into a fermenter? Any suggestion on how to make it air tight with the cover?
 

flyangler18

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Why do you suspect the fermenter is the problem? Provided that the plastic pail is food-grade plastic and you haven't had any problems with infection (scratches inside the pail harboring bacteria and other nasties), I'm inclined to think your brewing process/technique needs fine tuning.
 
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goat

goat

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You may be right, but I am just trying to eliminate one possible problem. I understand that Stainless Steel is the best thing to use. I have plenty of soda kegs to convert but I don't know what to do about the blow off.
 

billtzk

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A soda keg is only 5 gallons, which doesn't leave you any room for kraeusen formation in a five gallon batch. It would be ok for 3 to max 4 gallon batches. You'd need a blow off tube for sure, and not just an airlock. Just use a hose that fits on one of the screw-on post threads. It would be better to convert a quarter barrel keg, or you could even use a 1/2 barrel keg. Some people do this. Search the forums.

I haven't heard of anyone who has converted a SS pot, but I wouldn't be surprised. McMaster sells sheets of food grade rubber (Buna-N, Silicone, etc) that you could make a gasket from. You'd have to fashion a clamp for the lid. I don't think an airtight seal is totally necessary though. You just want to make sure the top can't blow off.
 

DutchK9

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I drilled a hole in one of my Cornies lids and put the rubber grommet that came on my fermenting buckets lid on it. Now I can put either an airlock or a blowoff hose on my Cornies lid. I can't remember what size hole it was (maybe 1/2"), but when you pop the grommet out of your lid you can measure the hole and go from there.
 
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goat

goat

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I drilled a hole in one of my Cornies lids and put the rubber grommet that came on my fermenting buckets lid on it. Now I can put either an airlock or a blowoff hose on my Cornies lid. I can't remember what size hole it was (maybe 1/2"), but when you pop the grommet out of your lid you can measure the hole and go from there.
I guess that would be good for secondary.
 

malkore

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Honestly, its not the bucket. If you think its the bucket, go buy a new one for $10.

Otherwise I'd look at your brewing process, sanitizing habits, the water you brew with, the cleaners you use (none should contain perfumes), how well you aerate the wort before pitching, the age of yeast you use (fresh, 6 months old, almost expired?) and things like that.

Its highly unlikely that a clean, sanitized, un-scratched food grade bucket has anything to do with your beer not 'being all it can be'.
 
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goat

goat

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Honestly, its not the bucket. If you think its the bucket, go buy a new one for $10.

Otherwise I'd look at your brewing process, sanitizing habits, the water you brew with, the cleaners you use (none should contain perfumes), how well you aerate the wort before pitching, the age of yeast you use (fresh, 6 months old, almost expired?) and things like that.

Its highly unlikely that a clean, sanitized, un-scratched food grade bucket has anything to do with your beer not 'being all it can be'.

Thanks for the tip. I will look I will look into this.
I just checked a batch and it started at 1.062 and ended at 1.020 and taste very yeasty. Should I secondary it or let it sit? Any suggestions?
 

EvilTOJ

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How old is the batch? It's probably still very young. Let it sit and wait.
 
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goat

goat

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Honestly, its not the bucket. If you think its the bucket, go buy a new one for $10.

Otherwise I'd look at your brewing process, sanitizing habits, the water you brew with, the cleaners you use (none should contain perfumes), how well you aerate the wort before pitching, the age of yeast you use (fresh, 6 months old, almost expired?) and things like that.

Its highly unlikely that a clean, sanitized, un-scratched food grade bucket has anything to do with your beer not 'being all it can be'.
I am not new to this but I was never showed the proper way. My guess is that my santizing habits are not as good as they should be. Would you mind telling me how you clean your bucket and kegs to assure they are clean?
 
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