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Fermentation Temps

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BrooZer

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Is about 62-63 too cold for an ale?

I put a towel around my carboy last night dipped in water so it didnt get above 70 or so while I was sleeping. This morning it was at about 62 or 63. I am letting it warm to about 66 now.

The dry yeast package says its good from 55 to 70. Should I leave the towel be or warm it above 65 or so as it seems to be a rule of thumb?

Thanks!

Oh and fermentation has started.
 

Brett3rThanU

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You're fine, mine is currently fermenting at 62F and is bubbling away. The yeast I'm using is good 57F-70F (Nottingham).
 

Blender

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It will likely ferment a bit slower at 62 but it should work well, I would warm it some when it slows down vs. when it is fermenting strong.
 

Got Trub?

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Ditto what Jaybird said. You're going to get beer but it may be cleaner tasting then you want depending on the beer style. For example if you are brewing an English bitter or ale you want some of those fruity ester flavours that come from fermentation on the warmer end of the yeasts temp range.

GT
 
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BrooZer

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Its an irish red with nottingham dry yeast.
 

ohiobrewtus

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It's a bit on the low side for some Ale yeasts, but with Nottingham you'll be fine.
 

DeathBrewer

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with nottingham, that's absolutely fine. i keep most of my ales at 60-65F and don't have any problems. it just may take a little longer to ferment out, but it will taste cleaner.
 
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BrooZer

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DeathBrewer said:
with nottingham, that's absolutely fine. i keep most of my ales at 60-65F and don't have any problems. it just may take a little longer to ferment out, but it will taste cleaner.

Awesome, i think I like clean over fruity anyway. I wish i could make lager beers.
 

hardrain

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My temp has been right around 70, sometimes up to 75. I know this is too high but i have a small apartment and even with the windows wide open I can't seem to get the place any cooler than 68...has to do with the heat in the building.

Any suggestions for cooling the area around the fermenter?

Beer is currently in a secondary on hardwood...so I'm hoping that the floor is helping to keep the actual temp of the beer a couple degrees cooler than the air around it.
 
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BrooZer

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hardrain said:
My temp has been right around 70, sometimes up to 75. I know this is too high but i have a small apartment and even with the windows wide open I can't seem to get the place any cooler than 68...has to do with the heat in the building.

Any suggestions for cooling the area around the fermenter?

Beer is currently in a secondary on hardwood...so I'm hoping that the floor is helping to keep the actual temp of the beer a couple degrees cooler than the air around it.
Get a tupperware or some other container that has a larger diameter than your carboy. put the carboy in the container. Put a towel around the carboy resting in the container. pour cold water in the container. The towel should soak up the water and begin to cool the carboy through wicking.
 

DeathBrewer

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BrooZer said:
Awesome, i think I like clean over fruity anyway. I wish i could make lager beers.
try a cream ale or a steam beer at that temperature and you'll get a wonderfully crisp lager-ale hybrid. i have some recipes that turned out excellent if you'd like to give them a shot.
 

DeathBrewer

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BrooZer said:
Get a tupperware or some other container that has a larger diameter than your carboy. put the carboy in the container. Put a towel around the carboy resting in the container. pour cold water in the container. The towel should soak up the water and begin to cool the carboy through wicking.
if this doesn't work, build a son-of-fermenation chiller. It makes a huge difference. not really using mine right now during the cool season, but it works wonders in the summer.
 
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BrooZer

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DeathBrewer said:
try a cream ale or a steam beer at that temperature and you'll get a wonderfully crisp lager-ale hybrid. i have some recipes that turned out excellent if you'd like to give them a shot.

I like a good Anchor Steam, hook me up! Whats your favorite one?

I do normally extract and steam but can convert most recipes using beer recipator.
 
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