Fermentation Temperature

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DanBeamer

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Hey Folks ,

Giving my home brew a second chance- My first coopers kit I tried and the beer tasted like green apples ( this may be acetaldehyde? ). Despite the the hydrometer reading consistently for 2 days and letting the beer ferment for 14 days at around 18 degrees celcius.

Anyways, I bought another can of Coopers IPA and the gent at the shop suggest I add some liquid malt extract (Munton's) 1.3 kg to around 20 litres of total brew.

Anyways, as it is winter in Canada by house is someowhat colder than typical basement around 15-16 degrees during the day.

Will the Ale yeast still ferment at this temperature? I have been wondering about building a heated water bath for the fermenter with an aquarium heater to keep it at 21 celcius where they recommend the beer ferments at.

Anyways let me know what you all think
 
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Hello!
It depends on the type of yeast that came with the kit. Do you know what strain it was?
If Nottingham was the yeast, you should be fine. The temp range on that one can get as low the temps you list; however it may take longer, and it might not start quite as quickly. Another thing to consider is that yeast gives off heat when fermenting, so you might expect to see the fermentation temp rise up to 18-19c on its own.
 
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DanBeamer

DanBeamer

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Hey it’s the yeast that comes with the Coopers IPA can
 

carrsgarage

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I keep my house around 60° F in the winter. I usually ferment in the high fifties to low sixties. I'm usually chilling the fermenter for the first couple of days while the yeast are really going to town and generating heat.
 

mashinary

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If the temp gets too low, I suggest getting some masking tape and a heating pad, and taping it your fermenter.
 

Andrew7447

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There was no temp range on the yeast packet?
There's no way to tell you without knowing what it was.
 

WBB

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It’s a proprietary yeast blend with this kit. Who knows. Get a fermwrap and itc 308. Wrap it around your fermenter along with a few towels and tape the probe with a paper towel cushion to the side. Set around 68-70*F.
 

Northern_Brewer

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The Coopers IPA kit should come with the standard Coopers dry yeast (identify it here) which is allegedly a cousin of Mauribrew 514 and likes it rather warmer than most yeast, ideally it wants at least 21°C liquid temperature. As has been mentioned with 15-16°C air temperature you will see liquid temperatures a bit above that air temp, but it's still on the cool side.

So you can mess about with increasing the temperature, or use a yeast with a more normal temperature range like Nottingham. I'd tend to the latter for the early stages of your brewing career, no point getting lots of kit if you're not happy with the results.
 
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DanBeamer

DanBeamer

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Brilliant , just get different yeast haha that seems like such a great and cheap idea . Will grab some Nottingham , you guys are legends. Will save the coopers yeast for the summer
 

Ninoid

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The yeast that is delivered with the kit can is bad and the question in what condition. It is best to buy some dry yeast (S-04, US-05) separately.
 

Gnomebrewer

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Giving my home brew a second chance- My first coopers kit I tried and the beer tasted like green apples ( this may be acetaldehyde? ).
I'd suggest you go with Nottingham. US05 gives a bit of acetaldehyde at low temperatures, but most drinkers can't taste it (it's under their taste threshold). I pick it up at really, really low levels - for me, it's probably the most undesirable taste in beer (probably because I get horrendous hangovers from small amounts of it). Nottingham doesn't (IME) give it at low temps (but becomes quite oddly estery at high temperatures).
 
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DanBeamer

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Have gone with Nottingham, have 5 gallon Australian IPA going (Coopers kit +1.3 kg of liquid malt extract) and a 2 gallon Amber Ale (Coopers kit plus 500g of dry malt extract). Both pitched with Nottingham that was rehydrated first. They're in my basement, which is generally fairly cool 14-17 Celsius , intend on fermenting for 3 weeks prior to bottling.

The IPA is being transferred to carboy at the end of week 1 from the fermenter.

The Amber stays in the coopers home kit for the duration, but will remove the Kraussen collar at the end of week 1 as well.
 
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DanBeamer

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Here is what the Amber looked like after 24 hours. Haven't opened the fermenter storing the IPA to take a look
 

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DanBeamer

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Here's the amber on day 4 , less foam, assume the vigorous fermentation is slowing down.

Anything I should be on the lookout for? Is the temp too low ? Should I move them somewhere warmer. Or just chill and be happy
 

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Gnomebrewer

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They're in my basement, which is generally fairly cool 14-17 Celsius , intend on fermenting for 3 weeks prior to bottling.

The IPA is being transferred to carboy at the end of week 1 from the fermenter.

The Amber stays in the coopers home kit for the duration, but will remove the Kraussen collar at the end of week 1 as well.
Notty's a good choice at that temperature, it should be good.

I suggest NOT transferring the IPA to secondary - there's really no need and will only expose it to oxygen. If you do want to transfer it, do it on about day 4 or 5 (as the ferment slows down) so there's still active yeast to remove oxygen. Those kits also don't have much hop flavour or aroma - try adding 50g (or more) dry hop to the IPA (citra, centennial, cascade or mosaic would be good choices, but there are plenty of others) if you want a good hop presence.
 
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DanBeamer

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Hmmmm so today would be around day 4 if i was to transfer it. Can it be dry hopped in the carboy? What does that process look like? By 25-50 g of pellets and put them in a stocking? Or is it done a few days before bottling?
 

Gnomebrewer

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Why do you want to transfer it? If there's no reason, don't do it.
You can dry hop in the carboy or bucket. The easiest way is to chuck the pellets straight into the fermenter (no need for a sock unless you're reusing the yeast). You can dryhop anywhere from the day you pitch the yeast to a few days before bottling (different brewers have different preferences). I prefer about day 3 or 4 (while the yeast are still active).
 
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DanBeamer

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Anyone have any experience with galaxy hops? they seem more fruity and less piney--will likely dry hope with these or possibly cascade or citra
 
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