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Fermentation Temperature Fluctuations

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TheFreeman

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Hi,

Does temperature fluctuation effect fermentation and beer quality?

I started brewing this month. After doing some research I setup a 2nd hand fridge with an InkBird temp control as managing a tank with ice was to much of a hassel. Another reason is that where I live its summer and temperature is around 28-32celcius(86)

To reduce some stress of the fridge I have set the target temperature to 18celcius(64.4) on the inkbird with a max temperature of 21.5celcius(70.7), so in short the fridge will kick in at 21.5celcius(70.7) and brings the beer back down to 18(64.4).

Also the beer is normally slightly colder as I measured a sample with a probe since the inkbird themometer is attached to the outside(insulated with layers of foil)

Does a fluctuation of 3.5c(6.3f) effect the fermentation/yeast?

Thanks in advance!
TheFreeman
 

hottpeper13

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short answer is yes. I've been poo pooed by my buddies for using a 2*f differential. One of the functions on the controller is the delay on, that you can set so the compressor doesn't cycle on and off like a yo-yo. I have mine set for 10 min. Most of the time I use my kegerator for fermenting and put a heat wrap and insulation with a controller set to 1*f difference and my fermentations are perfect.
 
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TheFreeman

TheFreeman

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But is the difference noticeable?
 

Northern_Brewer

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Potentially, yes. Certainly for ester-prone strains, that kind of temperature differential will make your yeast produce significantly more esters and other flavours - whether that's a problem depends on the beer, it's kinda normal for traditional British brewing without temp control. There's been a couple of papers that have shown more esters being produced from 60-66F cycles than from fermenting at a steady 70F+
 
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TheFreeman

TheFreeman

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Understood, I will do some more research and adjust the inkbird. Thanks for your help!
 
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