Quantcast

Fermentation temp question...

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Nowuries

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2010
Messages
122
Reaction score
0
Location
Oklahoma City, OK
Ok, so I got my fridge all set up with a ranco single stage. I am fermenting a dry stout using wlp004 at 67°, and I plan on letting it sit in primary for 3 weeks. My question is this, should I leave at 67 the entire time or at some point do I let it go up? I will cold crash the last few days but other than that I have no clue.
Thanks guys!
 

Grizzlybrew

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2009
Messages
1,157
Reaction score
16
Location
Austin
Two things:

first, if you are measuring ambient air, you're fermentation will likely be 5°+ warmer than ambient... keep that in mind.

second, White Labs says this strain produces a slight hint of diacetyl that blah, blah, blah... sounds like something I don't want in my dry stout. Yes, I would let it rise to 70° for a day or two towards the end of fermentation. None of the reviews seem to mention diacetyl as an issue so maybe it's not. But, then again, in a world of hot-fermenting homebrewers, they may be doing an unintentional diacetyl rest.
 

bmick

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2011
Messages
321
Reaction score
27
Location
New York
There is a long, long thread about this over in the yeast & fermentation section (where this should be), and the conclusion is that after the initial stages of fermentation have completed (2-5 days) the ill effects of not maintaining the ideal ferm tempurature will be minimal (as long as there are no wild temp swings, it's not 120 deg, etc.). Personally I can only fit a freezer big enough for 1 carboy in my apt, so my ferms are temp controlled for about 10-14 days, then get stepped up to room temp so I can make room for a new carboy with a new brew. No ill effects from this yet.

As far as the ambient air temp comment, put your temp probe on your carboy, put a rag over it, then tape it on. That will better read the temp of the fermentation going on in the carboy.
 

maida7

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2009
Messages
2,826
Reaction score
50
Location
Asheville, NC
Tape the probe to the side of the fermenter

ideally you start the ferment cool like low 60's. Once the yeast gets going (12-48 hours) allow the temp to rise to your target (in this case 67F). Maintain the target temp (67F) for the most active part of the ferment (first 3-5 days). When the yeast activity slows start to raise the temp slowly (1-4 degrees per day) until you reach 72F. Hold at 72 F until all activity is finished and the beer is fully attenuated. Drop temp slowly (1-4 degrees per day) until it's in the low 60's. Wait until the yeast has fully flocculated and fallen to the bottom of the fermenter. Fermentation is now done and it is time to package.

If you have pitched the proper amounts of healthy yeast, the whole process should take 7-14 days. You can let it sit 3 weeks but I don't think that makes it any better.
 
OP
Nowuries

Nowuries

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2010
Messages
122
Reaction score
0
Location
Oklahoma City, OK
Tape the probe to the side of the fermenter

ideally you start the ferment cool like low 60's. Once the yeast gets going (12-48 hours) allow the temp to rise to your target (in this case 67F). Maintain the target temp (67F) for the most active part of the ferment (first 3-5 days). When the yeast activity slows start to raise the temp slowly (1-4 degrees per day) until you reach 72F. Hold at 72 F until all activity is finished and the beer is fully attenuated. Drop temp slowly (1-4 degrees per day) until it's in the low 60's. Wait until the yeast has fully flocculated and fallen to the bottom of the fermenter. Fermentation is now done and it is time to package.

If you have pitched the proper amounts of healthy yeast, the whole process should take 7-14 days. You can let it sit 3 weeks but I don't think that makes it any better.
Thank you for all the reply's ... as much as I searched I just couldn't seem to find a good answer on this.
I had already taped the probe with a rag over it to the side of the carboy... and the temp sticker on the side of the carboy reads 67/68 even during active fermentation... so no problems there.
 
Top