Fermentation Stalled?

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roxy35

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Hello,

I brewed an American Pale Ale using WLP001. I pitched at 68-69 on Sunday and temp has been maintained at 67 for the last 48 hours since pitched.

24 hours there was very slight movement in the airlock. 1 bubble every 8 seconds or so. I know airlock is not an indicator of fermentation, however it IS an indication that something is happening in there.

36 hours later, no movement in airlock whatsoever.

48 hours later, no movement whatsoever.

I became curious, so I removed the airlock to check for krausen - no krausen. However, when I removed the airlock, I got a massive whiff of pure CO2 - so much that it sort of knocked me back. Is this CO2 a good sign of fermentation? Should I bump the temperature up to about 70-71 to see if this sparks anything?

My OG was 1.059 and I did NOT make a starter, mainly because the directions did not call for one.
 

BobC

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Let it ferment for 3 weeks then take to consecutive FG readings if there the same then bottle/keg. It never hurts to just let it sit and wait. 3 weeks also give yeast time to clean up after themselves and gives you a better beer.
 

urbanmyth

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Take another gravity reading before doing anything. Even a point drop in gravity means fermentation is happening.
 
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roxy35

roxy35

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Is it safe to remove the lid to do this? Sanitation aside, does letting the co2 escape do damage?
 

unionrdr

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Yeah,it's def fermenting. The slow down or lack of airlock activity usually means initial fermentation is done. It slowly ferments down to a stable FG from here. Leave it in primary with the temp it's at now. It'll finish up. The yeast know what to do...
 
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roxy35

roxy35

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Yeah,it's def fermenting. The slow down or lack of airlock activity usually means initial fermentation is done. It slowly ferments down to a stable FG from here. Leave it in primary with the temp it's at now. It'll finish up. The yeast know what to do...
Cool! I guess I was spoiled with my first beer, a Hefeweizen, when I had massive activity for 2 days.
 

unionrdr

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Every brew is different,so no worries,m8. And it'll make more co2 to fill the head space again,just not as fast as during initial fermentation.
 

JLem

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You need a gravity reading to really know what is going on. I suspect things are fine if you had some airlock activity, but only a gravity reading will confirm. No problem taking the lid off and scooping out some beer to test - just be careful and sanitary (I spray down a metal 1/2 c measuring cup with star san and just do a quick dip). The CO2 is more dense than air, so as long as you don't disturb it too much, the CO2 layer should remain relatively intact on top of the beer (and even if you disturb it, things will be fine)
 
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roxy35

roxy35

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I just realized this and should mention it, not sure if it matters:

I was reading about underpitching and I realized that I took my OG AFTER I pitched my yeast (2nd batch, I'm still learning!). I aerated very good before I took it. I then disposed of the sample.

I realize I likely have disposed (albeit a small amount) of viable yeast. Could this be a problem?

I should also note that last night (roughly 56 hours after pitching) I had about 1 bubble every 2-3 seconds. Very subtle, soft bubbles. This morning (about 63 hours post-pitch) I was back to NO airlock activity. It seems it is going back and forth, back and forth. Temp stil being maintained in chamber at 67. Very frustrating!
 

luvinit

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I brewed an american pale ale on sat also,I have exactly the same conditions you described, hardly any airlock activity,but peeking inside I have krausen 2 inches thick on the top so there is something going on, will be patient and take a reading this weekend but plan on leaving in primary at least 3 weeks,then its into a bottle ,good luck with your batch,if there is 1 thing I am learning on this forum its patience pays off..:mug:
 
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roxy35

roxy35

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not yet....but decided to pop the lid to check inside....and wa-la....check out the krausen! Sorry for wasting everyone's time.

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J187

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Your Airlock was not very active, yet CO2 was building up inside the headspace of the fermenter and fermentation was taking place perfectly fine... Did something perhaps clog or partially clog the airlock? Check the opening underneath and see if a bit of sediment or hops or something, dried Krausen, whatever is partially blocking it.
 
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roxy35

roxy35

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I think i solved it.....my air lock was only filled partially, only half way to the fill line...therefore co2 was easily escaping
 
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