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Fermentation Schedules?

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chaps

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Does anyone have a good general purpose Ale fermentation schedule (or specifically for a brown ale)? Im dedicated to figuring out how to setup my inkbird temp controller for an automated schedule so i can have more repeatable results instead of "it was cold for a bit then i turned it up after a while". I checked the zero tolerance wiki but didn't find anything there on temp/time schedule for fermentation. Thanks for any thoughts or resources.

Chaps
 

McKnuckle

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I'm not sure exactly what reference you're hoping to find that is "automated" or repeatable. You can easily produce such a thing yourself.

There's nothing simpler than just setting the Inkbird to a static temperature and letting primary fermentation run to completion. This temp is usually yeast-dependent more so than based on style.

For example, with the tried and true US-05, you might choose to ferment at 65F for 7 days. However, if on day 7 you check gravity and things look done, you can make the next decision - rack, leave it for another couple of days, bump to 68 for a couple of days - etc.

Keep good notes, and if something works well, just repeat the same sequence next time.
 
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chaps

chaps

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I'm not sure exactly what reference you're hoping to find that is "automated" or repeatable. You can easily produce such a thing yourself.

Keep good notes, and if something works well, just repeat the same sequence next time.
I think i asked my question poorly. I want to know what sequence of temperatures/lengths that others have used with success. Also if anyone knows of a good resource for reading up on the effect that fermentation temperature has on beer that would be appreciated.

For example the past few brews I have started the beer "cold" to inhibit the initial burst of off flavors and then let it slowly heat up over the following two weeks. It seems to have been successful. But it could also have just been coincidence. Im hoping more experience brewers that have used a specific fermentation schedule can contribute some wisdom. Alot of what i found on the 'internet' was around making the fermentation finish as fast as possible, which is NOT what im looking for.

Im TERRIBLE about taking notes (but i think my new system will be the winner!), hence why i'm looking for what others have done.
 

SanPancho

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you've pretty much answered your own question. the way to get the cleanest ferment out of any yeast is to have a big pitch of fresh healthy yeast, oxygenate the wort well, and start slow and low and then ramp up the temp/allow to free rise once you hit somewhere in the 50-70% attenuation range.

temp range and attenuation % to start ramp up are strain dependent.
 

apache_brew

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Perhaps this thread was accidently posted in the wrong area, not sure if it has anything to do with gluten free.

I'm guessing you want a set it and forget it type system for your fermentation chamber? Not really sure how you can do this without some sort of PLC that gets inputs from a thermowell in the beer as well as SG readings from something like a Tilt hydrometer. If you're up for doing the research on how to come up with that sort of system, that would be sweet!

  1. Ferment at 65F until SG= 80% attenuation* [=FG-((FG-OG)*.8)] *assuming % attenuation is 100% when your beer reaches terminal FG
  2. Send notification (taste test and manual hydrometer reading)
  3. Raise temperature to 70F until SG= the same value for 2 or 3 days (aka reaches final gravity)
  4. Send notification (taste test and manual hydrometer reading)
  5. Lower temperature to 32F
  6. Sustain 32F for 48 hrs
  7. Send notification (check for clarity and transfer to new vessel (brite tank, keg, etc..))
Sounds like you're on the right track. Don't worry about X number of days for anything. Worry about temperature, gravity readings, and taste. Pitch enough healthy yeast and you'll have the right schedule.
 
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