Fermentation question

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applescrap

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Does anyone know why some beers when I shine a light in the top of the bucket the fermentation top line level was higher and other times it's lower?
Btw this is my hydrometer test the yeast rose and fell i know it fermented

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cilestiok

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I agree but why are some higher

Despite the vague question/topic I'll give it a go. Different yeasts under different conditions will have more or less vigorous fermentations. I hope that's the answer you re looking for.
 
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applescrap

applescrap

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Thank you. Does it indicate or affect quality, alcohol content, etc? Also some ferments smell up basement others dont
 

cilestiok

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Thank you. Does it indicate or affect quality, alcohol content, etc? Also some ferments smell up basement others dont

No it's not an indicator of anything other than how vigorous the fermentation activity was at one time. Yeast are living creatures like you and I so they're only mildly predictable at best, and that's under ideal conditions.
 

flars

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The height of the krausen does not affect quality unless you have fermented to warm for the yeast used. A ferment that is to warm will produce a more vigorous ferment which may result in an increased krausen height, but also produce off flavors in the beer.

ABV is a product of the amount of fermentable sugars in the wort. Mishandling the yeast or a pitch rate that is to low can affect the ABV if the fermentation stalls leaving fermentable sugars in the beer.

Yeasts are different and will produce different aromas as they ferment the wort. Some of these aromas can be strong, like a sulfur smell, but dissipate and will not end up in the finished product. Some of these aromas, when they remain in the beer, are desirable for some styles.
 
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