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Ingo

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Reykjavík, Iceland
Those of you that have been brewing for over 5 years and have tried to brew many or even most types of beer, what has become your favorite drinking beer?

Please do not reply here if you have less than 5 years experience.

I have a theory that many of us come to the same conclusion. I'm not going to say what I think until I've seen some results.

There's a type of beer that's the reason I started brewing and I've seen many seasoned brewers talk about that type as their favorite.
I wanna see how common that is 😊

I just absolutely love that type and wish it had all the nutrition a human body needs 'cause I'd be up for drinking that all day every day 😊
 
Belgian Dark Strong Ale.
Or Russian Imperial Stout.
Or maybe something else entirely; something I haven't even tried to brew yet. Who knows?

BTW, I've been brewing for more than five years, but I really don't consider myself to be all that experienced. Maybe total number of batches brewed would be a better measure than number of years? When I first started I brewed a couple of times a year. Now it probably averages once every couple of months. I'd like to brew more, but life still gets in the way. Even since I retired.
 
I'm gonna fall into the neipa category here for a couple reasons, been brewing for 12 years, pushing the limits of gallons allowed per year legally and it's my favorite to brew (and drink) because of the challenge of perfecting it and the ability to play around with the numerous variations of hops, grainbills, yeasts, water, temperatures, process, and every aspect of brewing. Not that you can't do that with any style, but there are simple beers that I can brew in my sleep and there are ones that take focus. Which leads me to the polar opposite that comes in second place for me which is a British golden ale or pub ale. Clean, smooth, crystal clear.
 
I’ve been brewing for over 5 years. My favorite are lagers. Specifically Marzen

Love that this was the first reply. I too have found over the years that I really love medium to dark lagers like Bock, Maibock, Schwarzbier, Märzen, Baltic Porter, and on and on.

Mmmmmm....
 
Those of you that have been brewing for over 5 years and have tried to brew many or even most types of beer, what has become your favorite drinking beer?

Please do not reply here if you have less than 5 years experience.
How are you defining 5 years?

I've been here for 12 years, I first brewed in 1992.

I'm gluten free, so my go-to is always an apple cider. For beer, I usually go back to sorghum based brow ales.
 
Almost 20 years brewing. English porter and German lagers are my favorites.

What is the style you think experienced brewers gravitate towards?
English bitter 😊
Probably 'cause it's the only type of beer I've never got bored of and a low abv bitter is good for long sessions.
Bitter on cask to be precise. ❤️
 
English bitter 😊
Probably 'cause it's the only type of beer I've never got bored of and a low abv bitter is good for long sessions.
Bitter on cask to be precise. ❤️
Sorry for the hijack OP, but Ingo, are you on a pin or firkin, or are you using a corney? If the former, are you on horizontal or vertical stilllage, with a widge? Thinking of different configurations - on a corney but would like to setup for horizontal stillage. Cooling is the issue.
 
English Dark Mild
American Brown Ale close second
Been brewing about 13 years

Have heard a common hearsay that many brewers prefer lagers despite being obliged to brew IPAs. I've not seen that be true amongst homebrewers so much though
 
Those of you that have been brewing for over 5 years and have tried to brew many or even most types of beer, what has become your favorite drinking beer?

Please do not reply here if you have less than 5 years experience.

I have a theory that many of us come to the same conclusion. I'm not going to say what I think until I've seen some results.

There's a type of beer that's the reason I started brewing and I've seen many seasoned brewers talk about that type as their favorite.
I wanna see how common that is 😊

I just absolutely love that type and wish it had all the nutrition a human body needs 'cause I'd be up for drinking that all day every day 😊
Saison. Hands down.

I love every style for some reason, but there is something about a good Saison. Doesn't have to be the same recipe or strength, they always seem delicious!
 
Sorry for the hijack OP, but Ingo, are you on a pin or firkin, or are you using a corney? If the former, are you on horizontal or vertical stilllage, with a widge? Thinking of different configurations - on a corney but would like to setup for horizontal stillage. Cooling is the issue.
Sorry I'm so new to this that I don't understand half of what you're asking hahaha 😊
Don't know when I'll have the knowledge to be able to answer that 😬😊

Only have 4 brews under my belt and the first two were kit beers. And I'm bottling everything.
 
7 of you so far have mentioned english bitters. That's what I was looking for 😊

If I had to choose one, that would be it. But Irish stouts, German dunkel and good europian lagers are also something I very much apreciate.
And last night I had a taste of the best fruity, hoppy ipa I've tested. Never been the biggest fan of that but that one might have changed that a bit.
 
Sorry I'm so new to this that I don't understand half of what you're asking hahaha 😊
Don't know when I'll have the knowledge to be able to answer that 😬😊

Only have 4 brews under my belt and the first two were kit beers. And I'm bottling everything.
Oh, sorry, lol. You mentioned you prefer to brew ales on cask, so I was wondering whether you use a standard cask, or corney.
 
7 of you so far have mentioned english bitters. That's what I was looking for
And 8 mentioned some kind of lager, including at least two of the people who mentioned bitters. If there's a trend here it's that different people like different things and most people like more than one.
 
I bet for many there is a difference between their favorite beer and what they keep on tap most often.

There’s processes involved that influence what we chose to regularly brew that go beyond choosing favorites all of the time.

Like for me, having only one fermentation chamber for lagering, I need to plan ahead before committing to a 4-8 week lagered beer. I don’t do rush lagers. So recently I brewed 3 batches specifically to stock up, including an open ferment, free rise saison, before putting down a dopplebock this weekend.

Had I no other considerations, I’d be brewing lagers almost exclusively.
 
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