Favorite English Yeast Strain - Poll

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Favorite English Yeast Straing

  • WY1028 London Ale (WLP013)

  • WY1084 Irish Ale (WLP004)

  • WY1098 British Ale (WLP007)

  • WY1099 Whitbread (n/a)

  • WY1275 Thames Valley (WLP023)

  • 1318 London Ale II (n/a)

  • 1335 British Ale II (WLP025)

  • 1338 European Ale (WLP011)

  • 1728 Scottish Ale (WLP028)

  • 1968 London ESB Ale (WLP002)


Results are only viewable after voting.

blizzard

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I’m thinking of picking a new strain as my standard English yeast to have around. I haven’t been too happy with the flavor profile of S-04 - it’s a little too fruity at low temps and attenuates a little too much for me. I’m leaning towards 1968, since it is reportedly used at Deschutes and I love their beers.

What’s your favorite and why?
 

iparks81

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I don't know how Wyeast whitbread (1099?) compares to S-04 but I have been using that quite a bit and I love it. Especially in IPA's
A
 

Golddiggie

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I like several of the Wyeast strains listed... 1728 since it has a wide thermal range, ferments clean, but lets the malt come through. Plus it goes up to ~12% ABV... 1335 worked great in a cream ale I made, and I've used it in a couple of other brews since then. I used 1084 in a couple of brews, also with solid results. 1318 helped make my old ale great...

I've used 1728 and 1335 the most, so far. I am planning on using 1318 again in my next brew, since it has characteristics I want in that batch. I'll make sure to harvest/wash that yeast for use later too.

Personally, I try to use only a few different yeast strains for pretty much anything I make. That way I can simply harvest, wash, and store the yeast for future batches. Since I'm using liquid strains, doing that helps balance out the cost...
 

beowulf

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1968 is the only one I've tried so far, and I really liked it. Worked great on a number of porters and stouts and a brown ale. I think I'll be trying 1028 on my next set of beers.
 

motobrewer

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1318 is london ale 3

and out of the british yeasts i've used, it's my favorite. but i haven't used that many.
 

WolvinMaine

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WY1318, London Ale III was pretty nice when I tried it. Drops clear quickly, and it just lives on the top. I think this is a winner if you want a very easy top cropping yeast. The flavor is excellent as well, if you like fruity and maltier beers.
 

avidhomebrewer

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I've used all of them in the past and like 1028, 1318, 1338, and 1728 the best. Of those, I probably like 1728 the most; can make a big beer with that strain and it leaves a malty profile.
 
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blizzard

blizzard

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My answer would depend on the OG of the beer and your mash temps. I had a really bad experience with 1728 for the same reasons avid has had good experiences.

Fair enough, but I'm looking for an all around english yeast. I make a pretty wide variety of styles, so rather than have several english strains I'd like to go with one that has some versatility.

Off topic - can you PM me that Trois Pistoles recipe you used?
 

Golddiggie

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My answer would depend on the OG of the beer and your mash temps. I had a really bad experience with 1728 for the same reasons avid has had good experiences.

IMO, you need to match the desired result with the correct yeast strain to get you that result. Plus, mash at the correct temp range to get the body amount you desire. I mashed an old ale at 154F, using WY1318 in it, and it came out great. My wee heavy (made with WY1728, mashed at 154F) isn't ready for sampling yet, so we'll have to wait to see how that came out. I did mash a batch at 158F using WY1084 and it still came out solid. Enough malt backbone to it so that you have a hint, but also great mouth feel to it. Everything else I've mashed has been in the 150-154F range, with solid results.

Keep in mind, most of the time, if you're looking to brew styles from the British Isles, you can get away with 3-4 yeast strains to cover ~90% (or better) of the brews... IMO, that's pretty damned good. Especially if you're washing/saving yeast from batches.
 

bierhaus15

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You're missing the most quintessentially 'British' yeast available: 1187 Ringwood. Not my all time favorite, but among the more traditional ones.

1318, 1968, 1187 are among my favorites - and the more characterful yeasts.
 

StMarcos

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There's several I haven't tried. Did a side by side split batch with 1098 and 1099, with 1098 being the clear winner. Maltier and fruitier. The 1099 also made more acetaldehyde. 100x10^9 cells per 6G of 1.05 wort, lots of O2. On yeast for 3 weeks, then kegged.

I've mostly use 1968, and it works great, just got a bit bored with it.
 

GuldTuborg

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I certainly haven't tried them all, but I've used the majority of them at least once. I tend to prefer 1318 and 1728. 1318 is great for a pretty wide variety of beers, tends to be forgiving in terms of temperature, and just tastes good. 1728 I like for maltier beers, or for winter brewing when it's damned cold out. I haven't brewed any really big beers with this yeast yet, but I'm definitely wanting to try it. For some reason, I love this yeast with stouts and (especially) porters.
 

permo

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WLP007 Dry English ale is pretty much my go to yeast now.

Chromados

Simply awesome yeast. Drops out like a rock, balances flavors between malt and hops and always attenuates. White labs says 65-70, but I have fermented at 62 with no problems for a super clean beer.
 

Gremlyn

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I would go with WLP023 followed closely by WLP037. I love 023 for the estery profile, it makes some some really interesting darker English style beer. WLP037 is the Sam Smith strain, and a Platinum White Labs strain that's only available towards the end of the year. It's very malt forward, and not super estery so it makes for some great beer :) I'm about to do a porter with 037 :)
 

joety

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IMO, you need to match the desired result with the correct yeast strain to get you that result. Plus, mash at the correct temp range to get the body amount you desire. I mashed an old ale at 154F, using WY1318 in it, and it came out great. My wee heavy (made with WY1728, mashed at 154F) isn't ready for sampling yet, so we'll have to wait to see how that came out. I did mash a batch at 158F using WY1084 and it still came out solid. Enough malt backbone to it so that you have a hint, but also great mouth feel to it. Everything else I've mashed has been in the 150-154F range, with solid results.

Keep in mind, most of the time, if you're looking to brew styles from the British Isles, you can get away with 3-4 yeast strains to cover ~90% (or better) of the brews... IMO, that's pretty damned good. Especially if you're washing/saving yeast from batches.

Absolutely, that was what I was trying to get at. There is a difference between "what is your favorite english strain" vs. "what strain would you want if stranded on a desert island and you can only have one".
 

jaba

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I am a huge fan of Wyeast 1882-PC Thames Valley II Yeast. Its a private collection seasonal yeast. It is extremely flocculant and produces some great beers. I made an ESB with it last summer that was one of my best beers.


Beer Styles: Ordinary and Special Bitters, ESB, Northern English Brown, Robust Porter, Dry Stout, Foreign Extra Stout
Profile: This strain was originally sourced from a now defunct brewery on the banks of the river Thames outside of Oxford, England. Thames Valley II produces crisp, dry beers with a rich malt profile and moderate stone fruit esters. This attenuative strain is also highly flocculent resulting in bright beers not requiring filtration. A thorough diacetyl rest is recommended after fermentation is complete.

Alc. Tolerance 10% ABV
Flocculation High
Attenuation 72-78%
Temp. Range 60-70°F (15-21°C)
 

cyclonite

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I used to use S-04, but it seemed to add some tart/sourness to the finished product that I do not care for (at least for the ones I used it in - a porter and an ESB/pale ale).
 

hadabar

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1469 , yorkshire square....the best yeast to date.

my work horse is wlp 007...

please can we get 1469 year round?!

I just made a brown ale with wlp 037...conditioning now...looks promising
 
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blizzard

blizzard

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bierhaus15 said:
You're missing the most quintessentially 'British' yeast available: 1187 Ringwood. Not my all time favorite, but among the more traditional ones.

1318, 1968, 1187 are among my favorites - and the more characterful yeasts.

I'm not missing it, I'm actually afraid of it based on reviews I've already read. Since I'm limited to 10 on the poll, I left it off.

jbrookeiv said:
No S-04 love?

I don't personally care for it; that's why I'm looking for something new.

Franc103 said:
I also like S-04.

Abstaining from poll.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe S-04 is the whitbread strain, so you can cast your vote there if you wish to participate.

Thanks for all the replies. For those that love 007 - do you find it is too clean and high flocculating, making it similar to WY1056/WLP001?
 

hadabar

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blizzard said:
Thanks for all the replies. For those that love 007 - do you find it is too clean and high flocculating, making it similar to WY1056/WLP001?

its clean, if fermented clean. if you push it a little warmer it shows its english.

that said...if I'm making an english beer it is not my go to yeast.
 

statseeker

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I've tried 1024 with a stout and liked the results for the most part. Fermented pretty dry. That said though, I really like S-04 for IPAs because of the esters it does provide round out the hopping style I prefer. So I guess you could say I like 1099 too....-shrug-? I am thinking about trying the Ringwood strain with a pale ale recipe I'm putting together at the moment.
 

Ace_Club

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No Notty or Windsor dry ale yeasts?

Also abstaining from poll.

Notty is my current workhorse. I like that it works well in all types of beers. It can ferment clean or fruity, and, being dry, is cheap and easy to have around.

That being said, I really like Windsor and the character it gives to the finished beer. It is my favorite of the two, but I don't use it as much since it takes so gosh-darn long to clear.
 

Ichthy

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023. Tastes great, drops super clear. Always use a blow-off tube, it happens every time to me.
 

iasquith

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Out of the two that i've tried I prefer 1728 because of its malty finish and the fact that it doesn't attenuate down too dry Ive made IPA's stouts , scottish and bitters with this yeast, robust and reliable
1099 on the other hand stays two sweet I cant make it come down lower than 1018 , though i like the nice toffee tones it has.
both yeasts I'm still using a year on (washing) in fact there the only yeast i have .thinking of going next with 1098 and a yorkshire square uuuummmmm..
 

trigger

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Uh, I prefer the Wy 1469, but it's a seasonal yeast. If you're into true british flavors I don't think you can find anything better. If you wash yeast you can keep it year round.
 
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