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chemist308

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I've noticed most recipes I've used take light LME extract. But as discussed at length in previous threads, light LME will create a beer with a light taste but a dark color. Light LME itself does not appear all that light to me. For stout it doesn't matter, but for pales folks have a little trouble understanding that my dark beer will have the taste of a pale.

So I was wondering, what about using Muntons extra light LME or Northern Brewers Pilsen LME? Will those create a beer with a much lighter appearance without compromising flavor and ABV content?
 

chillHayze

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Yes.
Also try a larger boil and late extract addition. Add one lb at 60 min as usual, then save the rest to add at 15 min.
You can use DME (powder extract) as it tends not to scorch as much, makes a lighter beer, and just taste less extract-ey.
 
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chemist308

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Great. Should I use more of the extra light or pilsen LME to ensure consistent flavor?

If so, say I would normally use 6.6# of light LME for a pale ale. How much of the extra light LME would I be using for the same flavor with a lighter color?

Thanks again.
 

Chello

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you should use the same amount of light and extra light extract.
 

chillHayze

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The flavor really is very similar extra light to dark in extracts. Main changes are from brand to brand. Some brands have different fermentability characteristics, which is the main perception of body in beer. Look for the most fermentability for a lighter body.
 

NitrouStang96

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My LHBS told me that they don't carry extra light DME because there's really no difference between light and extra light. My bottled but not yet sampled attempt at Biermuncher's Centennial Blonde with plain light DME is EXTREMELY clear and light even before filling the bottles - my attempt at Edwort's Haus Pale Ale is almost as clear and light with light DME (it had more steeped grains to account for the slightly darker and thicker color).

I added 25% of my DME for the full 60min boil and the remaining 75% with 15min left. This will be your best bet, and you will be pleased. It will look darker in your fermenter, but it will look like bud light in the bottle.
 

skou

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NitrouStang96 said:
My LHBS told me that they don't carry extra light DME because there's really no difference between light and extra light.
You just may want to shop for a real LHBS, if this is the case. There is a REAL difference. Find a LHBS who believes this, or try mail-order.

(I should know, I bagged down MANY 50 or 55 pound bags of light and XL DME.)( I used to work at the LHBS.)

Oh, the late addition is a great way to keep your beer light colored.

steve
 

Warrior

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chemist308 said:
I've noticed most recipes I've used take light LME extract. But as discussed at length in previous threads, light LME will create a beer with a light taste but a dark color. Light LME itself does not appear all that light to me. For stout it doesn't matter, but for pales folks have a little trouble understanding that my dark beer will have the taste of a pale.

So I was wondering, what about using Muntons extra light LME or Northern Brewers Pilsen LME? Will those create a beer with a much lighter appearance without compromising flavor and ABV content?
I would switch to the ex light DME. It is much cheaper in bulk by the 50 lb bag. Check with your LHBS and see if he can order you the Breiss ex light DME. This is a very fermentable DME and produces very light beers. To get more dextrins you could do a small partial mash to give you more body and unfermentable sugars in your beers.
 

Revvy

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How can a full boil be done, but still have a late edition extract?
You add an amount anywhere from 1 pound to half your extract in the initial boil....following the recipe for the hop additions, then at around the 15-20 minute remaining mark, you add the remainder of the extract.

The early extract is to help your hop isomeration.....but if your recipe called for any steeping grains, you can even skip the early extract addition and go for the total late, especially if, as some recipes call for there is a bit of two-row (Like kits from Austin Homebrew).

When I am formulating any extract with grain recipes I ALWAYS base it around Extralight DME, then I get all my flavor and color complexity from my steeping (or partial mashing) grains. That way you get to use more and varied grains.

For example, let's say you are making an amber ale....If you based it around amber extract, you have very little room to get complexity from roasted or crystalized grains.....you run the risk of muddying the flavor and ending up too dark for your recipe.....

Staying with my Amber example...The Srm range for that style is SRM: 10 – 17 so if your base extract already puts you into 14 srms, you son't have much room to move around it....you may be able to sneak in a pound of crystal 30 let's say in it.

But if your Extralight DME has a color of 5 SRMs, you can really get into the recipe and play around with different combinations of grains until you get into the right color and Og range for the style.

It's kind of like making model airplanes....remember the "snap together" types that you started out with? You had maybe 8 pieces; 2 body halves two front wings, 2 rear wings and maybe 2 pieces for a cockpit, or two pieces for landing gear...

But if you got one of those 500 piece b52 bomber kits....you had a much more complex final product.
 

neldred

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Thank you Revvy

Another question then, trying to figure out water amount (let's base it on a 5 gallon since that's the most common)...

Steeping is done either in water, or in a "light wort". Let's say for a minute the water method is easiest.

So if I want to do a 1. Full Boil with extra light/pilsen DME how much water do I add there for the 'full boil' (with late addition DME), and how much water should be used for steeping.

Both the boil of the wort, and the steeping will produce evaporation, so do you guys just add water at the very end to make up for whatever is under 5 gallons?

And also, with late addition extract added, aren't the IBU's from the hops going to be far less than with a full or mostly full boil? Do you just double the hops, but then you would need to know ahead of time how much water is going to be added. Sorry for all the questions, I'm still on the newby 2 gallon kit (6th batch) and am definitely ready for the next step.
 
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