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rsitzejr

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I've just used the packaged yeast, different types, where I cool down some wort, mix the yeast and let it sit for how ever long the directions tell me. I've used liquid once, where you smash the package and let it sit, then pitch it. But I'm reading about starter yeasts here and am getting confused.
 

vtfan99

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A yeast starter is simply a mixture (in our case a small amount of wort) that provides the yeast some nutrients so that it can reproduce and make more yeast. Making a starter allows you to pitch more yeast into your wort which can reduce lag time and create a more active fermentation. The debate on whether to use one is ongoing. Google the rec.crafts.brewing newsgroup and you'll find endless posts on the subject.
 

DeRoux's Broux

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starters are a breeze. i just use a vial of pitchable yeast and add it to a "mini" wort the day before i brew. I use a
2000 ml Pyrex flask for my starters. I heat 1300 ml water, add 1 cup light, dried malt extract, and disolve, bring to a gentle boil, and boil for 15 minutes. after 15 minutes, i pour the wort into the cleaned and sanitized flask, cover tightly w/ foil, and set the flask in an ice bath in the sink. after it cools to touch, i shake the flask real good to aerate the wort, open the vial of White Labs yeast, and poor it in the flask, cover with a cleaned and sanitized air lock/stopper, and let 'er go to work. i usually see activity in 2-4 hours. i keep it at room temp on the kitchen counter until i need it to pitch in the main wort the next day. when you start making the starter, remove the vial of yeast from the fridge, so it can come to room temp before pitching. you always want to have the starter at the same temp (or close) to the desired pitching temp of the main wort you will add it too. some people decant the liquide off the top of the slury in the starter and just pitch the slurry to the mian wort, and some add all (i do). i just swirle the starter flask real good to mix up the slury and wort, and pour it into my primary. i see activity in my primary in 4-6 hours. you'll get a good strong ferment from it, with better flavored and protected beer! check out www.WhiteLabs.com web page, they have a decent FAQ page with yeast starter info.

hope this helps?

cheers!
DeRoux's Broux
 
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rsitzejr

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Sounds like it's what I do, except your doing it the day before. Makes sense. I'll try that with my next porter. Thanks.
 

danflatten

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DeRoux's Broux said:
starters are a breeze. i just use a vial of pitchable yeast and add it to a "mini" wort the day before i brew. I use a
2000 ml Pyrex flask for my starters. I heat 1300 ml water, add 1 cup light, dried malt extract, and disolve, bring to a gentle boil, and boil for 15 minutes. after 15 minutes, i pour the wort into the cleaned and sanitized flask, cover tightly w/ foil, and set the flask in an ice bath in the sink. after it cools to touch, i shake the flask real good to aerate the wort, open the vial of White Labs yeast, and poor it in the flask, cover with a cleaned and sanitized air lock/stopper, and let 'er go to work. i usually see activity in 2-4 hours. i keep it at room temp on the kitchen counter until i need it to pitch in the main wort the next day. when you start making the starter, remove the vial of yeast from the fridge, so it can come to room temp before pitching. you always want to have the starter at the same temp (or close) to the desired pitching temp of the main wort you will add it too. some people decant the liquide off the top of the slury in the starter and just pitch the slurry to the mian wort, and some add all (i do). i just swirle the starter flask real good to mix up the slury and wort, and pour it into my primary. i see activity in my primary in 4-6 hours. you'll get a good strong ferment from it, with better flavored and protected beer! check out www.WhiteLabs.com web page, they have a decent FAQ page with yeast starter info.

hope this helps?

cheers!
DeRoux's Broux
Niether the liquid yeast vial nor my supply store says anything about liquid yeast needing a starter. I just introduce it to the cooled wort directly from the vial. This works, but does it need a starter?
 
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danflatten said:
Niether the liquid yeast vial nor my supply store says anything about liquid yeast needing a starter. I just introduce it to the cooled wort directly from the vial. This works, but does it need a starter?
No, it doesn't "need" a starter but you can get your fermentation going faster with a heavier pitch of active yeast. Just sitting in the vial they're kind of dormant and will take a while longer to kick off than when using a starter that has started to multiply...

FYI - I forget more times than I remember to do a starter. I think that's because I usually brew on Saturdays and it's Thirsty Thursday at a local brew pub where it's $2 pints all night... ;)
 

DeRoux's Broux

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danflatten said:
Niether the liquid yeast vial nor my supply store says anything about liquid yeast needing a starter. I just introduce it to the cooled wort directly from the vial. This works, but does it need a starter?
you don't have to do a starter if your using a good liquide yeast. the only time you "have to" or "should" is when your making a high gravity brew, lager (recommended, not required again), or the vial/packet is past it's "use by date".

desert brew is right, though. it just helps shorten lag times, add's sufficient # of yeast cells per ml of wort, and makes a better brew! :D
 

BBQBrew

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I have only brewed 3 batches of beer. I did my first batch with dry yeast...took about 36 hours for fermentation to begin. My last two batches (hefe & lite ale) I used a starter...WOW what a difference it makes. Both times fermentation started with 5 hours of pitching. I like the idea of my beer getting started sooner...helps insure the yeast you pitch gets control before any other nasties get a chance....anyway...making starters is fun and easy!! ;)
 

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Well in addition to reducing lag time in your primary a starter also lets you know that you are pitching a GOOD HEALTHY yeast.

There's nothing worse that brewing, pitching yeast and waiting 3 (WASTED) days to find out your yeast was DEAD!

You end up wasting time and money then pitching another yeast...did I hear "starter" next time?

A starter is just a small batch of beer. Once it has a kreusen head on it you KNOW it's good!

Incidently, "kreusen" verses "krausen"...the German pronuncuiation ("eu" is "oy" and "au" is "ou") for both words are "croy (as in "boy")- sen" and "crou (as in "ouch")-sen". . Kreusen is the correct term.
 
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rsitzejr

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Ok, I usually don't have a wort done until I"m brewing, and by then it's too late. I can make a mini wort, but wouldn't making that depend on what kind of beer I'm brewing? I don't want to make a IPA wort to start when I'm doing a porter. Extract so how do I make the a smaller batch of wort prior to brewing?
 

BBQBrew

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I was taught to use 1/2 to 1 cup of Light DME and a "pinch" of yeast nutrient mix for all my starters.
 
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rsitzejr

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And that does not affect the flavor if, say, your brewing a darker beer?
 

DeRoux's Broux

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rsitzejr said:
And that does not affect the flavor if, say, your brewing a darker beer?
whatcha mean rsitzejr? the amunt of yeast, type of DME, or yeast nutrient? :confused:
 
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rsitzejr

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Type of DME, I would assume you would use the same type yeast in the starter that you use in whatever your brewing. I usually use a liquid malt extract when I brew, what kinds depends on what type of beer. I've never used a DME.
 

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rsitzejr said:
I don't want to make a IPA wort to start when I'm doing a porter. Extract so how do I make the a smaller batch of wort prior to brewing?
Of course you don't. You have to know what kind of beer you intend on making first.

If you know what you're making then you would use the exact or similar malt that you will be using for your batch and the required type of yeast. This is one reason why you should always have some extra light DME around.

You can use it for any type of beer you'll make. Of course you shouldn't use chocolate malt for a starter if you're making a pilsner.

A smaller batch (starter) would be 1 c water and 1/2 c malt boiled for 5 mins. Transfer it to a container (I use a sanitized clear flippie bottle) for cooling. When it cools down you add the yeast of the type of brew you'll be making, add an airlock and wait until tomorrow. When you get activity you know your yeast is alive.

You do this the day before to make sure you get activity.
Sterilize the bottle opening with some vodka and set it aflame. Then it's sterilized so you can pour the mini-wort/yeast mixture into the primary with your freshly brewed (cooled) wort.
 

homebrewer_99

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NO, that was not the answer you were looking for...at least, I don't think so.

I don't want you taking my answer the wrong way.

True, you can use any type of malt you want AS LONG AS it is the same type you will be using for the batch you will be making.

True, the lighter the malt the MORE you can use it for ANY type of beer you plan on brewing.

That's why I recommended the extra light DME. Every brew you make is going to be darker than extra light DME.

Other sugars you can use are corn sugar, honey, and rice. I am certain you can make a fine starter with any of these also, but many/most of us don't have those laying around or use them in our brews.

Here's the clincher that I'm not certain you grasp yet (and I could be totally wrong in thinking you don't get it so if I am let me know)...you have to use the YEAST for the style you are brewing.

If you combine the Extra Light DME and your yeast you'll be fine.

Actually, I read an article that recommended "canning" pre-measured malts (1 C water to 1/2 C malt) in pint-sized Mason jars. Once they're "cooked" they're sterile. Just sanitize your starter bottle, mix the yeast and malt in it and add an airlock. Done. No waiting around for the mini-wort to cool down before adding the yeast the day before Brew Day. The malt cools down to room temp and sits on the shelf until you need it . . . all sanitized, sterilized and airtight. :D

Open, pitch, pour, mix, airlock, wait. I have plans (and supplies) to can this week or next since I'll be overseas for a couple of weeks they'll have plenty of time to cool down.

I hope I cleared it up for you. Sorry for being winded, but I wanted to make certain you knew what I meant. :D

Good luck.
 
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