Experiment results - Olive Oil Aeration

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day_trippr

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O'Henry had nothing on you folks :)

Did you ever do a test between properly aerated vs no aeration?

Cheers!
 

RM-MN

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Thank you for doing this test. If I read the Grady Hull report correctly it would need a vehicle to keep the olive oil dissolved in the wort which most of us wouldn't have done.

I'd really like to see the results of no aeration/aeration/pure oxygen on a beer with about 1.050 OG. I really suspect that a lot of brewing "knowledge" is just an idea handed down and repeated until everyone treats it as gospel.

Because I live a long way from a supply of liquid yeast and never plan my brewday until the night before if even that, I tend to use dry yeast most of the time. With that, most of my beers are 1.050 to 1.070 and I sometimes aerate and sometime not but to further complicate any "results" I rarely use the same recipe twice but I can't tell any noticeable difference if I aerate or not. It would be nice to see an experiment on that aspect.
 

JohnSand

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I only aerate by aggressive pour. It works well. But I have a theory about yeast: it can tolerate a certain amount of abuse. Pitch rates are estimates with a built in safety factor. So if your yeast is a bit old, okay. Pitch a little warm or cool, okay. Not quite enough oxygen, okay. A small under-pitch, okay. Any two of those? Risking trouble.
 

pdxal

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Thank you for doing this test. If I read the Grady Hull report correctly it would need a vehicle to keep the olive oil dissolved in the wort which most of us wouldn't have done.

I'd really like to see the results of no aeration/aeration/pure oxygen on a beer with about 1.050 OG. I really suspect that a lot of brewing "knowledge" is just an idea handed down and repeated until everyone treats it as gospel.

Because I live a long way from a supply of liquid yeast and never plan my brewday until the night before if even that, I tend to use dry yeast most of the time. With that, most of my beers are 1.050 to 1.070 and I sometimes aerate and sometime not but to further complicate any "results" I rarely use the same recipe twice but I can't tell any noticeable difference if I aerate or not. It would be nice to see an experiment on that aspect.
IIRC dry yeast doesn't have the same requirements for oxygenation, perhaps an apples to oranges comparison. If it works for you, keep doing it. I frequently don't oxygenate too, particularly with dry yeasts, and end up with good beers. Would be interesting to see a comparison, though.:mug:
 
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Denny

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Thank you for doing this test. If I read the Grady Hull report correctly it would need a vehicle to keep the olive oil dissolved in the wort which most of us wouldn't have done.

I'd really like to see the results of no aeration/aeration/pure oxygen on a beer with about 1.050 OG. I really suspect that a lot of brewing "knowledge" is just an idea handed down and repeated until everyone treats it as gospel.

Because I live a long way from a supply of liquid yeast and never plan my brewday until the night before if even that, I tend to use dry yeast most of the time. With that, most of my beers are 1.050 to 1.070 and I sometimes aerate and sometime not but to further complicate any "results" I rarely use the same recipe twice but I can't tell any noticeable difference if I aerate or not. It would be nice to see an experiment on that aspect.
The purpose of aeration is to facilitate cell growth. Because there are so many cells in a pack of dry yeast, cell growth isn't necessary and neither is aeration. That's probably why you can't tell the difference.
 
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