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Howitzer

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Hi Master Brewers.
I brewed a 15L batch (4 gallon) approx, on 07th August at 02:00 PM late night it started fermenting and CO2 molecules seen in the wort.

On 9th the solution bubbled like superfast 4/5 bubbles per second also it was visible tiny bubbles inside the solution. High krausen formed during this.

Suddenly, on 9th late night it all stopped no airlock bubble (leveled up) no krausen and no tiny CO2 bubbles everything stopped.

Any reason? I'm new and this is my first batch.

OG 1.062
 

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Simple answer. It finished. After high Krausen you’ll see a dramatic drop off in activity. The exponential growth of yeast also means exponential conversion of sugar to alcohol and co2. It simply just finished ‘eating’ all the sugar. Nothing to worry about.

Try raising the temperature a couple of degrees. You will probably will see a few more bubbles. But nothing special. The temperature kind give the yeast a second wind and cleans up after itself (licked the plate). This is a good thing. But do not raise it it too much. About 68-70F is good. Raise it a little at a time until you are there. 1-2F degrees every 12-24 hours.
 
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Howitzer

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Simple answer. It finished. After high Krausen you’ll see a dramatic drop off in activity. The exponential growth of yeast also means the exponential conversion of sugar to alcohol and co2. It simply just finished ‘eating’ all the sugar. Nothing to worry about.

Try raising the temperature a couple of degrees. You will probably see a few more bubbles. But nothing special. The temperature kind gives the yeast a second wind and cleans up after itself (licked the plate). This is a good thing. But do not raise it too much. About 68-70F is good. Raise it a little at a time until you are there. 1-2F degrees every 12-24 hours.

Simple answer. It finished. After high Krausen you’ll see a dramatic drop off in activity. The exponential growth of yeast also means the exponential conversion of sugar to alcohol and co2. It simply just finished ‘eating’ all the sugar. Nothing to worry about.

Try raising the temperature a couple of degrees. You will probably see a few more bubbles. But nothing special. The temperature kind gives the yeast a second wind and cleans up after itself (licked the plate). This is a good thing. But do not raise it too much. About 68-70F is good. Raise it a little at a time until you are there. 1-2F degrees every 12-24 hours.
Thank you for your quick response, I was out for some work and during the initial rapid phase, the temperature rose to 3/4 degrees more than 26 degrees( max limit for Safale S-04 yeast). As I reached home I adjusted the temperature. And again tint bubbles and bit krausen started forming. Is this okay?
 

hotbeer

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Sounds as if all went as normal and expected to me. I will never base it being finished on bubbles though. Especially airlock bubbles. They are purely for your entertainment and mean nothing reliable, IMO.

I've had many batched go from a very active kraeusen to nothing a few hours later.

If you can't check the SG, then just let it stay in the FV till it cleans up and doesn't look so murky. Probably another week, maybe sooner maybe later.
 
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Howitzer

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Sounds as if all went as normal and expected to me. I will never base it being finished on bubbles though. Especially airlock bubbles. They are purely for your entertainment and mean nothing reliable, IMO.

I've had many batched go from a very active kraeusen to nothing a few hours later.

If you can't check the SG, then just let it stay in the FV till it cleans up and doesn't look so murky. Probably another week, maybe sooner maybe later.
Thanks for the reply.
Yeast is still working as I can see tiny bubbles under wort. Bit white foam floating above wort (looks exactly as when fermentation started).

The beer looks Golden yellow.
I'll let it sit for another 10 days. Is it okay?🍺
 

hotbeer

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I'll let it sit for another 10 days. Is it okay?
Is it okay? Well you haven't said anything that might suggest it's not okay.

If you don't have a hydrometer to get SG, then I'd let it sit for at least 2 full weeks since put in the FV. So yeah, if 10 days more is two full weeks then sure.

I'm generally never in a hurry to get beer out of the fermenter. I'll let it stay in there until all the yeast and other stuff in it drops out and it's almost as clear and clean as I'd like it to be when I drink it. Sometimes I've gone 6 weeks in the primary fermenter.

You can hurry that along, but that's stuff I've no desire to do. So others can give you that.

I have had some beers that were getting real clear and clean just about to the point where I wanted to bottle them and then they'd start bubbling vigorously again and become cloudy again. Don't know what that was about. Maybe a stall while the yeast was getting ready to chew on a more complex sugar or something. Don't think it was infection as those were some great tasting beers.
 

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Is it okay? Well you haven't said anything that might suggest it's not okay.

If you don't have a hydrometer to get SG, then I'd let it sit for at least 2 full weeks since put in the FV. So yeah, if 10 days more is two full weeks then sure.

I'm generally never in a hurry to get beer out of the fermenter. I'll let it stay in there until all the yeast and other stuff in it drops out and it's almost as clear and clean as I'd like it to be when I drink it. Sometimes I've gone 6 weeks in the primary fermenter.

You can hurry that along, but that's stuff I've no desire to do. So others can give you that.

I have had some beers that were getting real clear and clean just about to the point where I wanted to bottle them and then they'd start bubbling vigorously again and become cloudy again. Don't know what that was about. Maybe a stall while the yeast was getting ready to chew on a more complex sugar or something. Don't think it was infection as those were some great tasting beers.
That just happened to me last weekend. Brought my carboy up to bottle it and the motion started another active round of fermentation. Put it back and will bottle it tomorrow night instead.
 
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Howitzer

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Is it okay? Well you haven't said anything that might suggest it's not okay.

If you don't have a hydrometer to get SG, then I'd let it sit for at least 2 full weeks since put in the FV. So yeah, if 10 days more is two full weeks then sure.

I'm generally never in a hurry to get beer out of the fermenter. I'll let it stay in there until all the yeast and other stuff in it drops out and it's almost as clear and clean as I'd like it to be when I drink it. Sometimes I've gone 6 weeks in the primary fermenter.

You can hurry that along, but that's stuff I've no desire to do. So others can give you that.

I have had some beers that were getting real clear and clean just about to the point where I wanted to bottle them and then they'd start bubbling vigorously again and become cloudy again. Don't know what that was about. Maybe a stall while the yeast was getting ready to chew on a more complex sugar or something. Don't think it was infection as those were some great tasting beers.
🙂 I'll let it sit untill no active actions found. (As you said more than 10/15/20 days).

An update: A new krausen white (foam) covered all the top and is growing quickly. This foam was minimal yesterday but today it covered all the top area. Is it second round of fermentation?

Thanks mate 😃
 

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Is it second round of fermentation?
If anything to call it, then just say it's fermentation. If your beer wasn't finished fermenting the first time, then this is just a continuation of the first process.

Visual clues are just that, clues. They don't really determine whether your beer is fermenting. There can be a fermenting going on and very little visual clues.

I wouldn't call it a second round if it's just finishing up what was suppose to be fermented originally.

A decreasing SG is the more accepted way to tell if fermentation is taking place.
 

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I bottle my beer, and I'm very cautious about fermentation being finished before bottling. If it's not finished, it will finish in the bottles and you will might have bottle bombs. Two gravity samples three days apart will generally tell you if it is finished - if gravity drops between readings, it's not ready. Since you don't have a hydrometer, I would wait three weeks before bottling. I've even had a few problem fermentations that took over a month. If you plan to bottle your beer, I would recommend getting a narrow range bottlng hydrometer. Mine has hash marks every 0.0005 SG units, and I can detect a very small change in gravity.
Edit: Changed "will" to "might"
 
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If it's not finished, it will finish in the bottles and you will might have bottle bombs.
fixed it for you. IMO, when ferments stall, they are usually not much further to go. So not that much more CO2 to make actual bombs IMO. Just very highly carbonated beer.
 
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I bottle my beer, and I'm very cautious about fermentation being finished before bottling. If it's not finished, it will finish in the bottles and you will have bottle bombs. Two gravity samples three days apart will generally tell you if it is finished - if gravity drops between readings, it's not ready. Since you don't have a hydrometer, I would wait three weeks before bottling. I've even had a few problem fermentations that took over a month. If you plan to bottle your beer, I would recommend getting a narrow range bottlng hydrometer. Mine has hash marks every 0.0005 SG units, and I can detect a very small change in gravity.
I have a hydrometer!😁 But I'm scared of oxygenating the beer by opening it.
 

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What yeast did you use?
If it's a diastaticus (like a lot of Belgiums and Saison) then wait 4 weeks as they keep fermenting for a long time.
Generally, wait till you think it is finished, then take a sample, then 2-3 days later again. Since you are using a carboy, you wont have a spigot to easily take a sample though.
Don't know how other people take samples in that case (me, I just chance it, but that's not good advice)
 
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What yeast did you use?
If it's a diastaticus (like a lot of Belgiums and Saison) then wait 4 weeks as they keep fermenting for a long time.
Generally, wait till you think it is finished, then take a sample, then 2-3 days later again. Since you are using a carboy, you won't have a spigot to easily take a sample though.
Don't know how other people take samples in that case (me, I just change it, but that's not good advice)
Thank you for answering.
I used Safale S-04
Grains - Barley & wheat 3:2 ratio.

After that rapid bubbling event when everything stopped. Right the next day I'm seeing white Foam just like the beginning of Fermentation. Tiny CO2 bubbles are still going up inside the fermenter.
The Foam is less but it covered the whole top of the fermenter. I'm planning to let it sit for another 1/2 weeks until there's some sign of completion.
But the question is how to know it's done, I'm afraid to open the carboy for gravity reading too soon, there's a subtle change of oxygenating it.
Are there any visual signs to know the fermentation is done?
 

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But the question is how to know it's done, I'm afraid to open the carboy for gravity reading too soon, there's a subtle change of oxygenating it.
Unless you are making a NEIPA a little oxidation isn't going to ruin the beer. The only way to be sure the beer is done is to take a sample. Try to limit how long you have the carboy open as it takes time for oxygen to mix with the CO2 you have trapped in the carboy. I use buckets for fermentation and will have to open the lid most of the way to get the sample. I've never had my beer go brown or taste stale for having done that.

I also often leave my beer in the fermenter for 2 to 4 weeks. The longer I wait, the less sediment I get in the bottles and I'm pretty certain it will be completely fermented by the 3 week period.
 

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What temperature has your beer/fermenter been at? Have the temps been steady or fluctuating from day to night?
For example, beer will ferment much faster at 27°C than at 20°C, and could be (mostly) done fermenting in 3 days at higher temps.

It's usually best to control those temps and keep them steady around the lower end of your yeast's range, it makes better tasting beer. Then when things have slowed down, say, after 7-10 days you could increase the temps a few degrees, to keep her engaged.
Once the main event is over, the yeast still works, conditioning your beer, removing byproducts. Once she is clear (or almost clear) she's done.

As others said, give it 2 weeks before taking a gravity reading.* Then again 4-7 days later; if the same, it's ready to bottle.

* it could be finished earlier, but until you learn the signs of that, stick to 2 weeks.
 

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I use buckets for fermentation and will have to open the lid most of the way to get the sample.
It's better and easy to take a "suck-sample" through the airlock hole using a 2' piece of skinny 1/4" or 5/16" OD tubing. ;)

Far less exposure to air/oxygen that way compared to opening the lid.
4 ounces of beer removed, 4 ounce of air ingress.

Or push that sample out with CO2 or have your cold crash balloon supply it.
 
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Thank you for answering.
At the higher ends 22-26 and just for one day when I was out it reached 29. But I controlled it the same evening.
 
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Unless you are making a NEIPA a little oxidation isn't going to ruin the beer. The only way to be sure the beer is done is to take a sample. Try to limit how long you have the carboy open as it takes time for oxygen to mix with the CO2 you have trapped in the carboy. I use buckets for fermentation and will have to open the lid most of the way to get the sample. I've never had my beer go brown or taste stale for having done that.

I also often leave my beer in the fermenter for 2 to 4 weeks. The longer I wait, the less sediment I get in the bottles and I'm pretty certain it will be completely fermented by the 3 week period.
I'm planning to leave it for 2 weeks and than take a sample as you said.
 

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At the higher ends 22-26 and just for one day when I was out it reached 29. But I controlled it the same evening.
For your next brew, look into keeping the temps lower, and more constant. Many brewers use a "ferm chamber" that's temperature controlled, such as a refrigerator with an externally controlled thermostat.

Or a swamp cooler, many variations on those.

Or an (insulated) beverage cooler containing your fermenter and just enough water so the fermenter won't start to float yet. This water jacket will keep temps more steady. Add a few frozen water bottles every 12-24 hours to keep the temps down. Cover the whole thing with a thick blanket or sleeping bag to keep "the cold inside." I still use one of those when my ferm chamber is spoken for already.
 

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What temperature has your beer/fermenter been at? Have the temps been steady or fluctuating from day to night?
For example, beer will ferment much faster at 27°C than at 20°C, and could be (mostly) done fermenting in 3 days at higher temps.

It's usually best to control those temps and keep them steady around the lower end of your yeast's range, it makes better tasting beer. Then when things have slowed down, say, after 7-10 days you could increase the temps a few degrees, to keep her engaged.
Once the main event is over, the yeast still works, conditioning your beer, removing byproducts. Once she is clear (or almost clear) she's done.

As others said, give it 2 weeks before taking a gravity reading.* Then again 4-7 days later; if the same, it's ready to bottle.

* it could be finished earlier, but until you learn the signs of that, stick to 2 weeks.
I was going to go down this road to. But a little more drastic. If the temp it was be held at dropped below the recommended level, it may have stalled/slowed down, appearing to be ‘done’ then as ambient temperature increased back to normal, activity picked up again. This would explain the start and stop and start again?
 
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You still seemed too concerned with bubbles. Bubbles tell you nothing.
It's been 8 days since brewed.
The beer looks golden yellow. With a bit fruity and piney smell. (Centennial hops).
Didn't open the carboy, just smelled through the airlock 😁
Any suggestions? From here on.
 

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Any suggestions? From here on.
Ignore it for the next week to two weeks, then take a hydrometer sample to see if it really is done. Take a second reading 2 days later. If the readings are near what the expected final gravity should be and they match, bottle it up. Then wait another 3 weeks before you start drinking as it takes about that long for carbonation to be complete, the beer mature for best flavor, and for the heading compounds to be finished. Opening sooner may get you carbonated beer that lacks heading.

To occupy your time while this beer finishes, brew another batch. Maybe brew the third batch as soon as you bottle the first to have something to occupy your mind while you first beer matures.

This is a hobby that requires patience and is addictive.
 
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Ignore it for the next week to two weeks, then take a hydrometer sample to see if it is done. Take a second reading 2 days later. If the readings are near what the expected final gravity should be and they match, bottle it up. Then wait another 3 weeks before you start drinking as it takes about that long for carbonation to be complete, the beer mature for best flavor, and for the heading compounds to be finished. Opening sooner may get you a carbonated beer that lacks heading.

To occupy your time while this beer finishes, brew another batch. Maybe brew the third batch as soon as you bottle the first to have something to occupy your mind while your first beer matures.

This is a hobby that requires patience and is addictive.
That sounds good 👍
I'm brewing for the first time, that's why I'm confused.
But you guys are helping me from the initial stage, every question that I asked got answered beautifully.
Thank you all members ❤️😌
 

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That sounds good 👍
I'm brewing for the first time, that's why I'm confused.
But you guys are helping me from the initial stage, every question that I asked got answered beautifully.
Thank you all members ❤️😌
It looks like you're going about it the right way - looking at why things happen, and not just what the instructions say. Besides improving your beer, that makes brewing a fascinating hobby.
 

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I whole heartedly go along with ignore it for another week or two. In fact I usually don't take SG readings of the beer in the fermenter until it starts to clean up and you can begin to see across the trub layer to the other side.

Sometimes that's taken up to 5 or 6 weeks, but for the stuff I've been brewing lately only about 10 to 14 days.

And longer times in the FV have always been good to great beers. In general, the beers I rushed were disappointing. There is stuff going on with the beer even when fermentation finishes. Fermentation is only the creation of alcohol and CO2. Which for the most part only takes a short time. Yeast do more than just ferment your beer.

Waiting for the beer to clean up on it's own means I don't have to cold crash and/or do gelatin. But if that's your thing and you can't be patient, then go for it!
 
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An update.
It's the 10th day of the fermentation and the fermentation is highly slowed. But something I noticed tiny things that are floating inside the beer. I'm attaching pictures (ignore the flashlight and scratches on carboy 😁) just beneath the top layer something is popping from the bottom and attaching itself to the top and some are stuck in between. From above (Top view) there's nothing and is crystal clear. But from a side view, some small patches and tiny balls structure are floating.
My carboy is blue, and it looks like a greyish thing is floating.
Is this some sort of infection or mere yeasts? Any advice would be a great help ☺️
 

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IslandLizard

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Is this some sort of infection or mere yeasts?
Most likely clumps of yeast (they're tan) that got stuck against the walls. Could be a mixture of things, such as bits of hops or Irish moss, if you added that, but unlikely to be an infection.

While you can't see infections inside your beer, there are other tell tales: Usually souring, and production off flavors and aromas, some can be truly disgusting, and pellicles.

Infections are caused by bacteria and wild yeasts, some may throw a pellicle, which is a haze or a layer, looking like a fabric mat floating on top of your beer. We have a thread on pellicles, in case you want to look at some.
 

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Here, this is an infection:
 
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Most likely clumps of yeast (they're tan) that got stuck against the walls. Could be a mixture of things, such as bits of hops or Irish moss, if you added that, but unlikely to be an infection.

While you can't see infections inside your beer, there are other tell tales: Usually souring, and production off flavors and aromas, some can be truly disgusting, and pellicles.

Infections are caused by bacteria and wild yeasts, some may throw a pellicle, which is a haze or a layer, looking like a fabric mat floating on top of your beer. We have a thread on pellicles, in case you want to look at some.
Is this normal? Some are stuck in between some are floating up to the surface some are tanking.
From top it is clear. 🤔
 

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You worry too much :)
Totally understandable, but just let it go. Taste when bottling or kegging and you'll know, but remember that warm, uncarbonated beer tastes quite different from the final thing!

Good tip I got recently: once you have taken your hydrometer sg reading, put the sample in the fridge and then use a soda streamer (if you have one) to carb it
 
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You worry too much :)
Totally understandable, but just let it go. Taste when bottling or kegging and you'll know, but remember that warm, uncarbonated beer tastes quite different from the final thing!

Good tip I got recently: once you have taken your hydrometer sg reading, put the sample in the fridge and then use a soda streamer (if you have one) to carb it
😌 🙏 haha. Lots of anxiousness and nervousness( beginners fallacy ) 🙃
 
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An update:
Finally beer got settled, on the 10th day and as you guys suggested to take a sample for gravity reading. Surprisingly the gravity is 1.003 that means 7.74% ABV. That means a strong beer brewed. I don't think I'll have to take other reading. I'm planning to bottle it.
Any suggestions?🙂
Note - OG was 1.062
 

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That's an unusually high 95% apparent attenuation for S04, which typically goes 72-75%, so I am a little surprised.

I also would say to wait more. 10 days since brew day is not a long time, and I would say wait another week.
 
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