Estimating FG based off of sparge temp changes?

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dirtyb15

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I have been using brewtarget exclusively since i started with AG. I love the software, but trying to figure out how to lower the FG a little on a recipe. Its an IPA and after entering everything in, Brewtarget is saying it will have an FG of around 1.018. I typicaly mash at around 152-153 degrees. Im under the impression that if i lower that temperature to say 150, i should get a lower FG right? If this is true, it does not look like Brewtarget accounts for that, or i am entering something incorrectly. How do i determine what mash temperature will do to FG and any other affected variables?

Thanks!
 

jdauria

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Just tried that in BeerSmith and lowering mash temp did lower the estimated FG. Just for an FYI, lowered the recipe from 152 to 148 and BeerSmith lowered the FG 3 points.

Your post heading though says sparge temp changes, is that a typo and you meant mash? I don't believe changes to sparge temps will change the FG.
 
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dirtyb15

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Sorry, yes Mash Temp. Okay, good to know. Thanks for the info!
 

shtoive87

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I believe the rule of thumb is you will get 1% more attenuation per degree Fahrenheit. I'm sure it varies widely, but it gives a good idea of how mash temps affect the outcome of the beer.
 

BobBailey

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Simple sugar is the best way to lower FG and dry out an IPA. Just substitute 3/4 pound of sugar for a pound of base malt and add to your kettle after hot break. I like turbinado personally, but even plain old table sugar works well.
 

WoodlandBrew

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Here is a compilation of data from 3 sources showing mash temperature vs attenuation.
http://www.woodlandbrew.com/2013/01/measured-mash-temperature-effects.html

Even within the same sets of data the results have significant deviation. Generally a lower longer mash will be more fermentable, but it may be difficult to predict final gravity within one point.

Also, fwiw, here is some information on uses sugar to lower final gravity:
http://www.woodlandbrew.com/2012/12/final-gravity-in-recipe-formulation.html
 

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