English Ales - What's your favorite recipe?

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DBhomebrew

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WLP-037 is now available! Just ordered some through my very excellent LHBS's group buy.

You don't have to recirculate fermenting wort periodically during active fermentation, like I do, but be confident to rouse it with a spoon or something occasionally during active fermentation, not before or after.

Pitched a fresh vial of WLP037 yesterday morning into a gallon of starter. I also boiled that starter with 30 IBUs of Fuggle.

Here we are at 24hrs with a rousing. Smells malty, fruity, spicy, bubblegum-y.

20220925_075837.jpg
 

HM-2

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British Strong now on tap after about three weeks conditioning.

PXL-20220925-133756673-PORTRAIT.jpg


Very happy with the colour. Flavour is almost spot on, though I think it could have done with slightly (~5 IBU) more bitterness as it's marginally more malt forward than I wanted.

No idea what's going on with the clarity. It's had Protafloc in the kettle, Brausol in the fermenter, was filtered (178 micron) at packaging time AND had gelatin in the keg.

77% Simpson's pale MO
5% Warminster CaraGold
5% Munton's wheat malt
5% Crisp 100 EBC extra light crystal
2% Simpson's DRC

Balance 6% made up with Lyle's golden syrup.

26 IBU of Jester and 12 of Olicana T45 in the boil at 30m
50g Opus and 25g T45 Olicana in the whirlpool.

Copitch of Lallemand London and S-04 for a 1.017 finish.
 

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British Strong now on tap after about three weeks conditioning.

PXL-20220925-133756673-PORTRAIT.jpg


Very happy with the colour. Flavour is almost spot on, though I think it could have done with slightly (~5 IBU) more bitterness as it's marginally more malt forward than I wanted.

No idea what's going on with the clarity. It's had Protafloc in the kettle, Brausol in the fermenter, was filtered (178 micron) at packaging time AND had gelatin in the keg.

77% Simpson's pale MO
5% Warminster CaraGold
5% Munton's wheat malt
5% Crisp 100 EBC extra light crystal
2% Simpson's DRC

Balance 6% made up with Lyle's golden syrup.

26 IBU of Jester and 12 of Olicana T45 in the boil at 30m
50g Opus and 25g T45 Olicana in the whirlpool.

Copitch of Lallemand London and S-04 for a 1.017 finish.
I like that everybody seems to start some dry yeast copitching experiments. Less work for me to do :D.

How would you describe this particular mix of yeasts? I was actually also thinking about it. At the moment, I am bottle conditioning a bitter which had 1 pack of lallemand London ale and half a park of Nottingham. This one tastes promising. Only thing is, it's not as clear as it would be with pure Nottingham at this stage. But I'm confident that this will settle. Taste wise, it seems to go into the right direction, we will see.

How is the yeasts expression of your mix?
 

HM-2

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How is the yeasts expression of your mix?
Pretty similar to London on it's own, truth be told. Which is what I expected and hoped for. I would describe as a touch of apple or maybe pear, and a slight nuttiness which I also get from the likes of WLP002 (Fuller's). Definitely helps elevate some of the dried fruit and honey character from the malt bill, but without leaving it over sweet or cloying like London can be on its own, especially in a higher gravity beer.

The S-04 seems to boost attenuation (important in a 1.072 OG wort I still wanted to finish fairly dry) without losing the richer and more complex body, and seemed to aid flocculation...and did little else I can identify. Which I'd basically all I wanted it to do!
 

Miraculix

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Pretty similar to London on it's own, truth be told. Which is what I expected and hoped for. I would describe as a touch of apple or maybe pear, and a slight nuttiness which I also get from the likes of WLP002 (Fuller's). Definitely helps elevate some of the dried fruit and honey character from the malt bill, but without leaving it over sweet or cloying like London can be on its own, especially in a higher gravity beer.

The S-04 seems to boost attenuation (important in a 1.072 OG wort I still wanted to finish fairly dry) without losing the richer and more complex body, and seemed to aid flocculation...and did little else I can identify. Which I'd basically all I wanted it to do!
Nice, that sounds like what I was trying to achieve with copitching Nottingham. Good to know that both seem to work. And as S04 has much more character than Notti, I might try this combination in my next bitter... Ok, after I finally checked Mangrove Jacks Liberty Bell Ale. I bought it, so I am gonna use it!
 
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McMullan

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Pitched a fresh vial of WLP037 yesterday morning into a gallon of starter. I also boiled that starter with 30 IBUs of Fuggle.

Here we are at 24hrs with a rousing. Smells malty, fruity, spicy, bubblegum-y.

View attachment 781861
Looks good for a direct pitch @24h. Key to rousing is to get yeast off the bottom of the FV as well as stirring them back into the wort from the yeast head. Harvest about 60% of the yeast head when it peaks. I reckon you could start harvesting tomorrow. Just spoon some of the yeast head into a large sanitised jar then store it in the fridge. Maybe 2-3 crops into the same jar. Then repitch as soon as possible while it's fresh, a few to several days. It gets more active after one or two repitches.
 

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Added gelatin last night. Might keg it next weekend.

Kegged it two days ago. Not clear at all, still tastes a bit yeasty. Based on this so far, I would not use London Fog again for any British ales. I was hoping it could be dual use (British and NEIPA), but 002 is far more enjoyable.

I had 3oz of EKG at 15 for 12.5 gallons post boil, and it tastes too hoppy. This yeast may also accentuate hops more than my usual 002.

I'll update in a couple few weeks once it conditions some more.
 

DBhomebrew

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Pitched a fresh vial of WLP037 yesterday morning into a gallon of starter. I also boiled that starter with 30 IBUs of Fuggle.

Here we are at 24hrs with a rousing. Smells malty, fruity, spicy, bubblegum-y.

View attachment 781861

Roused again at 36hrs. Super thick and creamy.

Krausen falling at 48. Cropped and roused. Clearly quieting down.

At 72hrs, no rousing. Nothing to crop. Smells great, like rich caramel. Gravity sample, 1048 down to 1009. Very green, sharp. Nothing too offensive. A pinch of Fuggle dry hop.

20220926_200839.jpg
 

Erik the Anglophile

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Have been searching for an answer to this question in Pat's Porter! but to no avail.
Many of the stout and porter recipes have a listed AA in the low to high-ish 60%, I know that even mid strength porters (1.050-55-ish) ones would have been vatted in wood barrels for half a year or so before being bottled or shipped out to publicans.
I myself brewed a porter from the late 1800's era that finished at 66%AA, but how are the chances it would have in reality been more attenuated due to brett exposure in the barrels? Most of the beers have quite hefty doses of brown, amber and black malt, often with some crystal aswell so I doubt even brett would chew it down more than maybe ~10 points.
But 66 vs 76% AA is still quite the difference in the final product...
 

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Putting together a bit of a recipe for a strong-ish English IPA, designed to be a bit of old-meets-new in terms of ingredients and processes. Something to brew a bit later in the autumn, as for some reason I always get a bit of a hankering for British IPAs when the trees start to shed their leaves.

ABV: 6.8%
OG: 1.065
FG: 1.013
EBC: 16
IBU: 55
BU/GU: 0.84

Malt-wise, want to keep it fairly middle of the road in terms of EBC, with some honey and light caramel character. Quite keen to try Chevalier as it's not that much more expensive than decent MO for me, and supposedly has a great, almost fruity character to it.

MaltMaltsterQuantityPercentage
Chevalier HeritageCrisp5,334 g85%
Cara GoldCrisp521 g8%
Wheat MaltCrisp260 g4%
Extra Light Crystal 100Crisp195 g3%

Hops, I'm going a mixture of more traditional British styles alongside some of the newer and more exciting stuff to come out of Charles Faram (I've got about a kilo of assorted British hops coming from the Malt Miller, my usual go-to supplier. I wanted to keep some of the classics and favourites in there (notably UK Target and First Gold), but spice (or fruit) things up with some experimental CF185 (floral, peach and citrus) and Harlequin (passion fruit and mango). By my standards not an especially large amount of hops (75g as bittering additions, 100g in the whirlpool and 125 in the dry hop) but should remain roughly to style.

HopFormIBUs/QuantityStage
TargetT90 Pellet30.660 Minute Boil
First GoldT90 Pellet15.715 Minute Boil
First Gold T90 Pellet 3.720 Minute Whirlpool @75°C
HarlequinT90 Pellet4.720 Minute Whirlpool @75°C
HarlequinT90 Pellet 60 gDry Hop Day 7
CF185T90 Pellet 50 gDry Hop Day 7
TargetT90 Pellet 20 gDry Hop Day 7

I'll also drop another 50g of CF185 straight into the keg at packaging time.

Plan is to mash fairly low, do a longer than normal boil (I generally only ever do 30m boils these days, and then ferment on the cooler end with WLP007 Dry English Ale before ramping.
 

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Putting together a bit of a recipe for a strong-ish English IPA, designed to be a bit of old-meets-new in terms of ingredients and processes. Something to brew a bit later in the autumn, as for some reason I always get a bit of a hankering for British IPAs when the trees start to shed their leaves.

ABV: 6.8%
OG: 1.065
FG: 1.013
EBC: 16
IBU: 55
BU/GU: 0.84

Malt-wise, want to keep it fairly middle of the road in terms of EBC, with some honey and light caramel character. Quite keen to try Chevalier as it's not that much more expensive than decent MO for me, and supposedly has a great, almost fruity character to it.

MaltMaltsterQuantityPercentage
Chevalier HeritageCrisp5,334 g85%
Cara GoldCrisp521 g8%
Wheat MaltCrisp260 g4%
Extra Light Crystal 100Crisp195 g3%

Hops, I'm going a mixture of more traditional British styles alongside some of the newer and more exciting stuff to come out of Charles Faram (I've got about a kilo of assorted British hops coming from the Malt Miller, my usual go-to supplier. I wanted to keep some of the classics and favourites in there (notably UK Target and First Gold), but spice (or fruit) things up with some experimental CF185 (floral, peach and citrus) and Harlequin (passion fruit and mango). By my standards not an especially large amount of hops (75g as bittering additions, 100g in the whirlpool and 125 in the dry hop) but should remain roughly to style.

HopFormIBUs/QuantityStage
TargetT90 Pellet30.660 Minute Boil
First GoldT90 Pellet15.715 Minute Boil
First GoldT90 Pellet3.720 Minute Whirlpool @75°C
HarlequinT90 Pellet4.720 Minute Whirlpool @75°C
HarlequinT90 Pellet60 gDry Hop Day 7
CF185T90 Pellet50 gDry Hop Day 7
TargetT90 Pellet20 gDry Hop Day 7

I'll also drop another 50g of CF185 straight into the keg at packaging time.

Plan is to mash fairly low, do a longer than normal boil (I generally only ever do 30m boils these days, and then ferment on the cooler end with WLP007 Dry English Ale before ramping.
Big NO NO NO from me regarding the malt bill if you use chevallier.

Chevallier wants to be used ALONE. It is the perfect malt for what you are describing what you're after. Everything else you might add would turn the end result less incredible. Chevallier does not need any help in terms of flavour. It is superior on its own. In terms of foam, you might leave the wheat, but I actually would not. I'd go 100% chevallier.

Actually.... Now I want to brew a chevallier UK IPA :D.

Regarding the hops keep it simple and don't overdo late and dry additions. I think you actually overdo it, but that's probably a matter of taste. If I would do UK IPA, I wouldn't go beyond 50g late and 50g dry additions.
 
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Erik the Anglophile

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I plan to dry hop for the first time ever my next brew, a pale/light bitter.
20L in the fermenter and ~21L post boil GP as base 1/3 of grains as Vienna, 10% invert 2 OG 1.042 and high 30's IBU.

Late additions will be 0.7g/L First Gold 20 min and 1g/L Fuggle/First Gold 50/50 for a 20 min/80c hopstand.
The dry hop will be a modest 8g of the same hop mix as the hopstand, will likely just chuck em in with the yeast and ferment with the hops in, keg after ~10 days.
 

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I have recipe for Dr Hexler’s Healer but cannot find Sovereign, Bramling Cross, or First Gold. Does anyone have a source for UK hops?
 

tracer bullet

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I have recipe for Dr Hexler’s Healer but cannot find Sovereign, Bramling Cross, or First Gold. Does anyone have a source for UK hops?
I ordered First Gold from Northwest Hop Farms earlier this year. It shows as a 2019 crop but I chatted with them and they promised it was packaged correctly and kept frozen and still good. I have used it and it seems OK but I don't have much to compare to (i.e. past experience with it). Northern / Midwest stopped carrying it. It's almost as if the farms have shut down or switched to something more popular.
 

Miraculix

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I have recipe for Dr Hexler’s Healer but cannot find Sovereign, Bramling Cross, or First Gold. Does anyone have a source for UK hops?
If you cannot find any, you can substitute with any nice central european hop like Saaz or Mittelfrüh. Even the Brits do that from time to time... since centuries.
 

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If you cannot find any, you can substitute with any nice central european hop like Saaz or Mittelfrüh. Even the Brits do that from time to time... since centuries.

Indeed they have, and I would add that while many British breweries do use Target for bittering, they should be used with great caution, else they can and will spoil the late additions, no matter how beautiful those may be.

For anyone having difficulty obtaining British style hops, I'd suggest 20 to 30 EBU with an obtainable non-aggressive bittering hop, then liberal late additions of Liberty. Most British beers are simple to make.
 

Miraculix

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Indeed they have, and I would add that while many British breweries do use Target for bittering, they should be used with great caution, else they can and will spoil the late additions, no matter how beautiful those may be.

For anyone having difficulty obtaining British style hops, I'd suggest 20 to 30 EBU with an obtainable non-aggressive bittering hop, then liberal late additions of Liberty. Most British beers are simple to make.
Spoiling or improving lies in the eye of the beholder.
 

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Update. Kegged today, Day #12. Krausen very Englishy (cheesy brains). Clearing but far from "clear". Taste is...I have no idea. Mild sweet fruit in background, perhaps a little mint going on, definitely no marmalade. Sorta closed transfer. OG 1.043, FG 1.007. Will check in a week or so.
1664639657443.png



1664639732372.png
 

Erik the Anglophile

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So I have done some more research and finalised a recipe for an Old Ale/KK/Stock, gonna brew a Bitter tomorrow and a historically inspired 1.065 OG Single Stout after that, but then it is time for the Old Ale.
Gonna order a Speidel 12L fermenter tun when I get payed by the end of this month, for secondary fermentation/barrel ageing emulation. I think I have a pretty clear idea about what to do but still have some questions.
This is the base beer:
Skärmbild (37).png
It will be mashed at 67c/75min and the actual yeast will be my Verdant/MJ Liberty Bell house mix, Nottingham is the closest performance wise in BS so I go with that when making recipes.
The 0min hops are actually hopstands [email protected] so the actual IBU is probably more like 65 or more.
This will be fermented as an ordinary stronger ale @~2week primary at first, then racked to the Speidel tun with French Medium toast oak cubes and Brett C added, and this is where I have some details that are not fully clear.
From what I have gathered, I should boil the oak cubes for ~10 min or so before putting them in the fermenter, rack the beer and add the Brett, all clear, but then? Just leave it in a somewhat warm place for ~3 months and check gravity and if it is reasonably low check again after 2 weeks to see if it has changed or not? I think I understand that for this ale a reasonable post-Brett FG would be in the low teens.
Dry hops? should they be added at primay fermentation or when I rack to secondary, as a sort of "cask hopping"?
Should I add some campden tablets a day or 2 before bottling to kill the Brett and use CBC1 to bottle with, or use the remaining Brett to carbonate, I suppose even Brett has it's limitations in how complex sugars it can manage to eat or do I risk bottle bombs then? The Beer will be sat at room temp to carb up for ~2months then cellared for about 6 before I try the first bottle.
What water to aim for? I have been using Graham Wheelers profiles and find them very nice for Brittish beers, and I am contemplating his sweet pale or mild profiles, so either slightly sulfate forward or slightly chloride forward.
@DBhomebrew I understand you made a Bretted Old Ale not too long ago, any input/advice?
 

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So I have done some more research and finalised a recipe for an Old Ale/KK/Stock, gonna brew a Bitter tomorrow and a historically inspired 1.065 OG Single Stout after that, but then it is time for the Old Ale.
Gonna order a Speidel 12L fermenter tun when I get payed by the end of this month, for secondary fermentation/barrel ageing emulation. I think I have a pretty clear idea about what to do but still have some questions.
This is the base beer:
View attachment 783655 It will be mashed at 67c/75min and the actual yeast will be my Verdant/MJ Liberty Bell house mix, Nottingham is the closest performance wise in BS so I go with that when making recipes.
The 0min hops are actually hopstands [email protected] so the actual IBU is probably more like 65 or more.
This will be fermented as an ordinary stronger ale @~2week primary at first, then racked to the Speidel tun with French Medium toast oak cubes and Brett C added, and this is where I have some details that are not fully clear.
From what I have gathered, I should boil the oak cubes for ~10 min or so before putting them in the fermenter, rack the beer and add the Brett, all clear, but then? Just leave it in a somewhat warm place for ~3 months and check gravity and if it is reasonably low check again after 2 weeks to see if it has changed or not? I think I understand that for this ale a reasonable post-Brett FG would be in the low teens.
Dry hops? should they be added at primay fermentation or when I rack to secondary, as a sort of "cask hopping"?
Should I add some campden tablets a day or 2 before bottling to kill the Brett and use CBC1 to bottle with, or use the remaining Brett to carbonate, I suppose even Brett has it's limitations in how complex sugars it can manage to eat or do I risk bottle bombs then? The Beer will be sat at room temp to carb up for ~2months then cellared for about 6 before I try the first bottle.
What water to aim for? I have been using Graham Wheelers profiles and find them very nice for Brittish beers, and I am contemplating his sweet pale or mild profiles, so either slightly sulfate forward or slightly chloride forward.
@DBhomebrew I understand you made a Bretted Old Ale not too long ago, any input/advice?
Are you adding the oak cubes to be historically accurate or because you want to taste what the oak will contribute? My understanding is that that English brewers did everything to avoid the flavor of the wood and wanted neutral barrels and that wood-aged beer to get that barrel influence is a very modern method. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. Just curious what you are going for.
 

Erik the Anglophile

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Both, I would say, I do like oaky flavour, but it should be kept rather subtle and aged to "mellow out".
Mostly to be historically accurate as a beer of this type would have been aged in a wood cask, might skip the wood if oak flavour is something to avoid, or keep the "dosage" rather low at least, like 1g oak/Liter.
Even if they tried to minimize the flavour contribution it must have had some effect, so a light oak flavour should be accurate.
 

Miraculix

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Both, I would say, I do like oaky flavour, but it should be kept rather subtle and aged to "mellow out".
Mostly to be historically accurate as a beer of this type would have been aged in a wood cask, might skip the wood if oak flavour is something to avoid, or keep the "dosage" rather low at least, like 1g oak/Liter.
Even if they tried to minimize the flavour contribution it must have had some effect, so a light oak flavour should be accurate.
In my humble opinion, Oak does not benefit beer at all, so I would leave it out completely.
 

Erik the Anglophile

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Might skip the oak then.
But anyone have any input on the practical ageing ideas? Never worked with Brett before so I am not 100% sure on exactly how to do it.
Oh and the actual malt is Golden Promise, but BS only has MO...
 

Witherby

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Might skip the oak then.
But anyone have any input on the practical ageing ideas? Never worked with Brett before so I am not 100% sure on exactly how to do it.
Oh and the actual malt is Golden Promise, but BS only has MO...
I think the weakest part of the recent Wood & Beer book is the complete disregard of English brewing and the use of wood fermenters and barrels from porter to old ale and everything in between. This is particularly frustrating because Brewers Publications had just published Michael Tonsmeire’s book on wild ale which has a great discussion of Brett and wood and English stock ale. For the history of wood aging in English brewing see chapter 15 (“Wood Aged Beer”) in Martin Cornell’s book Amber, Gold and Black.
 

Miraculix

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I think the weakest part of the recent Wood & Beer book is the complete disregard of English brewing and the use of wood fermenters and barrels from porter to old ale and everything in between. This is particularly frustrating because Brewers Publications had just published Michael Tonsmeire’s book on wild ale which has a great discussion of Brett and wood and English stock ale. For the history of wood aging in English brewing see chapter 15 (“Wood Aged Beer”) in Martin Cornell’s book Amber, Gold and Black.
Weren't the casks usually coated from the inside to inhibit woody flavour in the beer?
 

Witherby

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Weren't the casks usually coated from the inside to inhibit woody flavour in the beer?
Not in England. That is a continental practice.

 

HM-2

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This is the base beer:
This looks a really good base, though personally I would be upping the DRC and heritage and probably pushing the Vienna down to maybe 20% of the grist. The DRC "sweet spot" for me is usually around 5% of grist, and though I've not used it in combination with Heritage I often do alongside Crisp Extra Light Crystal (100 EBC) at roughly 8%.
 

Erik the Anglophile

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I could see that in a more modern beer, but as this is meant to be an approximation of a turn of the century KK ale I keep the specialty malts low, Vienna is a subtitute for mild malt.
The thing I am wondering most about is the Brett and bottling, I would like to avoid bottle bombs so will the brett finish at 80-85% AA or will it slowly eat ALL remaining sugar?
And should I add dry hops in primary or secondary? I know they often added dry hops to casks at racking before secondary fermentation, so I guess chucking the hops in when racking to secondary would be historically accurate.
 

DBhomebrew

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So I have done some more research and finalised a recipe for an Old Ale/KK/Stock, gonna brew a Bitter tomorrow and a historically inspired 1.065 OG Single Stout after that, but then it is time for the Old Ale.
Gonna order a Speidel 12L fermenter tun when I get payed by the end of this month, for secondary fermentation/barrel ageing emulation. I think I have a pretty clear idea about what to do but still have some questions.
This is the base beer:
View attachment 783655 It will be mashed at 67c/75min and the actual yeast will be my Verdant/MJ Liberty Bell house mix, Nottingham is the closest performance wise in BS so I go with that when making recipes.
The 0min hops are actually hopstands [email protected] so the actual IBU is probably more like 65 or more.
This will be fermented as an ordinary stronger ale @~2week primary at first, then racked to the Speidel tun with French Medium toast oak cubes and Brett C added, and this is where I have some details that are not fully clear.
From what I have gathered, I should boil the oak cubes for ~10 min or so before putting them in the fermenter, rack the beer and add the Brett, all clear, but then? Just leave it in a somewhat warm place for ~3 months and check gravity and if it is reasonably low check again after 2 weeks to see if it has changed or not? I think I understand that for this ale a reasonable post-Brett FG would be in the low teens.
Dry hops? should they be added at primay fermentation or when I rack to secondary, as a sort of "cask hopping"?
Should I add some campden tablets a day or 2 before bottling to kill the Brett and use CBC1 to bottle with, or use the remaining Brett to carbonate, I suppose even Brett has it's limitations in how complex sugars it can manage to eat or do I risk bottle bombs then? The Beer will be sat at room temp to carb up for ~2months then cellared for about 6 before I try the first bottle.
What water to aim for? I have been using Graham Wheelers profiles and find them very nice for Brittish beers, and I am contemplating his sweet pale or mild profiles, so either slightly sulfate forward or slightly chloride forward.
@DBhomebrew I understand you made a Bretted Old Ale not too long ago, any input/advice?

Congrats on your decision to brew one of these. Yes, I've got one in the cellar, bottled about 5 weeks ago. I did open the bottle with the bottling bucket dregs a few evenings ago, but it's not quite conditioned yet.

For oak flavor history-wise, I'll let the historians speak. Flavor-wise, I'll describe what I've got.

First, I brewed one of my Traquair House approximations with med Hungarian cubes in primary to attempt a nod toward their oak fermentation vessels. Too much. 1oz/~3.5USgal. A year later, it's mellowed enough to be enjoyable but it's still too upfront. I'll be brewing another very soon, likely cutting the oak by half or two thirds.

Second, the old ale. Very much a rendition of the 11-11-11 Gunstock Ale here on HBT. Same med Hungarian cubes, .75oz/3USgal, in secondary. Better than the Traq, but next time I'll likely reduce it a bit. Probably 1/2oz for the 3gal.

I think the best oak dosage gives just enough tannic mouth feel without a ton of flavor. It should be a whiff, not a bat in the teeth. Err on too little.

Yes, I boiled for 10m and did not use the resultant oak tea. That went down the drain, drained cubes into the beer.

I used a sacc/brett blend. Four weeks in primary brought 1.091 down to 1.023. Racked to secondary over oak and dry hops, it continued on down to 1.014 at about eight or nine months. This was stable for another month. Bottled and primed as I normally would. Table sugar or demerara, no sulfites, no extra yeast.

Dry hops in secondary, absolutely. For reasons other than aroma. Hops are antiseptic and help break down the larger sugars for the brett to eat.

That taster bottle from the other evening. The beer's delicious. Any brett flavor is mild and well-balanced. Nothing in the realm of funky, barnyard, etc. As a blend, mine was co-pitched in primary. You may get a more prominent brett character by pitching the brett into a higher stress environment.

If I were to name a fault, I think it's the flameout/whirlpool hops. They leave a oily/resiny impression of which I'm not a fan. I've got an OBE that's suffering from the same thing but worse. I went through a phase last year where I tried to get dry hop affects through heavy late additions. Not anymore. Now I'm doing FWH, top of boil, and nothing after 30m except a small dry hop. H/t to @McMullan for actually sharing a study regarding boil times.

As a whole, I think your time frame for secondary is too short. 2-4 weeks primary, sure. 6-9 months for secondary. A few more for the bottle. CBC [probably] wouldn't hurt, might reduce the bottle conditioning time.

 
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Erik the Anglophile

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Thank you for the informative post.
Might do a heftier 20 min addition and ditch the hopstand then.
Probably gonna add the 1g/L intended for hopstand at 20 min instead in my bitter tomorrow, and keep the 0.5g/intended to be tossed in at yeast pitch...
 
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