English Ales - What's your favorite recipe?

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Erik the Anglophile

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Ís ok snœrs ok miðnótts boði landi frá komum
The grist for my best/premium bitter as of now is
MO as base
Biscuit 4%
Crisp C-240 5%
Invert #3 6%
OG 1.042 FG 1.010
Might switch to my dry house yeast for my bitters as it has pretty good character but it does not attenuate as well as my current so I will probably up the OG a little bit. This with 5% flaked barley might get me a little chewier body. @DBhomebrew
 

schmurf

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The grist for my best/premium bitter as of now is
MO as base
Biscuit 4%
Crisp C-240 5%
Invert #3 6%
OG 1.042 FG 1.010
Might switch to my dry house yeast for my bitters as it has pretty good character but it does not attenuate as well as my current so I will probably up the OG a little bit. This with 5% flaked barley might get me a little chewier body. @DBhomebrew
Do you really need the biscuit here you think?
 

cire

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So I've been brewing a few batches of bitters with invert, and I really like the flavour it contributes.
But I find it thins out the body a bit, and thought of adding something like 3-5% flaked barley to give it a little thicker mouthfeel, yay or nay?
Also been using Northdown hops a bit, I really like the flavour/aroma of them, kinda tastes like what it smells when you walk in a damp pineforest during autumn. Might try them with Bramling X 50/50 for flavour and aroma additions, anyone got any experience with this combo?
An absolute must. Next week's brew will be rather similar, but with more flaked barley,

R0010256.JPG


The 1944 recipe above has uses 13 quarters of base malts, 2 quarters of flaked barley, 1/2 a quarter of DCL (malt extract), and 3 quarters of invert sugar (in solid form). The hops were probably Goldings in the kettle and Fuggles for dry hopping in the casks.

The grains for my 50 litre brew are already weighed and milled.
4.5 kg Pale Malt
1.5 kg Vienna Malt
0.75 kg Flaked Barley

Tomorrow the invert sugar will be produced from 1 kg of cane sugar with a small addition of Black Treacle with expected finished weight of ~ 1.3 kg. 0.25 kg Malt Extract (liquid) will also be added to the boil.

Hops are currently intended to be Northdown early and Bramling Cross late.
 

kmarkstevens

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So I've been brewing a few batches of bitters with invert, and I really like the flavour it contributes.
But I find it thins out the body a bit, and thought of adding something like 3-5% flaked barley to give it a little thicker mouthfeel, yay or nay?
Also been using Northdown hops a bit, I really like the flavour/aroma of them, kinda tastes like what it smells when you walk in a damp pineforest during autumn. Might try them with Bramling X 50/50 for flavour and aroma additions, anyone got any experience with this combo?
Paging @Northern_Brewer, who IIRC prefers a 60% EKG and 40% BX combination. I have found the 60-40 split to be pretty tasty as well.

Here is a quote from NB: There's very few British-style beers that aren't improved with some Goldings as a dry hop IMO - even better if they're green hops, but I know how privileged I am to be able to say that... from the AK thread: (308) Your favourite AK recipe? | Page 2 | Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

You might try a couple of ounces of torrified wheat for a thicker mouth feel. I believe torrified wheat is more used in the North.

A member here was cleaning out his yeast bank and gifted me both Essex Ale and Manchester Yeast. :rock: I've re-cultured the Essex and done a first 3 gallon 1030 recipe (and shared out this flocculating yeast to the gang at the local HBS). Going to take a crack at re-vitalizing the Manchester Ale tonight. I picked up the mixings already 30 mjnutes ago for Tony's Pre-1970 Boddington's Clone Recipe (boakandbailey.com)
 

Erik the Anglophile

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I will ditch the wlp005 and use the english dry yeast I use as my house strain instead. It attenuates a bit lower and that combined with bumping up OG a little bit might make the next batch a little "fuller". If not I'll try a little flaked wheat or barley, that might come in handy in ales using higher amounts of invert as well.
 

UdonPete

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Homemade English Ale (Grain) Recipe
Ingredients:
  • 2.8 kg pale ale malt;
  • 400 gr. light wheat malt;
  • 300 grams of light caramel malt;
For hopping:
  • 30 grams of East Kent Goldings hops (add 60 minutes before);
  • 20 grams of Fuggle hops (put in 15 minutes);
  • 20g East Kent Goldings hops (early boil)
  • Yeast brand S-04, WLP002, 1028;
  • Use glucose for carbonation, in an amount of 4 grams per liter.
Preparation:
  1. Mix the entire amount of malt with 10 liters of filtered water heated to 73 degrees Celsius. The mash should have a temperature not higher and not lower than 68 degrees. Withstand 1 hour.
  2. Pour boiling water into the mass, the temperature should rise to 71 ° C. Leave for 15 minutes.
  3. Filter the grain, rinse the mash with hot water heated to 78 degrees. The result should be a total wort volume of 23.5 liters.
  4. Boil the wort for 1 hour. Add hops according to the scheme.
  5. Cool, add yeast. Leave for the main fermentation for 5 days, at a temperature not higher than 22 degrees, secondary fermentation is a week. When bottled, carbonate and place in a cool place for maturation.
Thank you very much
 

bwible

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I've done yeast offs and Pub has always been the hands down winner amongst myself and the LHBS taste testers.

What do people think of First Gold vs EKG? I personally like First Gold mainly because it is pretty easy to get by the pound or half pound at a reasonable price here in the US. And I like the taste. Don't get an really obvious marmalade taste with Pub and First Gold. What's a good mash and ferment temperature to really bring out the marmalade?

(I have discovered that most C American hops taste skunked/cat piss/urinal cakes to me. Nasty. My go to's are First Gold, EKG, BX, N Brewer (UK, GER, US) & Tettnang GER).
I’ve been wrapped up in blonde ales and the quest for a decent psuedo lager recently so I haven’t brewed any bitters for awhile. I was loving First Gold the last couple times I did. I will have to do another one with all EKG again for comparison.

When I started doing bitters way back when Fuggles used to be my first choice.
 

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Now that we are cooling down in New England I’m thinking about putting some beers in Cubitainers again.

I’ve done about 4 batches in them with good success serving out a beer engine. I sold my beer engine a bit ago to simplify.

I’m going go with a gravity pour and wonder if anyone has come up with a good solution to collapse the top of the cubitainer as you pour. I did notice that some of Co2 fills that space and I’m going be putting 2.5 gallons in there to make it last a couple weeks.
 
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bwible

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I will ditch the wlp005 and use the english dry yeast I use as my house strain instead. It attenuates a bit lower and that combined with bumping up OG a little bit might make the next batch a little "fuller". If not I'll try a little flaked wheat or barley, that might come in handy in ales using higher amounts of invert as well.
I’ve been a liquid yeast guy pretty much from day 1. Because we were all told back then that the dry yeast available at the time wasn’t good. I’m coming around to the idea of trying dry yeast. Seems like people like Nottingham (Danstar?) What are other quality dry yeasts for bitter? I tend to line the numbers up for what the BJCP classifies as Special or Best Bitter. I understand there is no rhyme or reason and bitters are all over the place.
 

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I’ve been a liquid yeast guy pretty much from day 1. Because we were all told back then that the dry yeast available at the time wasn’t good. I’m coming around to the idea of trying dry yeast. Seems like people like Nottingham (Danstar?) What are other quality dry yeasts for bitter? I tend to line the numbers up for what the BJCP classifies as Special or Best Bitter. I understand there is no rhyme or reason and bitters are all over the place.
Best so far is clearly verdant IPA. Notti is ok but is really clean, so wouldn't be my choice if your are into expressive yeasts. Verdant really delivers that British character, I know of no other dry yeast that does and I tried nearly all of the British ones.
 

bwible

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I’ve been looking at water chemistry and mash ph. I find when I enter these beers with only pale malt and crystal in Bru’n Water, I’m coming up with mash ph 5.7, even after Gypsum and other additions. I haven’t ever heard of British breweries adjusting their mash with acid or acid malt? Is anybody doing that?
 

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I’ve been looking at water chemistry and mash ph. I find when I enter these beers with only pale malt and crystal in Bru’n Water, I’m coming up with mash ph 5.7, even after Gypsum and other additions. I haven’t ever heard of British breweries adjusting their mash with acid or acid malt? Is anybody doing that?
1-2% of the grist as acidualted malt does the job for me for paler beers.
 

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I’ve been a liquid yeast guy pretty much from day 1. Because we were all told back then that the dry yeast available at the time wasn’t good. I’m coming around to the idea of trying dry yeast. Seems like people like Nottingham (Danstar?) What are other quality dry yeasts for bitter?
Whilst dry yeasts have got a lot better, British strains are one area where they still generally lag behind what's available elsewhere. Verdant seems to be a significant step up on the others, although Notty and S-04 do get used by a lot of small breweries here.

I’ve been looking at water chemistry and mash ph. I find when I enter these beers with only pale malt and crystal in Bru’n Water, I’m coming up with mash ph 5.7, even after Gypsum and other additions. I haven’t ever heard of British breweries adjusting their mash with acid or acid malt? Is anybody doing that?
Acid malt only exists to let our friends with Mutti issues contort themselves with acid additions that comply with the Reinheitsgebot - British brewers ignore such nonsense and use AMS/CRS (a HCl/H2SO4 blend) as God intended. A bit of CRS is completely normal - see these articles from one of the main providers of technical services to British brewers :
 

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I have to try Verdant. I've got too many yeasties in the bank and trying to winnow down the herd.

I love Notty. It's prolly my "if you could only have one yeast forever yeast." Has a wide temperature range, flocculates well, clean, makes a good cyser, easy to work with, etc.

FYI, anyone that wants to try the vault strain WLP022 Essex Ale yeast, then ping White Labs. It's in production and some is still in stock. I signed up for two vials 6 or 9 months ago as my local HBS dude loves this yeast. Now, go figure, a homebrewtalk member cleaning out his yeast bank gifted me Essex ale and Manchester yeast slants. I recultured the Essex pretty much the day I figured out that White Labs had gone into production. Anyhoo, White Labs takes a vault strain into production when there are ~200 orders, but white labs actually makes more than 200 so whenever a vault strain is in production, there should be an opportunity to order.
 
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UdonPete

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I’ve been a liquid yeast guy pretty much from day 1. Because we were all told back then that the dry yeast available at the time wasn’t good. I’m coming around to the idea of trying dry yeast. Seems like people like Nottingham (Danstar?) What are other quality dry yeasts for bitter? I tend to line the numbers up for what the BJCP classifies as Special or Best Bitter. I understand there is no rhyme or reason and bitters are all over the place.
London
 

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I’ve heard a few people mention that Verdant ipa takes a while to clear up - is that true? It’s listed as medium to high floc.

Maybe adjuncts?

I have a packet and will be using it soon, but what I really like about s-04 is the clarity- super important to me in my English-inspired ales.
 

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I’ve heard a few people mention that Verdant ipa takes a while to clear up - is that true? It’s listed as medium to high floc.

Maybe adjuncts?

I have a packet and will be using it soon, but what I really like about s-04 is the clarity- super important to me in my English-inspired ales.
It clears up beautifully without a cold crash. It takes a bit longer then s04, but s04 is the dry yeast clearing champ, so it's a bit unfair to compare with this one imo.

Best is, the yeast tends to stick to the bottom, once fully cleared.
 

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Have you repitched that yeast yet? I’d like to use on a few consecutive brews and wonder about any concerns or if it changes character.
 

Miraculix

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Have you repitched that yeast yet? I’d like to use on a few consecutive brews and wonder about any concerns or if it changes character.
Haven't done it but wouldn't hesitate doing it. Only thing is, it develops a MASSIVE Kräusen, so make sure that you have a huge headspace for it, especially if you are planning to throw the wort directly on the yeast cake. Seriously, I never saw a Kräusen like that before.
 

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I just ordered some verdant and some mo and I have a best bitter up next. Thanks for the recommendations
I'd recommend something simple first. 5% medium-dark British crystal, rest mo. Single infusion mash at 65c, simple is king. Medium to low carbonation.

If I wouldn't have a pack of omega jevaru in the fridge that really needs to be used, I'd brew exactly that beer next.
 
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bwible

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Whilst dry yeasts have got a lot better, British strains are one area where they still generally lag behind what's available elsewhere. Verdant seems to be a significant step up on the others, although Notty and S-04 do get used by a lot of small breweries here.



Acid malt only exists to let our friends with Mutti issues contort themselves with acid additions that comply with the Reinheitsgebot - British brewers ignore such nonsense and use AMS/CRS (a HCl/H2SO4 blend) as God intended. A bit of CRS is completely normal - see these articles from one of the main providers of technical services to British brewers :
I just use acid malt because its so much easier for me. I’m brewing 3 gallon batches and I’m usually only including 1.5 - 2.5 oz. So a pound even lasts awhile. I don’t have cylinders marked in ccs to measure. I also don’t like the idea of storing a bottle of strong acid and wearing rubber gloves to handle it. Had great results since I started using it.
 

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I just use acid malt because its so much easier for me. I’m brewing 3 gallon batches and I’m usually only including 1.5 - 2.5 oz. So a pound even lasts awhile. I don’t have cylinders marked in ccs to measure. I also don’t like the idea of storing a bottle of strong acid and wearing rubber gloves to handle it. Had great results since I started using it.
Same for me. Adding 1-2% of the grist as acidulated malt is so convenient, and it just does the job.
 

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Has anyone here brewed this JW Lees Mild?


I have just about everything except the caramel colorant and will use turbinado sugar for the invert.

im going split the batch into a 2.5 gallon Cubitainer and 2.5 gallon keg. I prime my kegs and just use a co2 injector to replace the head.

Im curious to see how long it will last in the Cubitainer.
 

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Has anyone here brewed this JW Lees Mild?

I’ve brewed it a few times with great results, but I’ve used homemade invert and used Sinamar in lieu of caramel on a couple occasions (other times I’ve just skipped the coloring.

As for cubitainers, I treat them like growlers— best consumed in one evening but definitely within 24 hours.
 

bwible

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I have to try Verdant. I've got too many yeasties in the bank and trying to winnow down the herd.

I love Notty. It's prolly my "if you could only have one yeast forever yeast." Has a wide temperature range, flocculates well, clean, makes a good cyser, easy to work with, etc.

FYI, anyone that wants to try the vault strain WLP022 Essex Ale yeast, then ping White Labs. It's in production and some is still in stock. I signed up for two vials 6 or 9 months ago as my local HBS dude loves this yeast. Now, go figure, a homebrewtalk member cleaning out his yeast bank gifted me Essex ale and Manchester yeast slants. I recultured the Essex pretty much the day I figured out that White Labs had gone into production. Anyhoo, White Labs takes a vault strain into production when there are ~200 orders, but white labs actually makes more than 200 so whenever a vault strain is in production, there should be an opportunity to order.
White Labs has a couple strains I would love to get out of their vault. WLP025 Southwold Ale Yeast and WLP026 Premium Bitter Yeast. I’ve been trying to get either of these for 2 years.
 

ba-brewer

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I got WLP026 and WLP025 from the last vault purge. WLP025 was OK but the slants of it went bad for me. WLP026 is still working, I just made a starter of that which is crashing in the fridge now. It is an interesting yeast but the STA1 gene seems active as it attenuates quite low.

I have part of a tin of Black Treacle so my current plan is make a treacle flapjack oatmeal stout with the WLP026. It has a light vanilla like flavor so I plan to add some wheat and maybe do a ferulic acid rest to see if I can get it be stronger.

The follow up to use the rest of treacle will be a Parkin porter fermented with WLP038 to add the spice notes to the porter.
 

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I’ve brewed it a few times with great results, but I’ve used homemade invert and used Sinamar in lieu of caramel on a couple occasions (other times I’ve just skipped the coloring.

As for cubitainers, I treat them like growlers— best consumed in one evening but definitely within 24 hours.
Can I ask if the 1.75 hour boil time is correct ?
 

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I got the WLP026 in the great vault purge. It needs to go in a big beer. Don't use it for a mild ;)

Regarding black treacle. It's been a couple of years but reviewing my notes:
  1. 1/2 cup treacle in 5 gallons produces superior dense bubbles and no noticable treacle taste.
  2. Use 1/4 cup to 1/2 cup for head but no noticeable taste
  3. If you up this to 1 cup, then at least I noticed the taste impact. Then it becomes personal preference
 

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A home brew talkee gifted me with WLP038 Manchester Yeast, that has been recultured and 2L on the stir plate, whilst at the same time I am mashing this beauty: Tony's Pre-1970 Boddington's Clone Recipe (boakandbailey.com)

Hopefully, in about 2 weeks, I will have a good indication if WLP038 is a good yeast to use. Tony's recipe goes for Notty, which is one I like and probably reasonably close in profile. Northern Brewer and taste tests have "proven" that London III isn't the "true" Boddington yeast. I'm hoping WLP038 gets me there.
 

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London III isn't the "true" Boddington yeast. I'm hoping WLP038 gets me there.
Remember that there are other breweries in Manchester - notably Holt's, whose yeast is arguably the closest we've got to Chico in terms of the influence it had in the early days of UK craft beer, it went to Kelham Island, then Thornbridge and then Brewdog.

Personally I wouldn't get too hung up on trying to trace a history, all that matters is that the beer in front of you "works". By all accounts both 026 and 038 do that.
 

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Apropos of nothing in particular, the Ragus blog is always worth a look, their latest one is about muscovado sugar :
 

TheMadKing

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As for cubitainers, I treat them like growlers— best consumed in one evening but definitely within 24 hours.
I agree with this. I've also had a heck of a time getting the proper carbonation level in them because they are a bit stretchy and fiddly with the fill level. I have more or less given up on them to be honest because I don't tend to drink a gallon of beer in a sitting, and (while its not REAL ale) I can live with the compromise of force carbonated bitter for the convenience and shelf life
 

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I agree with this. I've also had a heck of a time getting the proper carbonation level in them because they are a bit stretchy and fiddly with the fill level. I have more or less given up on them to be honest because I don't tend to drink a gallon of beer in a sitting, and (while its not REAL ale) I can live with the compromise of force carbonated bitter for the convenience and shelf life
I had great success with them hooked up to a beer engine, carbonation was spot on (a few pages back you can see some photos).

Now I’ll be serving them via gravity, so I guess we’ll see how it works out.

I did notice if you had some sort of weight on the top to keep the “head” of the Cubitainer from filling with cO2 I got better results. I’m working out some sort of plastic box right now to hold it in.

I’m going to put 2.5gallons of mild in one soon and the other 2.5 in a primed keg with a cO2 injector. Will post results here.
 

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Remember that there are other breweries in Manchester - notably Holt's, whose yeast is arguably the closest we've got to Chico in terms of the influence it had in the early days of UK craft beer, it went to Kelham Island, then Thornbridge and then Brewdog.

Personally I wouldn't get too hung up on trying to trace a history, all that matters is that the beer in front of you "works". By all accounts both 026 and 038 do that.
Wow, silly me, I have 026 in my library from the last Vault purge. Will have to re-culture that puppy and put it to work. I just pitched the WLP038. It's far too dark - probably because I did quite a long mash and boil. Anyhoo, it's the taste that counts.
 

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I had great success with them hooked up to a beer engine, carbonation was spot on (a few pages back you can see some photos).

Now I’ll be serving them via gravity, so I guess we’ll see how it works out.

I did notice if you had some sort of weight on the top to keep the “head” of the Cubitainer from filling with cO2 I got better results. I’m working out some sort of plastic box right now to hold it in.

I’m going to put 2.5gallons of mild in one soon and the other 2.5 in a primed keg with a cO2 injector. Will post results here.
Let me know how this works out? I've got a couple of cubetainers but my first two tries didn't work out very well. They didn't carbonate fully.
 

Erik the Anglophile

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I agree with this. I've also had a heck of a time getting the proper carbonation level in them because they are a bit stretchy and fiddly with the fill level. I have more or less given up on them to be honest because I don't tend to drink a gallon of beer in a sitting, and (while its not REAL ale) I can live with the compromise of force carbonated bitter for the convenience and shelf life
How about naturally carbing in keg to about 1.8-2 vol and then serving at ~10c? That's what I plan on doing when I get to start kegging my beers. A compromise between getting a cask-like feel and actually getting a beer engine + everything else.
 

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Best so far is clearly verdant IPA. Notti is ok but is really clean, so wouldn't be my choice if your are into expressive yeasts. Verdant really delivers that British character, I know of no other dry yeast that does and I tried nearly all of the British ones.
English stouts that I've made came out with not enough residual sugar for me using 1968.
I tried Lallemand Windsor Yeast and happy with the result.
I do want to try Verdant though.
 
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