English Ales - What's your favorite recipe?

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I was actually quite disappointed when I tried it from the bottle, before finding it on cask. By far less good than homebrewed.
Do you have a recipe you can share?

I was teasing in that comment, I agree much better in cask.
 
Lanlord gets the most publicity, but Boltmaker is an awesome beer and I actually prefer it. Don't often find it around Nottingham
I had a lovely pint of Boltmaker in the York Tap at the York train station. Anyone know when the name changed from Best Bitter to Boltmaker?

But I did drink many more pints of Landlord. No regrets!
 
Do you have a recipe you can share?

I was teasing in that comment, I agree much better in cask.
Yes, the recipe is quite well known. 100% Golden Promise, with a bit of black malt added during sparging to achieve colour. Bittered with Fuggle and Golding 1:1 for 30 IBU. Aroma hopping is Savinjski Golding in the last 10 minutes. Yeast is WY1469 at 21°C-22°C.
I made a video about this recipe together with Theakston Old Peculier, though the Theakston recipe was not very accurate:
 
Yes, the recipe is quite well known. 100% Golden Promise, with a bit of black malt added during sparging to achieve colour. Bittered with Fuggle and Golding 1:1 for 30 IBU. Aroma hopping is Savinjski Golding in the last 10 minutes. Yeast is WY1469 at 21°C-22°C.
I made a video about this recipe together with Theakston Old Peculier, though the Theakston recipe was not very accurate:

Do you think there would be some invert in Landlord? I just brewed one a few days ago with 90% Golden Promise, 10% No. 1 and a little caramel color at flameout. Their website lists sugar in the ingredients but I guess that could be priming sugar, I'm not sure. I subscribed to your channel a while back, nice work with all the clone recipes.
 
Do you think there would be some invert in Landlord? I just brewed one a few days ago with 90% Golden Promise, 10% No. 1 and a little caramel color at flameout. Their website lists sugar in the ingredients but I guess that could be priming sugar, I'm not sure. I subscribed to your channel a while back, nice work with all the clone recipes.
The Malt Millers version of Landlord is Golden Promise, Wheat and a touch of Black Malt, but I don't know how accurate it is to the original.
 
I am a duly card carrying member of Perfectionists Anonymous. And yes, as I finished typing that joke I realized the contrary juxtaposition of diametrically opposite thoughts being superimposed in one sentence. And yes, I'm a member of Bloviator's Anonymous as well.

Anyway, given that I have a dozen 325g bottles of Lyle's Golden, I'm just gonna go ahead and call "a bit" = 325g, in a 5 gal batch. I'll have to get back to you on the conversion of a handful.
 
5% invert plus enough black to bring the colour into the right region... something around 30g-40g should be ok.
 
Brewed my first test batch of Best bitterish beer today . Was thinking of ordering some golden syrup and seeing what it brings to the party in the next batch . And to Eric the Anglophile's remark about Black malt ... is that to promote clarity , reduce chill haze you recon? Don't think It will add a whole bunch of color in the sparge , yes?
 
I have heard from multiple sources, including a rep from TT, that landlord is brewed with GP, a bit of invert and a handful of black malt in the sparge.
AFAIR, Taylor's have always advertised Landlord as 100% Golden Promise. If you check their ingredients list, in addition to malt they have listed sugar. So in my last few batches of my "clone" Ive just used 1# of #3 invert. I suspect there may be some other process things like length of boil or addition of caramel that would provide the color but let them use just the Golden Promise. There may also be something about the malting process that provides some or all of the color since they state that the GP is malted to their specs.

Also on the subject of color, I recently heard a English brewer on a podcast saying that the color of his Porter came from chocolate malt and something called a robar. Not sure about that spelling, but is anyone familiar with this?
 
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Brewed this beer from the Camra BYO British Real Ale. This is a the recipe of Haviestoun Ptarmigan Golden ale, a Scottish Brewery. I dropped a couple of malts (black and crystal) as their recipe on their website was updated from the book. Very tasty and clearing up nicely. Bottle conditioned.
 

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I just brewed a Landlord Recipe this past weekend and always go with 100% golden promise - I feel like the hop bill is what makes that beer unique. It’s my 3rd time brewing it and am amazed at how complex the beer turns out. I like verdant to ferment it but I’m not going for a clone, I’m just inspired by that beer. We used to be able to get Landlord in the bottle in the states but not anymore.
 
I just brewed a Landlord Recipe this past weekend and always go with 100% golden promise - I feel like the hop bill is what makes that beer unique. It’s my 3rd time brewing it and am amazed at how complex the beer turns out. I like verdant to ferment it but I’m not going for a clone, I’m just inspired by that beer. We used to be able to get Landlord in the bottle in the states but not anymore.
What do you think about the ester profile of Verdant? Others have said something about vanilla. I have some that I need to try.
 
Not sure I’ve noticed vanilla in that yeast, but it’s become my favorite British dry yeast and now pretty much use that and Nottingham on occasion. It reminds me of Conan which is also a British yeast, has good fruitiness and floccs nicely. It also ferments dry which I appreciate, but I also mash low.

Try it out on a basic Bitter.
 
Gordon Strong has published two very similar Landlord recipes (one in his book Modern Homebrew Recipes and the other one from Brew Your Own) and both call for a 2-3 ounces of debittered black malt in the vorlauf just for color. The one from Brew Your Own says "Golden Promise makes up the full grist of Timothy Taylor Landlord, so I use that. However, the beer has a darker color that I'm not sure I can reach with just that malt. The easiest approach is to use a small amount (2% maybe) of a darker malt to adjust the color without adding significant flavor. I also use a very hard boil and a little chalk in the boil to increase color." He always builds up from RO water and for a 5 gallon batch he adds1/4 tsp. 10% phosphoric acid and 1 tsp. calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the mash and 1/2 tsp. calcium carbonate (CaCO3) to the boil kettle. If you watch the Timothy Taylor brewery tour with Peter Eells he does add brewing salts to the mash but no mention of chalk in the boil.

For hops it is:
6.75 AAU UK Fuggle hops (60 min.) (1.5 oz./43 g at 4.5% alpha acids)
4.1 AAU UK Golding hops (10 min.) (0.75 oz./21 g at 5.5% alpha acids)
1 oz. (28 g) Styrian Golding hops (0 min.)

The video shows the use of a hopback and I think a 0 minute addition of Styrian Goldings is probably a good approximation of that.
 
Do you think there would be some invert in Landlord?
They did not state any in the Real Ale Almanac, so I never used any. I wonder if that's a new trend, since I did not notice that on their webpage when I researched for the recipes in 2021. Maybe I just overlooked it.

I can say that Golden Promise is a great malt on it's own that does not need to hide. It's flavour does become quite watery, though, if served beneath 10°C, as I noticed when brewing a lager with it.
If you watch the Timothy Taylor brewery tour with Peter Eells he does add brewing salts to the mash but no mention of chalk in the boil.
Somewhere it is shown that part of the salts are added during the boil. They only mention burtonisation though.
 
I'm currently trying to revive a frozen Whitbread slurry which I added a dash of glycerine to before freezing. Added it to the starter wort yesterday evening and no signs of life this morning. If this shouldn't work out, I'll be pitching half a pack Windsor and Notti each and brew a basic bitter. Maybe chevallier based. Probably 5% invert and 5% crystal, a dash of black malt, let's see.
 
I see. Might not be as robust. Never tried freezing yeast, so all I can say is good luck!
Thanks. It is an experiment. I gave it a 70/30 chance to succeed. Maybe it's bubbling now, can't see it, I'm at work. I will throw in some s04 if it should wake up. The mix of both should be superior to the single strains according to some testings here in the forum.
 
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Thanks. It is an experiment. I gave it a 70/30 chance to succeed. Maybe it's bubbling now, can't see it, I'm at work. I will throw in some s04 if it should wake up. The mix of both should be superior to the single strains according to some testings here in the forum.
I think you'll have success. I keep multiple strains frozen in 50ml vials. 25ml slurry, 20ml water, 5ml glycerine. When making a starter from a frozen vial it takes a while for it to really get going but I have had 0 failures.
 
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I think you'll have success. I keep multiple strains frozen in 50ml vials. 25ml slurry, 25ml water, 5ml glycerine. When making a starter from a frozen vial it takes a while for it to really get going but I have had 0 failures.
Ok, that sounds promising. In my case, we're talking about about 600ml of thick slurry.
 
Is it really that simple?
Might give it a go as I'm taking up a whole shelf in my fridge with slurry in mason jars.
It's really not difficult. I have a pressure canner so I put the water/glycerine solution into autoclavable plastic vials and heat them at 15psi to sterilize and add the yeast after cooling. I believe I used the process from one or both of the links below.
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/threads/guide-to-making-a-frozen-yeast-bank.35891/https://www.homebrewtalk.com/threads/freezing-yeast.678455/
 
I am actually in the process myself of starting a frozen yeast bank, just got a bunch of 100ml lab jars.
Will in the coming weeks make 2 larger starters of one yeast each, boil 50/50 glycerine/water then mix 50/50 in the yars glycerine water and slurry.
Plan is to use one jar of each yeast in a combined starter ~ a week in advance of brewday.
 
I am actually in the process myself of starting a frozen yeast bank, just got a bunch of 100ml lab jars.
Will in the coming weeks make 2 larger starters of one yeast each, boil 50/50 glycerine/water then mix 50/50 in the yars glycerine water and slurry.
Plan is to use one jar of each yeast in a combined starter ~ a week in advance of brewday.
I think that I have read that more than 10% glycerine in the final solution is actually detrimental.
 
I am actually in the process myself of starting a frozen yeast bank, just got a bunch of 100ml lab jars.
Will in the coming weeks make 2 larger starters of one yeast each, boil 50/50 glycerine/water then mix 50/50 in the yars glycerine water and slurry.
Plan is to use one jar of each yeast in a combined starter ~ a week in advance of brewday.
It's great to be able to walk to the freezer and have multiple strains available any time you need them. For strains I use regularly I'll still top crop or save slurry from a fermentation so I'm not using a frozen vial each time. But, they're there if I need them.
 
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